Verbal animal derivatives

In Polish there are over hundred verbal animal derivatives (czasowniki „odzwierzęce”)
they belong to a group of derivatives onomasiological and are motivated by the observation of the world of nature or cultural , symbolic meaning of words constituting their word-forming bases.

zbaranieć = to be flabbergasted , baran (ram) : z+ baran+ ieć
osłupieć, oniemieć,

osowieć = to be dejected , sowa (owl) : o+sow+ ieć
posmutnieć, zmarkotnieć

zasępić się = to be distressed , sęp (vulture) : za+sęp+ ić się
spochmurnieć, zmartwić się, strapić się,

przekomarzać się = to banter with somebody , komar (mosquito) prze+ komar+ rzać się
droczyć się, drażnić się .

Do you have verbal animal derivatives in your language ?
 
  • Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Some in Spanish:

    Escarabajear=to tickle. Escarabajo=beetle.
    Gatear=to crawl. Gato=cat
    Grajear=to make gutural sounds (talking about a child that doesn't speak yet) Grajo=rook
    Marranear=to dirty. Marrano=pig
    Mosquear=to bother, to pester. Mosca=fly
    Perrear=to dance a couple with their bodies as close as possible and moving at the same time their hips. Perro=dog.
    Torear=to banter, to tease; symbolic meaning based in torear with the meaning of to bullfight. Toro=bull.
    Zorrear=to act with the care and inteligence of a fox. Zorro=fox
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Some in French:

    ânonner \ɑ.nɔ.ne\ = to read in a drone, to speak with no expression (for a child in school, or an actor on stage)
    from ânon = baby donkey

    canarder = to shoot, to snipe

    from canard = duck

    cavaler = to rush about

    from cheval = horse

    cochonner
    = to dirty, to botch
    from cochon = pig

    faisander = to hang, to tenderise (for a piece of hunted game)

    form faisan = pheasant

    fourmiller = to proliferate, to swarm
    from fourmi = ant

    fureter = to browse, to nose about

    from furet = ferret

    grenouiller = to indulge in shady dealings

    from grenouille = frog

    lézarder = to bask, to lounge

    from lézard = lizard

    moutonner = to become fleecy (for clouds especially)

    from mouton = sheep

    papillonner
    = to flicker, to flit from one thing/person to another
    from papillon = butterfly

    serpenter = to meander, to wind (for a road or a river)

    from serpent = snake

    singer \sɛ̃.ʒe\ = to ape, to mimic

    from singe \sɛ̃ʒ\ = ape, monkey

    zébrer = to streak

    from zèbre = zebra
     
    Last edited:

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    dog someone's steps = to follow someone closely
    bird-dog = to follow closely
    bitch = to complain
    pig out = to eat to excess
    duck = to bend or dodge suddenly
    rat (on) = to inform on
    frog = to rip out one or more rows of knitting (from the sound that a frog makes: ribbit/rippit)
    chicken out = to back out of something because of fear
    goose = to poke in the buttocks to startle
    skunk = to seriously defeat in a game; to prevent from scoring in a game
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Catalan:

    cabrejar [< cabra 'goat'] = (the sea) to form little waves of white foam
    caragolar [< caragol 'snail'] = to roll, to wind
    cavallejar [< cavall 'horse'] = to ride horses often | to look like a horse
    encolomar [< colom 'pigeon'] = to dump the responsibility of something (on somebody)
    esconillar-se [< conill 'rabbit'] = to run away in fear
    esparverar 1 and esparverar-se 2 [< esparver 'sparrowhawk'] = 1) to frighten; 2) to feel frightened/alarmed/very worried
    esquirolejar [< esquirol 'squirrel'] = to move nonstop to and fro
    formiguejar [< formiga 'ant'] = (legs, arms) to tingle | (people) to move (in large groups)
    furetejar [< fura 'ferret'] = to nose around thoroughly
    gallejar [< gall 'rooster'] = to show off
    gallinejar [< gallina 'hen'] = to procrastinate
    gatejar [< gat 'cat'] = to crawl, to move on all fours
    papallonejar [< papallona 'butterfly'] = to flicker, to flit from one thing/person to another
    porquejar [< porc 'pig'] = to make a filthy mess
    ratar [< rata 'rat'] = (cat, dog) to chase rats or mice | (rat, mouse) to gnaw
    serpejar [< serp 'snake'] or serpentejar [< serpent] = to meander
    talpejar [< talp 'mole'] = to grope around, to feel one's way
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Some more in Spanish:

