velcro [as a verb?]

NickJunior

Senior Member
Khmer
Hello Forum,
I want to know how to use the word velcro in a sentence. Can I say something like this, "Please velcro your shoes?" or should it be, "Please fasten your shoes" instead. Thank you ahead of time for your input.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I would probably say, "Please fasten your shoes."

    If you'd like to see Velcro in sentence, just put the word in the Search box and click the "in context" link. Velcro is a brand name, so it should be capitalized, but it is quickly becoming genericized, so you will see it will a lowercase "v."
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Velcro is a tradename for a fastener system. It should (still) always be spelled Velcro. I would avoid using it as anything other than the name of the product. SO "Please fasten your shoes". It may be losing its trademark status, however, like Kleenex and Xerox so don't be surprised to see it used as a "real" word like in your example - then it could be noun, verb or even adjective, I suppose :D

    From the dictionary here, but you read that already, didn't you?

    Velcro /ˈvɛlkrəʊ/
    ▶noun trademark a fastener consisting of two strips of thin plastic sheet, one covered with tiny loops and the other with tiny flexible hooks, which adhere when pressed together.

    – derivatives
    Velcroed adjective.
    – origin 1960s: from Fr. velours croché ‘hooked velvet’.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Because many people would object, I wouldn't use Velcro as a verb myself.

    However, some people do. Here is an example of the exact use you propose, in an article on bicycle safety published in the Washington CityPaper:
    The true masochists among them were still smoking as they Velcroed their bike cleats.


    The verb form is also used metaphorically, when people 'stick' close together:
    The Tigers and Longhorns were more or less Velcroed to each other until late in the first half, with MU taking its biggest lead on an English jumper that made it 26-18. stltoday.com ("The #1 St Louis website.")
     
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