veghea = to stay/be awake at night?

linguistics_nut

Member
English - U.S.
Hello! I apologize ahead of time, because I don't know much Romanian. But I am studying words involving sleeping, waking, and staying up at night (mostly in Spanish). I was wondering if veghea used to mean 'stay/be awake' or if it still does for anyone out there?
 
  • farscape

    mod-errare humanum est
    Romanian
    Hey linguistics_nut,

    It depends a lot on the context. As a stand alone verb it usually means to stay awake or not to sleep during the night

    It could mean to look after someone or something, to supervise or even stand on guard.

    If you need a more refined answer we'll need a context.

    Cheers,
    f.
     

    linguistics_nut

    Member
    English - U.S.
    Thank you for the quick response, farscape! So, would veghea be the most appropriate verb for the following sentences?:

    I've stayed up until 2am or later every night this week.

    I plan to be up all night studying for the exam.

    Why are you always awake at night? (like, why do you "veghea" all the time? - sorry, I don't know enough Romanian to put this a better way!)

    Thanks again!
     

    farscape

    mod-errare humanum est
    Romanian
    Here are the (more) common translations:

    I've stayed up until 2am or later everynight -> Am stat treaz până la 2 în fiecare noapte (ca să învăț pentru examen) / N-am dormit până (I didn't sleep until) la 2 în fiecare noapte...

    I plan to be up all night -> Am de gând (Plănuiesc) să stau treaz toată noaptea învățând pentru examen.

    Now an example with "a sta de veghe":

    Am stat de veghe toată noaptea așteptându-l -> I've been up all night waiting for him.

    In other words, a sta de veghe doesn't seem to imply an active and direct action, mainly implies being up and watching over or being ready/prepared for something.

    The verb itself a veghea is better understood as to watch over or to take care of something:

    (A bit archaic) Am vegheat - am avut grijă - ca dorința lui să fie îndeplinită -> I took care to have his wish fulfilled.

    f.
     

    irinet

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Hi,
    Here are the (more) common translations:

    (A bit archaic) Am vegheat - am avut grijă - ca dorința lui să fie îndeplinită -> I took care to have his wish fulfilled.
    f.

    In other words, to this context, the new verb, 'to supervise' = am supravegeat/ am avut grijă ca/am supervizat' can replace the old Romanian use of 'a veghea'.


    I plan to be up all night -> Am de gând (Plănuiesc) să stau treaz toată noaptea învățând pentru examen.

    Here's another story with being up all night. We say "a face o noapte albă" (= have a white night!) for any reasons we may have (a party, study, work, cannot sleep, etc.).

    Now, my opinion is that 'a veghea' strongly emphasize the American idea of "on sb's watch" things can or cannot happen. It has also a very positive connotation. So, I wouldn't link it to "staying up". With 'being awake' is more apropriate when this action implies 'watching over someone or something to happen', as Farscape already mentioned in his posts. I would also like to add the idea of "protecting" someone like, ' the moon light shedding over us every night, or something like, a treasure is well-guarded.
     
    Last edited:
    Top