    Apolillarse=to get old-fashioned. Polilla=moth.
    Caracolear= to caracole. Caracol=snail
    Gallear=to show off. Gallo=rooster.
    Gansear=to be proud of being funny and sharp without being it. Ganso=goose
    Hormiguear=to move a swarm. Hormiga=ant.
    Huronear=to pry into. Hurón=ferret
    Pajarear=to roam (absentminded). Pájaro=bird.
    Pavonear=to show off. Pavón=peacock
    Ratear=to act/be like a cheapskate. Rata=rat.
    Serpentear=to meander. Serpiente=serpent.
     
    Greek:

    • «Αλαφιάζω» [alaˈfçaz̠o̞] --> to panic, be scared stiff < dialectal name of deer, «αλάφι» [aˈlafi] (neut.) < Standard Modern Greek «ελάφι» [e̞ˈlafi] (neut.) < Byz.Gr. neuter diminutive «ἐλάφι(ο)ν» eláphi(o)n < Classical fem. noun «ἔλαφος» élăpʰŏs --> red deer.
    • «Αλεπουδίζω» [ale̞puˈðiz̠o̞] --> to act as a flirt or coquet < fem. noun «αλεπού» [ale̞ˈpu] --> fox < «*ἀλωπού» *alōpoú < Byz.Gr. fem. noun «ἀλωπώ» alōpṓ < Classical fem. noun «ἀλώπηξ» ălṓpēks (see below).
    • (Ancient Greek) «ἀλωπεύω» ălōpeúō --> to track, trace, detect, denominative from the Classical feminine noun «ἀλώπηξ» ălṓpēks --> fox.
    • (Αncient Greek) «ἀμνοκοέω» ămnŏkŏéō --> to be stupid like sheep, a compound: Classical masc. noun «ἀμνός» ămnós --> lamb + Classical v. «κοέω» kŏéō --> to know.
    • «Αμνοσκοπώ» [amno̞s̠ko̞ˈpo̞] (obsolete) --> to predict the future by readinɡ the bones of the lamb eaten at Easter, esp. its shoulder blade, a compound: «αμνός» [aˈmno̞s̠] (see above) + v. «σκοπώ» [s̠ko̞ˈpo̞] --> to examine < Classical v. «σκοπέω/σκοπῶ» skŏpéō (uncontracted)/skŏpô (contracted) --> to inspect, examine, look.
    • «Αναχαιτίζω» [anaçe̞ˈtiz̠ō] --> to intercept < Classical v. «ἀναχαιτίζω» ănăkʰaitízō --> to cast (the horseman) over the mane, to throw the mane back, overthrow, revolt, rebel, block, a compound: Classical prefix and preposition «ἀνά» ănắ + Classical fem. noun «χαίτη» kʰaítē --> horse's/lion's mane (PIE *ɡʰeh₂it- curly hair cf Av. ɡaēsa- curly hair, Middle Irish gaiset, bristly hair).
    • (Ancient Greek) «ἀνορταλίζω» ănŏrtălízō --> to prance, a compound: Classical prefix and preposition «ἀνά» ănắ + Classical fem. noun «ὀρταλίς» ŏrtălís --> hen (of unknown etymology).
    • (Ancient Greek) «ἀντιπελαργέω/ἀντιπελαργῶ» ăntĭpĕlărɡéō (uncontracted)/ăntĭpĕlărɡô (contracted) --> to show love in return (like storks do), a compound: prefix and preposition «ἀντί» ăntí + Classical masc. noun «πελᾱργός» pĕlārɡós --> (bird) stork.
    • «Αποχρέμπτομαι» [apo̞ˈxre̞mpto̞me] (deponent v.) --> to clear one's throat, couɡh up, spit, out < Classical deponent v. «ἀποχρέμπτομαι» ăpŏkʰrémptŏmai (idem), a compound: Classical prefix and preposition «ἀπό» ăpó + Classical neut. noun «χρέμμα» kʰrémmă --> horse's neiɡh, a deverbative from the v. «χρεμετίζω» kʰrĕmĕtízō --> to whinny, neiɡh (PIE *ɡʰrem- to resound, thunder, grumble, roar cf Proto-Germanic *ɡrimmaz > Enɡ. ɡrim).
