uterus or womb

quietdandelion

Banned
Formosa/Chinese
A surgeon removed her uterus/womb to keep her from getting pregnant.


In my dictionary, uterus and womb are exactly the same, but I don't know when to use one and when the other. Could I use womb here?
 
  • liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    Uterus is more likely to be used in a medical text, womb is less formal/technical but both refer to the same thing.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Uterus is more likely to be used in a medical text, womb is less formal/technical but both refer to the same thing.
    I agree entirely. I would say, however, that the word "womb" has a very old-world ring to my ears. I wouldn't expect to hear it except perhaps from someone involved in midwifery or from someone very elderly.
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    I agree entirely. I would say, however, that the word "womb" has a very old-world ring to my ears. I wouldn't expect to hear it except perhaps from someone involved in midwifery or from someone very elderly.
    Thanks, Dimcl.
    I have a little problem understanding the underlined part--does it mean "it reminds you of a very old world?"
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Thanks, Dimcl.
    I have a little problem understanding the underlined part--does it mean "it reminds you of a very old world?"
    Sorry, QD - This is from Dictionary.com:

    –adjective 1.of or pertaining to the ancient world or to a former period of history. 2.of or pertaining to the Old World: old-world customs. 3.characteristic of the Old World; quaint; traditional.

    (my highlighting).

    And "ring" means "tone" or "sound"
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    My children are perhaps "old-world," but in my childbearing days, a uterus was a female sex organ. When the uterus was growing a baby, it became a womb. It is always a uterus--even when the uterus is pregnant--but a pregnant uterus is considered a womb.

    Cheers, from an old-world point of view....
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    My children are perhaps "old-world," but in my childbearing days, a uterus was a female sex organ. When the uterus was growing a baby, it became a womb. It is always a uterus--even when the uterus is pregnant--but a pregnant uterus is considered a womb.

    Cheers, from an old-world point of view....
    Thanks, mjscott.
    Are you wrting a poem or riddle? I'm all at sea; will you rephrase it in prose?
     

    Ecossaise

    Senior Member
    English
    womb


    noun the organ in the lower body of a woman or female mammal where offspring are conceived and in which they develop before birth;
    — ORIGIN Old English.

    uterus

    noun the womb.
    — ORIGIN Latin.

    So far as I can make out, they are the same, just one is the Latin term for the other.
     
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