vaikkakin / vaikkakaan

Gavril

Senior Member
English, USA
Consider the following example (from a summary of pharmaceutical product features):

Ahdaskulmaglaukoomapotilaita [...] tulee myös seurata tarkoin, vaikkakaan antikolinergisia haittavaikutuksia ei ole odotettavissa [lääkkeen X]-hoidon aikana.

"Patients with narrow-angle glaucoma [...] should also be closely monitored, [??] anticholinergic side effects are not expected during treatment with [medicine X]."


Without further knowledge of the context, would you say that vaikkakaan means

- "even though" -- which would imply that these effects are generally not expected

or

- "even if" -- i.e., even in situations where these effects are not expected
(with no implication about how common or rare this expectation is)

?

And is there something about "vaikkakaan" (as opposed to merely "vaikka") that helps us determine the answer to this?

Thanks,
Gavril
 
  • In my understanding, vaikkakaan always precedes a negation: "vaikkakaan haittavaikutuksia ei ole odotettavissa".

    Vaikka(kin), on the other hand, is used when the following conclusion is unexpected, or opposite to what one might think,: "vaikka haittavaikutuksia ei ole odotettavissa, tulee potilaita silti seurata tarkoin". (The word "silti" is optional in the preceding sentence, I just added it to make my point.)
     
    Thanks.

    Do you have an opinion about whether vaikkakaan means "even though" or "even if" in this context?

    - "even though" -- which would imply that these effects are generally not expected

    or

    - "even if" -- i.e., even in situations where these effects are not expected
    (with no implication about how common or rare this expectation is)
     
    In this particular case, I would go for "even though". They are saying that side effects are not expected, but the patients should be monitored nevertheless.

    I'm not sure I fully and correctly understand the difference between "even though" and "even if" in English. But if I do, I would translate the "even if" version into Finnish as follows: Vaikka haittavaikutuksia ei olisikaan odotettavissa, tulee potilaita silti / kuitenkin / siitä huolimatta seurata tarkoin.
     
    I'm not sure I fully and correctly understand the difference between "even though" and "even if" in English.

    Roughly speaking:

    If you say "even though [X]", you are presenting "X" as a fact.

    If you say "even if [X]", you are presenting "X" as a possibility, not necessarily a fact.

    Any clearer now? :)
     
    Roughly speaking:

    If you say "even though [X]", you are presenting "X" as a fact.

    If you say "even if [X]", you are presenting "X" as a possibility, not necessarily a fact.

    Any clearer now? :)

    Thanks. That's what I thought. But my English is far from perfect, idiomatic expressions are tricky sometimes, and I don't want to transmit any misconceptions...
     
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