    • (Αncient Greek) «ἀραχνάομαι/ἀραχνῶμαι» ărăkʰnắŏmai (uncontracted)/ărăkʰnômai (contracted) --> to weave like the spider < Classical fem. noun «ἀράχνη» ărắkʰnē --> spider.
      «Αραχνιάζω» [aɾaˈxɲaz̠o̞] --> to become covered in cobwebs, fill with cobwebs (usually through disuse or abandonment), metaph. to ɡet bored < fem. noun «αράχνη» [aˈɾaxni] --> spider < Classical fem. noun «ἀράχνη» ărắkʰnē (see above).
    • (Ancient Greek) «ἀρκτεύω» ărkteúō --> to serve goddess Artemis as a female bear < Classical fem. noun «ἄρκτος» ắrktŏs --> bear.
    • (Ancient Greek) «ἀρνεύω» ărneúō) to tumble, a denominative from the Classical masc. noun «ἀρνειός» ărneiós --> ram (PIE *h₂ers-n-i- ram cf Skt. वृष्णि (vṛṣṇi), Av. varšni-, ram). To tumble because the rams tumble while butting with the horns.
    • (Ancient Greek) «βρενθύνομαι» brĕntʰúnŏmai (deponent verb found only in present tense) --> to behave hauɡhtily < Classical masc. noun «βρένθος» bréntʰŏs --> a bird (waterbird/sinɡinɡ bird/blackbird dependinɡ on the reɡion) of unknown etymoloɡy.
    • «Γαϊδουρώνω» [ɣaɪðuˈɾo̞no̞] --> to be stubborn, determined, be unrelentinɡ < colloquial name in MoGr of donkey, jackass, «γαιδούρι» [ɣaɪˈðuɾi] (neut.) < Byz.Gr. «γαϊδάρι(ο)ν» gaidári(o)n (neut.) < Arab. غيذار (ghaydhaar), donkey.
    • (Ancient Greek) «γαλιάω» ɡăliắō --> to be licentious, intemperate < Classical fem. noun «γαλέη» ɡăléē --> weasel.
    • (Ancient Greek) «γαυριάω» ɡauriắō --> to bear oneself proudly, prance, be splendid < Classical masc. noun «γαῦρος» ɡaûrŏs --> anchovy (small fish) (PIE *ɡeh₂u-ro- denominative from the deponent v. «γάνυμαι» ɡắnŭmai, to brighten up, be glad, rejoice, from PIE *ɡeh₂u- to be briɡht, ɡlad).
    • «Γρομφάζω» [ɣro̞mˈfazo̞] --> to ɡrunt, denominative from the ancient name of the old female swine, «γρομφάς» ɡrŏmpʰắs (fem.), an onomatopoeia.
    • «Δαμαλίζω» [ðamaˈliz̠o̞] -->
    (1) to inoculate the mild cowpox virus into humans in order to confer immunity against the deadly smallpox virus < Classical masc. noun «δαμάλης» dămắlēs --> younɡ bull (PIE *demh₂- to tame cf Lat. damma, fallow deer).
    (2) (Ancient Greek) «δαμαλίζω» dămălízō --> to tame (from «δαμάλης» see above).
    • (Ancient Greek) «δελφινίζω» dĕlpʰĭnízō --> to dive like the dolphin < Classical masc. noun «δελφίς» dĕlpʰī́s --> dolphin.
    • (Ancient Greek) «δερκύλλειν» dĕrkúllein (found only in present tense, active infinitive) --> to drink blood < Classical fem. noun found only in nominative plural «δόρκαι» dórkai --> eggs of lice, fleas and bugs, nits (of unknown etymoloɡy).
    (End of Part 1)
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Pavonear=to show off. Pavón=peacock
    In French, we have pavaner with the same meaning, but oddly enough, the etymology is not clear, whether it is cognate with paon (peacock) through Spanish pavón, or with Italian pavana, shorter form of padovana, a dance from Padua.
     
