verb+(to)

Unveiled

Member
Italian-Italy
Hi guys,

I've got some problems with verbs when they are followed by "to", as

want to
manage to
try to
.....


:confused: I never know when I have to put "to" after them...here are some examples, so that you can better understand what I mean:

#1 I wasn't able to do it, but I managed (to), I swear.
#2 They are about to go to the disco, but I'm not sure she really wants (to)... I know she doesn't like going to dance.

Can anyone tell me if a rule exists?



And what about have to??
#3 Altough you don't want to eat you know you have to. The doctor said you that.
I think in this case I have to put it after "have" because it is part of the verb...am I wrong?

;)
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Unveiled said:
    Hi guys,

    I've got some problems with verbs when they are followed by "to", as

    want to
    manage to
    try to
    .....


    :confused: I never know when I have to put "to" after them...here are some examples, so that you can better understand what I mean:

    #1 I wasn't able to do it, but I managed (to), I swear.
    #2 They are about to go to the disco, but I'm not sure she really wants (to)... I know she doesn't like going to dance.

    Can anyone tell me if a rule exists?



    And what about have to??
    #3 Altough you don't want to eat you know you have to. The doctor said you that.
    I think in this case I have to put it after "have" because it is part of the verb...am I wrong?

    ;)

    You need it in all of those examples. When you qualify an already mentioned verb by using another verb + the infinitive of the original verb, but don't want to repeat that verb, it is common to drop the infinitive but retain the "to" part of it.

    -I would like to renew my passport because I really need to.
    -He invited me to go to the movies with him but I didn't want to.

    ...and so on.
     

    Unveiled

    Member
    Italian-Italy
    elroy said:
    You need it in all of those examples. When you qualify an already mentioned verb by using another verb + the infinitive of the original verb, but don't want to repeat that verb, it is common to drop the infinitive but retain the "to" part of it.

    -I would like to renew my passport because I really need to.
    -He invited me to go to the movies with him but I didn't want to.

    ...and so on.


    Thanks! Another little question...could I invert the 2 parts of the sentence? For example:
    I didn't want to, but I had to go with him (anyway).
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Unveiled said:
    Thanks! Another little question...could I invert the 2 parts of the sentence? For example:
    I didn't want to, but I had to go with him (anyway).

    Yes, but it may be confusing because the "want to" may be misconstrued to refer to another, already mentioned verb. But if the context makes the meaning clear, then sure.
     

    Unveiled

    Member
    Italian-Italy
    elroy said:
    Yes, but it may be confusing because the "want to" may be misconstrued to refer to another, already mentioned verb. But if the context makes the meaning clear, then sure.


    Great. Really gentle, thanks Elroy.:)
     
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