Verb-forming suffix for loanwords

Testing1234567

Senior Member
Cantonese
I'm well aware that this question does not apply to all languages, especially those languages that do not have a concept of suffixes.

In Spanish, we use -ear to form a verb from a loanword, e.g. hackear. This is from Vulgar Latin -idiāre/-izāre, and is cognate with Spanish -izar and English -ize.

In German, (correct me if I am wrong), we use -ieren, which is interestingly from Old French -ier.

What suffix does your language use? What is its etymology?
 
  • apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    In Greek we use «-άρω» [-ˈaɾo] e.g Eng. zoom > Gr. «ζουμ-άρω» [zuˈmaɾo] --> to zoom, It. coglione > Gr. «κογιον-άρω» [koʝoˈnaɾo] --> to mock.
    The suffix derives from the Latin verbal suffix -āre which was borrowed, and became extremely productive, in Byzantine Greek.
     
    Last edited:

    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Finnish:

    -ta/-tä

    zoomata
    printata
    häkätä
    googlata

    -oida/-öidä

    hakkeroida
    adaptoida

    -taa/-tää

    googlettaa
     

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    Some more examples of Spanish -ear in loanwords: postear, tuitear "to tweet", spoilear, trolear, escanear "to scan".

    In Catalan, this Spanish productive verbal sufix is calqued, so we usually use -ejar (cognate of Spanish -ear, French -oyer, Italian -eggiare, etc.). However, since in native words this sufix has a marked frequentative meaning, some prefer to use -ar (tuitar instead of tuitejar, blocar instead of bloquejar, etc.).

    I think that Portuguese, French and Italian use the bare first-conjugation sufix (-ar, -er and -are respectively), but let's wait for more comments.
     

    franknagy

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    -*z or -*l

    The asterisk above means a binding vowel which depend on the vowel of the loaned noun.

    Chat -> csetel,
    internet -> internetez,
    surf -> szörföl,
    box -> kokszol,
    Schraube -> sróf -> srófol.
     

    luitzen

    Senior Member
    Frisian, Dutch and Low Saxon
    In Dutch regular verbs ate created with -en and this doesn't depend on whether the word is a loan or not. Some verb forms are a bit complicated though, especially the past perfect. This is also true for verbs that are compounds.

    West Frisian has two classes of verbs. I'm not sure why verbs get in a certain class, but once it's done it's easy. Creating the past perfect is also much easier than in Dutch.
     

    franknagy

    Senior Member
    Hungarian verb from Latin verb
    Let me contain with verbs coming from Latin and Romance languages.

    The -ar(e) suffix of the Infinitivus is replaced with the -*l or -*z element used for forming verbs from nous:
    kondoleál, derivál, dipromázik, diggerál (the professor asks the student during lab).
    In case of Romance loanword which got in the German language -ieren, the Hungarian counterpart end with -íroz:
    treníroz, dresszíroz, kommandíroz, fixíroz.

    The examples are in Indeterminate conjugation 1st person singular. (That is the vocabulary form of Hungarian verbs because of the null or -ik suffix.)
     

    Nino83

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I think that [...] Italian use the bare first-conjugation sufix (-ar, -er and -are respectively), but let's wait for more comments.
    :thumbsup:
    Craccare (to crack), googlare [gugo'la:re] (to google), linkare (to link).
     

    spindlemoss

    Senior Member
    Welsh
    To make a verbnoun from a borrowed word in Welsh, we usually use -io:

    park > parcio [ˈparkjɔ]​

    hack > hacio [ˈhakjɔ]​

    print > printio [ˈprɪntjɔ]​

    smooth > smwddio [ˈsmʊðjɔ] "to iron"​

    In spoken Welsh in the south, this is usually -o:

    parco [ˈparkɔ]​

    haco [ˈhakɔ]​

    printo [ˈprɪntɔ]​

    smwddo [ˈsmuːðɔ]​

    -o is also often used all over Wales after a consonant cluster (with l?):

    Google > gwglo [ˈɡuːɡlɔ]​

    signal > signlo [ˈsɪgnlɔ]​

    Sometimes it sounds more natural to use -u, like after words ending in -el or -ed:

    label > labelu S: [laˈbeːli], N: [laˈbɛlɨ̞]​

    level > lefelu S: [lɛˈveːli], N: [lɛˈvɛlɨ̞]​

    carped > carpedu S: [karˈpeːdi], N: [karˈpɛdɨ̞]​

    pocket > pocedu S: [pɔˈkeːdi], N: [pɔˈkɛdɨ̞]​

    When English has -ise/-ize, we often plump for -eiddio:

    normalise > normaleiddio [nɔrmaˈlei̯ðjɔ]​

    caramelise > carameleiddio [karamɛˈlei̯ðjɔ]​

    globalise > globaleiddio [ɡlɔbaˈlei̯ðjɔ]​

    But sometimes it doesn't correspond to -ise:

    animate > animeiddio [anɪˈmei̯ðjɔ]​
     
    Last edited:

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    In Spanish, we use -ear to form a verb from a loanword, e.g. hackear. This is from Vulgar Latin -idiāre/-izāre, and is cognate with Spanish -izar and English -ize.
    In Macedonian it is usually -ира (-ira).

    Examples: хакира (hákira), паркира (párkira), паузира (pauzíra), позира (pózira), компонира (komponíra), диригира (dirigíra), дрогира (drógira), нормализира (normalizíra), анимира (animíra), глобализира (globalizíra), анализира (analizíra), информира (informíra) etc.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top