ver de terre

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Pootlelover

New Member
English - England
hello,

my french boyfriend just sent me a text message calling me his 'petit verre de terre'.... could anyone tell me if this is actually a french expression or just something silly he made up?! 'little glass of earth' makes no sense! :confused:

i know i should just ask him but i thought i'd give this a go first to see if anyone could enlighten me....

many thanks!
 
  • L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    hello,

    my french boyfriend just sent me a text message calling me his 'petit verre de terre'.... could anyone tell me if this is actually a french expression or just something silly he made up?! 'little glass of earth' makes no sense! :confused:

    i know i should just ask him but i thought i'd give this a go first to see if anyone could enlighten me....

    many thanks!
    It means "my little earthworm" (very affectionate, I'm sure.) :)

    Oops, my spelling isn't all that good in french, perhaps he did mean "my little glass of earth " :~
    (...or maybe his spelling isn't all that hot either. ;) )
     

    Topsie

    Senior Member
    English-UK
    a ver de terre is an earthworm.
    a verre de terre is a glass made of earth :confused: (methinks your boyfriend can't spell!)
    Welcome to the forum by the way!!!
     

    Pootlelover

    New Member
    English - England
    HAHAHAHAHA thankyou so much everyone, wow this forum is so QUICK! yes indeed he must have meant earthworm as he does say i am like a little worm in bed in the morning! (we mainly speak in english)
    i will definitely mock him for his spelling now! HAHAHAHAHA!

    THANK YOU!!!
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    Note to French-speakers: if you want to get romantic with an English-speaking friend, don't try my little earthworm! (very ugly in English)
     

    Pootlelover

    New Member
    English - England
    hahaha, so true! if an english boyfriend had ever called me his little earthworm i wouldn't have been so amused!
    i texted him back to verify whether he did indeed mean VER de terre, or if i was actually a 'little glass of earth', and he described himself as a 'piètre professeur de francais'!

    but yes, he is a true poet hey. ;-)

    thanks again!
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    Yup, welcome to the forum Pootlelover :)

    a ver de terre is an earthworm.:tick:
    a verre de terre is a glass made of earth :cross: :confused: (methinks your boyfriend can't spell! :tick:)
    Verre de terre = a glass of earth (containing earth), as in verre de vin ;)
    Verre en terre = a glass made of earth
    Note to French-speakers: if you want to get romantic with an English-speaking friend, don't try my little earthworm! (very ugly in English)
    I concur; it could be seen as derogatory :p
     

    BEEKEEPER

    Senior Member
    France French
    Yup, welcome to the forum Pootlelover :)


    Verre de terre = a glass of earth (containing earth), as in verre de vin ;)
    Verre en terre = a glass made of earth

    I concur; it could be seen as derogatory :p
    Bonsoir,
    Ce n'est guère poétique en français. Il y a tant d'animaux plus adaptés au bestiaire amoureux.
     

    Ysae

    Member
    French
    Je n'ai jamais entendu cette expression dans ce contexte en français. En revanche, on peut parler d'un enfant qui s'agite beaucoup comme d'un "petit ver"...
     

    vanagreg

    Senior Member
    France, French
    Note to French-speakers: if you want to get romantic with an English-speaking friend, don't try my little earthworm! (very ugly in English)
    Well, I have never heard somebody calling their boyfriend "ver de terre" before :)

    And in France earthworms are ugly too :)
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Careful guys 'n gals,
    I believe it's important to translate ver de terre as earthworm, so as to avoid confusion with the worm medival meaning the dragon. :eek:
    ( Perhaps I've just been watching too much Monty Python. ;) )
     
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    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    … Ce n'est guère poétique en français. Il y a tant d'animaux plus adaptés au bestiaire amoureux.
    D'accord, ce n'est pas le summum de la poésie. Je voulais simplement corriger, puis expliquer

    • la petite faute de traduction
    • que j'étais du même avis avec Wildan ("very ugly in English")
    > Derogatory = dégradant
    "Ma petite biche", etc, aurait fait l'affaire, je l'admet, mais si Pootlelover se trémousse tous les matins… pourquoi pas un ver de terre ou même un asticot? :D
    … I believe it's important to translate ver de terre as earthworm, so as to avoid confusion with the worm medival meaning the dragon. :eek:
    (Perhaps I've just been watching too much Monty Python. ;) )
    I agree with the translation (it has to be earhworm). Apart from M. Python and his dragon, you could mix 'worm' with the Mezcal worm, or any other worms, come to think of it… :rolleyes:
     

    mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    To comment on Wildan1's statement: no, "my little earthworm" does not play very well as a term of endearment in English, but it is not uncommon to refer to wriggly babies as "my little wiggle worm" so we're not blind to the adorableness of the hyperactive!
     

    BEEKEEPER

    Senior Member
    France French
    D'accord, ce n'est pas le summum de la poésie. Je voulais simplement corriger, puis expliquer

    • la petite faute de traduction
    • que j'étais du même avis avec Wildan ("very ugly in English")
    > Derogatory = dégradant
    "Ma petite biche", etc, aurait fait l'affaire, je l'admet, mais si Pootlelover se trémousse tous les matins… pourquoi pas un ver de terre ou même un asticot? :D

    I agree with the translation (it has to be earhworm). Apart from M. Python and his dragon, you could mix 'worm' with the Mezcal worm, or any other worms, come to think of it… :rolleyes:
    D'accord pour asticot. C'est un mot qui peut être utilisé pour un enfant : c'est un vrai petit asticot.
     

    Topsie

    Senior Member
    English-UK
    Well, I have never heard somebody calling their boyfriend "ver de terre" before :)...
    Most young (or even not so young!) men I know would be mortified at being compared to an earthworm! :D
    However, the recipient of the compliment in this case is a young lady... who appears to be charmed by it :eek:, so who are we to question...:confused:
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    Most young (or even not so young!) men I know would be mortified at being compared to an earthworm! :D
    However, the recipient of the compliment in this case is a young lady... who appears to be charmed by it :eek:, so who are we to question...:confused:
    I fully agree :D. Pootlelover seems to love this 'unique' word, just made for her by her boyfriend. If he wriggles with her 'in unison', perhaps she could call him "mon petit asticot" (and see his reaction :D)
    Sounds funny in both languages! I think saying this to your girlfriend would end in a bruise on your face!
    Hey, Pootlelover loves it… ;), so definitely no bruises.
     

    anangelaway

    Senior Member
    French
    Bonjour à tous, :)

    Since Pootlelover is now aware of the difference between ver and verre and understands perfectly the meaning of ver de terre in her particular context, there is no need to carry on trying to discuss whether we like or dislike to be called a earhworm (or any other worms for that matter :p)

    The question has been fully addressed, so this thread is now closed.

    Thank you for your attention.

    Anangelaway
    Moderator.
     
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