    Greek (Part 2):

    • «Θεριεύω» [θe̞ˈrʝe̞vo̞] --> to fester < neut. «θηρίο» [θiˈɾi.o̞] and dialectal «θεριό» [θe̞ˈrʝo̞] < Byz.Gr. neuter diminutive «θηρίον» theríon of the Classical elaborate masc. or fem. noun «θήρ» tʰḗr --> wild beast, esp. lion.
    • «Καμηλίζω» [kamiˈliz̠o̞] --> to have an exaggerated forward rounding of the back, hump < fem. noun «καμήλα» [kaˈmila] < Classical masc. and fem. noun «κάμηλος» kắmēlŏs --> camel (a Semitic loan).
    • (Ancient Greek) «καριδόω/καριδῶ» kărĭdóō (uncontracted)/kărĭdô (contracted) --> to wriɡɡle like a shrimp < Classical fem. noun «κᾱρίς» kārís --> name of small crustaceans (of unknown etymoloɡy althouɡh its similarity to Arm. կարիճ (karich), scorpion is strikinɡ).
    • (Ancient Greek) active verb «καρκινόω/καρκινῶ» kărkĭnóō (uncontracted)/kărkĭnô (contracted) --> to crook one's finɡers; mediopassive verb «καρκινόομαι/καρκινοῦμαι» kărkĭnóŏmai (uncontracted)/kărkĭnoûmai (contracted) --> to suffer from cancer < Classical masc. noun «καρκίνος» kărkínŏs --> crab, (med.) cancer (of difficult etymoloɡy, obviously connected with Lat. cancer, crab, Skt. कर्कट (karkat̥a), crab but not all morphological details are clear).
    • «Κατσικώνομαι» [kat͡s̠iˈko̞no̞me̞] (deponent v.) --> to overstay, dig one's heels in, pester, become a pain in the rear < fem. noun «κατσίκα» [kaˈt͡s̠ika], the colloquial MoGr name of ɡoat < Turk. keçi [kʲeˈt͡ʃi], ɡoat.
    • (Ancient Greek) deponent verb «κεπφόομαι/κεπφοῦμαι» kĕppʰóŏmai (uncontracted)/kĕppʰoûmai (uncontracted) --> to be deceived easily < Classical masc. noun «κέπφος» képpʰŏs --> (bird) stormy petrel (the variant «κεμπός» kĕmpós with the prenasalisation suɡɡests Pre-Greek oriɡin).
    • (Ancient Greek) «κηλωνεύω» kēlōneúō --> to turn the swinɡ-beam, swipe < Classical masc. noun «κήλων» kḗlōn --> stallion, male ass < possibly from «κῆλα» kêlă (found only in neuter plural form), arrows, projectiles, which implies the animal's ɡenitalia, of unknown etymoloɡy.
    • (Αncient Greek) «κιγκλίζω» kĭnklízō --> to chanɡe constantly, from either (1) Classical masc. noun «κίγκλος» kínklŏs --> (bird) dabchick (for it constantly shakes its tail),
      or (2) Classical masc. noun «κίγκαλος» kínkălŏs --> a kind of fish with many colours (both names are Pre-Greek).
    • (Ancient Greek) «κιδαφεύω» kĭdăpʰeúō --> to play the knave < Classical masc. or fem. noun «κίδαφος» kídăpʰŏs --> fox (possibly Pre-Greek).
    • (Ancient Greek) «κιχλίζω» kĭkʰlízō --> to ɡiɡɡle < Classical fem. noun «κίχλη» kíkʰlē --> (bird) thrush (possibly Pre-Greek).
    • (Ancient Greek) «κναδάλλω» knădắllō and «κνήθω» knḗtʰō --> to ɡnaw < Classical neut. noun «κνώδαλον» knṓdălŏn --> wild or harmful animal (possibly Pre-Greek).
    • «Κοκορεύομαι» [ko̞ko̞ˈɾe̞vo̞me̞] (deponent v.) --> to braɡ, show off, vaunt < masc. noun «κόκορας» [ˈko̞ko̞ɾas̠] --> rooster, onomatopoeia from the rooster's crow «κοκορίκο» [ko̞ko̞ˈɾiko̞].
    • (Ancient Greek) deponent v. «κοδαλαύομαι» kŏdălaúŏmai --> to lie hidden < Classical neut. noun «κόδαλον» kódălŏn --> (fish) mullet (possibly Pre-Greek).
    • «Κορακιάζω» [ko̞ɾaˈcaz̠o̞] --> to be really thirsty, parched < masc. noun «κόρακας» [ˈko̞ɾakas̠] --> raven < Classical masc. noun «κόραξ» kórăks (see below).
    • (Ancient Greek) «κορακόω/κορακῶ» kŏrăkóō (uncontracted)/kŏrăkô (contracted) --> to lock (with a door-hook); «σκορακίζω» skŏrăkízō --> to chase away, revile; «κορωνιάω/κορωνιῶ» kŏrōnĭắō (uncontracted)/kŏrōnĭô(contracted) --> to bend the neck proudly, be proud < Classical masc. noun «κόραξ» kórăks --> (bird) raven and variant «κορώνη» kŏrṓnē --> (bird) sheerwater, crow.
    • «Κουβαριάζω» [kuvaˈrʝaz̠o̞] --> to spool, wind thread < Classical v. «κουβαρίζω» koubărízō --> to wind (somethinɡ) toɡether < Classical fem. noun «κουβαρίς» koubărís --> wood-louse (the insect (?) was called this way because it can roll itself together. The name itself remains unexplained).
    • (Ancient Greek) «κυνίζω» kŭnízō --> to live as a Cynic < Classical masc. and fem. noun «κύων» kúōn --> doɡ.
    End of Part 2
     
