ventilate=medicine subject to artificial respiration

bonbon2023

Senior Member
Korean(south)
According to the Oxford dictionary, ventilate has this meaning.
"ventilate
3 Medicine subject to artificial respiration:
the patient was sedated and ventilated."


'Ventilate', in the sentence, would not indicate the medicine did 'artificial respiration'. And I think the sentence mean the same thing as "the patient was sedated and was given an anesthetic" because the anesthetic would be injected before doctors operating medical devices including one functions as 'artificial respiration'. Is it right understanding of the definition?
 
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  • cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    Either the Oxford has left out some punctuation or you're misreading the definition. It should read: "Ventilate 3. Medicine: [the colon is essential] subject to artificial respiration:
    Thus "In the field of medicine, 'to ventilate means 'to subject (someone) to artificial respiration'."
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Note that 'subject' is pronounced differently according to whether it is a verb or not. The pronunciations are shown in the dictionary.

    Briefly:
    "to subject" - verb - is pronounced sub'ject
    "subject" - noun - is pronounced 'subject

    In your example it is the verb form that is being used, i.e. "to ventilate" = "to sub'ject to artificial respiration"

    ... Does the 'was ventilated' mean 'the patient' 'was given anesthetic' before doctors operating medical devices including one functions as 'artificial respiration'?
    I would try to answer this question but I am unable to parse it. Have you missed out a word?
     
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    pwmeek

    Senior Member
    English - American
    According to the Oxford dictionary, ventilate has this meaning.
    "ventilate
    3 Medicine subject to artificial respiration:
    the patient was sedated and ventilated."


    'Ventilate', in the sentence, would not indicate the medicine did 'artificial respiration', I think. Does the 'was ventilated' mean 'the patient' 'was given anesthetic' before doctors operating medical devices including one functions as 'artificial respiration'?
    Others have correctly identified ventilation as artificially helping the patient to breathe. It is not done with drugs, but by giving air or extra oxygen, and if needed, helping the lungs to fill and empty by air pressure or by mechanical means.

    Sedation is quite different from anesthesia. Sedation is giving medicine or drugs to calm or relax a patient, even put him to sleep. Anesthesia is giving medicine or drugs to deaden pain. Anesthesia may cause a patient to become unconscious, but that is not the main purpose.
     

    bonbon2023

    Senior Member
    Korean(south)
    Thank you all.
    Note that 'subject' is pronounced differently according to whether it is a verb or not. The pronunciations are shown in the dictionary.

    Briefly:
    "to subject" - verb - is pronounced sub'ject
    "subject" - noun - is pronounced 'subject

    In your example it is the verb form that is being used, i.e. "to ventilate" = "to sub'ject to artificial respiration"


    I would try to answer this question but I am unable to parse it. Have you missed out a word?
    No. I thought 'ventilate' as 'give an anesthetic'.
     
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