"vai te arrepiar", "é de arrepiar", etc.

kynnjo

Senior Member
USA Spanish and English
It's getting to be carnaval time, and I've been listening to a lot of the new official 2010 enredos in YouTube... I've been struck by how often the comments from appreciative Brazilians include variations of "arrepiar" (=get goosebumps). It's not that the notion is hyperbolic, not at all (I too get goosebumps sometimes listening to this music, especially when one of those armies of sambistas goes off a cappella). Rather, what surprises me is that, as far as I can tell, "arrepiar" is used not only by women, but often by men too. Is this impression accurate?

In US English, expressions like "it gave me goosebumps" is heard mostly from females. One may hear it from very young boys (say, 5 or younger), or from flamboyant gay men. But a "regular US guy" won't readily admit to getting goosebumps outside of his therapist's office, and least of all from listening to music; the US male culture regards it as unmanly.

BTW, I thought that maybe in colloquial BP "arrepiar" had lost its literal meaning, like "cool" has in colloquial English. But some the expressions I found do sound quite literal; e.g. "Lindo enredo, cheguei a me arrepiar".

TIA, muito arrepiado,

~K

Edit: As an afterthought I experimented with Google: "todo arrepiado" gets 73,700 hits, while "toda arrepiada" gets 52,800 hits, which suggests that men use the term significantly more often than women do. Unless the search is wrong or misleading for some reason. I was thinking of expressions like "fico/estou tod(o/a) arrepiad(o/a)"...
 
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  • anaczz

    Senior Member
    Português (Brasil)
    There is no genre restrictions in the use of this word in Portuguese. I don't see what would be the matter. We use: "arrepiado" from cold, fear, and from any strong emotion and also in the sense Vanda remembered.

    Thinking better...
    "Fiquei todo arrepiado." sounds a bit gay.
    But "Fiquei arrepiado quando ouvi aquela música." sounds straight fo me.
    The difference is in "todo". :)
     
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    kynnjo

    Senior Member
    USA Spanish and English
    Oi Tia,

    This arrepiar is being used as Ter destaque, fazer sucesso.
    (see here definition number 5)
    Hi, Vanda. It's hard for me to see how "cheguei a me arrepiar" could mean something as neutral and emotion-free as "ter destaque, fazer sucesso", but I don't have a native's feel for the language, so I defer.

    BTW, "TIA" is Internetese for "thanks in advance." If anything, eu sou um tio! :)

    Thanks,

    ~K
     

    Vanda

    Moderesa de Beagá
    Português/ Brasil
    hahhaha, I am laughing at myself because of TIA. (internetês is not allowed in WR unless it is part of the question. ;))

    I thought at first that you were mentioning the idiomatic expression: é de arrepiar, vamos arrepiar, arrepiou'' and the like. These expressions mean what I have said above: having success.

    The other meaning - the literal - is like Ana has already explained.
     

    kynnjo

    Senior Member
    USA Spanish and English
    Thinking better...
    "Fiquei todo arrepiado." sounds a bit gay.
    But "Fiquei arrepiado quando ouvi aquela música." sounds straight fo me.
    The difference is in "todo". :)
    FWIW, on Google: "fico todo arrepiado", 233,000 hits; "fico toda arrepiada", 128,000 hits.

    BTW, let it be clear that my observation in the first post meant no disrespect; I too don't see anything the least bit unmanly about being emotionally moved by music. US male culture is notorious for its intense repression of anything having to do with emotions and aesthetics, to the point of comedy. The movies "Analyze This" and "Analyze That" are basically long (and hilarious) riffs on this. (True, these movies poke fun at the Mafioso code of conduct, the same taboos exist in the US male culture at large.) One of the aspects of Brazilian culture that I most admire, in fact I'm envious of, is how openly it embraces beauty in all its forms. O carnaval is perhaps the most spectacular example of this. It's no coincidence that the world's greatest carnivals happen in Brasil.

    Cheers,

    ~K
     

    anaczz

    Senior Member
    Português (Brasil)
    I think "latin" cutures are even worst about male codes of conduct but each people has their own specific codes. For instance, in most regions of Brazil men dont use to use (?) diminutives, because it is considered unmanly.
    In Portugal is very usual for a man to use diminutives.

    (please review my English)
     

    kynnjo

    Senior Member
    USA Spanish and English
    I think "latin" cutures are even worse about male codes of conduct but each people has their own specific codes.
    Very true. The only constant seems to be a hyper-vigilance over any detail that could possibly appear unmanly.

    For instance, in most regions of Brazil men don't use to use (?) diminutives, because it is considered unmanly.
    In Portugal it is very usual for a man to use diminutives.
    No "cafezinho" for them? And they can never be "sozinhos"? :)

    This observation is particularly surprising to me, because in the Hispanic societies I'm familiar with, where machismo is alive and well, diminutives are used with abandon by both men and women...

    ~K
     
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    anaczz

    Senior Member
    Português (Brasil)
    I mean in Portugal is possible to hear a man saying: "Tenho os pezinhos a doer, pois andei muito". I can´t imagine a brazilian macho saying such words.
    Cafezinhos they are allowed to drink. :)
     

    Nonstar

    Senior Member
    Pajubá/dialetos das quebrada
    I am not manly in Vin Diesel´s or Daniel Craig´s (good examples of manly women-worshipped males? ;) ), however I indulge in usual "rude" male stuff, if I´m given the opportunity, and I'd say without any hesitation, with care though, that something might give me goosebumps. It all depends on the way you say it, ironically, amusingly, gayly, whatever. I know gay guys who cannot stand those who are flamboyant and do not sound gay at all. In a nutshell, it depends. The flamboyance gays have may annoy even their peers.

    P. s. I´m a maloqueiro!
     
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