Venetian: stress of words ending in a consonant

  • symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    Hi! I'm from Veneto and I can tell you that, as far as I can recollect, all Venetian words ending in a consonant are stressed on the last syllable, be they proper names or nouns or verbs alike.
     

    symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    Mmmm, I'm not sure... I'm not from Venice but from nearby Vicenza, and here we usually put an "e" at the end of infinitive verbs, so we say "onzere" with the stress on the first syllable ("onzere" actually means "to smear" and to be "onto" (past participe) just means to be dirty); so I guess Wikipedia is right. How comes you want to know about Venetian, if I may ask?
     

    LoveVanPersie

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Hakka
    I found a Venetian word ónxar, which is probably the former word. Do you spell the same word as ónxare?
    Haha I just found some Italian footballers' surnames ending in a consonant, which is rare in Italian, are all stressed on the last syllable. I once thought if they're French, but according to forebears, number of people who bear the three surnames in Italy is more than that in France, and I couldn't find any news saying the three players are of French (or other French-speaking countries') descent. Besides, mappe dei cognomi italiani implies that they're Venetian. Then I came up with this question.o_O
     
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    symposium

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    Yes, family names ending with a consonant (usually a "n") are typical of Veneto. Think of the clothing brand "Benetton" (stress on the last syllable) among many others. I don't really spell Venetian words because dialects in Italy are mostly spoken languages and spelling rules are arbitrary, meaning that there is no authority that decides how words should be spelt.
     

    francisgranada

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    I wonder if Venetian words ending in a consonant are stressed on the last syllable mostly?
    I think mostly yes, but not because they end in a consonant, rather because they maintain the original/etymological stress of (vulgar) Latin. In other words, the last unstressed vowels were often left, but the stress remained on "it's place". It is valid for some other Romance languages, as well. Even for Italian: if we say in Italian e.g. amor, amar, aman instead of amore, amare, amano (the forms without the final -e are possible and "legal" in standard Italian) , then the stress will remain on the original syllable, which then will become typically (but not necessarily) the last syllable of the word. The same happens in Spanish, Portuguese, partially in French (see e.g. aimer, but prendre, from Latin amare and prehendere), etc ... Of course, there are also exceptions.

    For example, the surname Buffon might come from a former *Buffone. After the loss of the final -e in Venetian, the stressed syllable has become the last syllable of this word.

    To be precise, I don't speak Venetian, thus what I have written is rather a (quasi) general principle, in my opinion valid also for the Venetian.
     
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