Varied/Variedly vs Varying/Varyingly

G.Determinism

Senior Member
Persian
Greetings,

I tried to use the word 'varied' in different ways, as you can see below. But I'm not sure if they are correct or not.

Could you please tell me your thoughts on the following examples?

I honestly have no idea. I also don't really discern the difference between varied and varying.

1. "Men's tennis is more varied than women's."

2. "The way men play tennis is generally more varied."

3. "Men play more varied tennis."

4. "Men play more variedly/varyingly."

Many thanks
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    varied (adj.) - having distinct varieties or types or styles, etc. "The colours of the flowers are quite varied."

    varying (adj.) - irregular, lacking consistency; changing often. "I did the experiment several times but I had varying results: sometimes, some of the metal dissolved, sometimes none of it did and, on one or two occasions, all of it dissolved quickly."
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Grammatically speaking 1 and 2 sound fine. I'm not so sure about the truth of their content though.

    3 feels like it needs something else - 'more varied' than what?

    4 sounds wrong - with 'variedly' and 'varyingly'. I'm not sure that 'varyingly' is a word.

    Cross-posted.
     

    G.Determinism

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Thanks a lot, Paul and heypresto.

    I really appreciate it if you could let me know if 'varied' is a good choice of word in that context. In men's tennis you see more variety than women's tennis in terms of shots, styles and ... . I just wonder whether I can use the adjective form and adverb form of 'vary' for this meaning.

    Thanks a lot
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Like heypresto, I would not use the adverb - there's something awkward about it.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    "Men play more in a varied/varying" manner."
    "Men play more varied/varying" tennis."
     

    G.Determinism

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Thanks a lot, Paul.

    Just a question about the position of 'more'

    'Men play more in a varied manner.'
    'Men play in a more varied mannar.'

    What's the difference between these two?

    Thanks a lot
     

    G.Determinism

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Personally, I perfer the second variation. I don't know why. :oops: There seems to be a difference in meaning but it's so subtle that I can't describe.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I tend to agree

    'Men play more in a varied manner.' -> "It is more likely that men will play in a manner that varies" or "Men play more often in a varied manner." On its own, it is not very clear and the listener would be puzzled as to what is meant. Perhaps someone could to find a context that this response would fit.

    'Men play in a more varied manner.' -> Men play in a greater variety of styles :thumbsup:
     
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