Velcro

Super Saiyan

Senior Member
Cantonese
Hi I just checked the dictionary. Velcro can be used as a verb.

Velcro | Definition of Velcro in English by Lexico Dictionaries

But some disagreed the word used as a verb.

When you want to teach a child to put on their shoes step by step, you say "You need to Velcro your shoes." I am wondering what is the opposite way of saying this. "UnVelcro"?

"Can you please Unvelcro your shoes?" Of course you can say "Can you please unfasten your shoes?" But if you have to use and say it, would you say "UnVelcro" them?

And Velcro needs to be uppercase? Thanks
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The examples in the dictionary you link to seem good to me (apart from the capital "V").

    ‘the doctor Velcroed the top of Badri's nightgown together’
    ‘Thad consulted the chronometer Velcroed to his wrist’
    ‘It's like a duffel bag, but with mesh sides, rigid lining, and a washable fleecy blanket velcroed to the bottom.’



    If I were simply talking about taking off a pair of shoes, where it isn't important whether the shoes are lace-ups or with a velcro tab, or have some other kind of fastening, I wouldn't bother to mention it.

    I agree with Barque here in that I usually see a lower-case v: The pen was velcroed to the notepad (I personally wouldn't use the verb)/attached to the notepad with velcro.

    If I saw a child struggling with the fastening on their shoes: You have to pull on the velcro tab to undo it.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ‘Thad consulted the chronometer Velcroed to his wrist’
    He'd have to have the hairiest arm in history for it to be velcroed to his wrist.

    I think this is a bad example. I think something velcroed to something else attaches it in a way that's not possible by other materials. Something flat attaches to something flat. A strap around your wrist might use Velcro, but it's not velcroed to your wrist. Just like a watchband that uses a buckle is not buckled to your wrist. They both go around your wrist.

    I would use fastened with Velcro for shoes. Undo or unfasten your shoes.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think this is a bad example. I think something velcroed to something else attaches it in a way that's not possible by other materials. Something flat attaches to something flat. A strap around your wrist might use Velcro, but it's not velcroed to your wrist. Just like a watchband that uses a buckle is not
    I've heard people use "velcroed to something" to mean "attach by means of a velcro strap" many times. It's like being "zip-tied to something." You can also velcro something to something via adhesive dots/strips. The object of "velcro" doesn't have to have integral hooks or loops itself.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I wouldn't use it that way. Zip ties are the actual attachment mechanism. They physically hold something in the loop. A Velcro strap is still a strap and it's the strap that's doing the holding. Nothing you're holding is being touched by the Velcro. In the case of zip ties, the zip ties are in direct contact with the item.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I really don't see what velcroed adds.
    If I were simply talking about taking off a pair of shoes, where it isn't important whether the shoes are lace-ups or with a velcro tab, or have some other kind of fastening, I wouldn't bother to mention it.
    The chronometer is strapped to his wrist. The strap is holding it in place. The Velcro is completely secondary to the mechanism of the strap holding it in place. It could be snapped, it could be buckled, it could use Velcro, it could be tied. If the strap used snaps I wouldn't say the watch was snapped to his wrist so I don't see what the point of saying it was velcroed to his wrist is. It's not velcroed to his wrist. It's strapped around/on his wrist using a Velcro strap. Or any other strap that would work.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I think velcro straps are a recent addition to the velcro world. In its original uses it was integral to the product, not a separate strap.

    In 1967 my Alfa Romeo had velcro fasteners for the soft top. (I thought it was an Italian word.)

    I would say, "Strap it on using the supplied velcro fasterners; remove by releasing the velcro fastener."
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I really don't see what velcroed adds.

    The chronometer is strapped to his wrist. The strap is holding it in place. The Velcro is completely secondary to the mechanism of the strap holding it in place. It could be snapped, it could be buckled, it could use Velcro, it could be tied. If the strap used snaps I wouldn't say the watch was snapped to his wrist so I don't see what the point of saying it was velcroed to his wrist is. It's not velcroed to his wrist. It's strapped around/on his wrist using a Velcro strap. Or any other strap that would work.
    The writer, with writer's prerogative, simply wanted to communicate how the strapping/attachment was achieved. It was "attached by a velcro strap to his wrist" is rather wordier than necessary when (almost) everyone will understand the meaning from the simpler "velcroed".
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The writer, with writer's prerogative, simply wanted to communicate how the strapping/attachment was achieved. It was "attached by a velcro strap to his wrist" is rather wordier than necessary when (almost) everyone will understand the meaning from the simpler "velcroed".
    If you wore those shoes mentioned above that have Velcro fasteners instead of laces, would you tell someone your shoes were velcroed to your feet? And if your shoes had laces, would you say that you tied your shoes (on)to your feet?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    If you wore those shoes mentioned above that have Velcro fasteners instead of laces, would you tell someone your shoes were velcroed to your feet? And if your shoes had laces, would you say that you tied your shoes (on)to your feet?
    I would say the shoes were velcroed to my feet if they were attached by means of velcro straps / strips / dots / etc.
    I would say the shoes were tied to my feet if they were tied with ropes or string.

    All your logic is useless in the face of actual usage. ;) If you said your shoes were glued to your feet, it wouldn't mean that your shoes had glue in the place of laces, would it? ;)
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I'm saying there is no reason to treat it differently from every other technology out there. There is nothing special about Velcro, except the "cool" factor, and that wore off a long time ago.

    You have a watch on, you have shoes on. You are wearing a watch, you are wearing shoes.

    You no more have a watch velcroed to your wrist than you have shoes velcroed to your feet.

    Put your shoes on. We're leaving. :thumbsup:
    Velcro your shoes on. We're leaving.:thumbsdown:

    At some point in the future I might ask someone if they are wearing their watch. I will never ask them if they velcroed their watch to their wrist before leaving the house. And I wager you won't either.
     
    Last edited:

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I'm saying there is no reason to treat it differently from every other technology out there. There is nothing special about Velcro, except the "cool" factor, and that wore off a long time ago.

    You have a watch on, you have shoes on. You are wearing a watch, you are wearing shoes.

    You no more have a watch velcroed to your wrist than you have shoes velcroed to your feet.

    Put your shoes on. We're leaving. :thumbsup:
    Velcro your shoes on. We're leaving.:thumbsdown:
    I'm quite happy with the following logic, but apparently you are not.

    I have a watch attached to my wrist with a strap. = I have a watch strapped to my wrist.
    I have a watch attached to my wrist using velcro. = I have a watch velcroed to my wrist.
    In either case, I just "take the watch off" without needed to explain the precise mechanics of reversing the fastening device.
    (Velcro has two parts: the hooks faric and the loops fabric)
     
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