    Greek (Part 3):

    • «Λυσσάω» [liˈs̠a.o̞] --> to raɡe, rave < Classical v. «λυσσάω/λυσσῶ» lŭssáō (uncontracted)/lŭssô (contracted) --> to raɡe, rave, be mad < Classical fem. noun «λύσσα» lússă --> (martial) rage, fury, frenzy, (med.) rabies < Classical masc. noun «λύκος» lúkŏs --> wolf.
    • «Μουλαρώνω» [mulaˈɾo̞no̞] --> to be stubborn, diɡ in, refuse to chanɡe opinion < neut. noun «μουλάρι» [muˈlaɾi] --> mule < Byz.Gr. neuter diminutive «μουλάρι(ο)ν» moulári(o)n < earlier form «μοῦλος» moûlos (masc.), a borrowing that replaced in the vernacular the elaborate Classical native word for mule, «ἡμίονος» hēmíŏnŏs. «Μοῦλος» from the Latin mulus.
    • «Μυρμηγκιάζω» [mirmiɲˈɟaz̠o̠] --> to feel a prickly sensation, tinɡle < Classical v. «μυρμηκίζω» mŭrmēkízō --> to feel as though ants are running under the skin < Classical masc. noun «μύρμηξ» múrmēks --> ant.
    • «Μαϊμουδίζω» [maɪmuˈðizō] --> to mimic < fem. noun «μαϊμού» [maɪˈmu] --> monkey.
    • (Ancient Greek) deponent v. «μυόομαι/μυοῦμαι» mŭóŏmai (uncontracted)/mŭoûmai (contracted) --> to be muscular < Classical masc. noun «μῦς» mûs --> mouse.
    • (Ancient Greek) «νεβρίζω» nĕbrízō --> to wear a fawnskin < Classical masc. or fem. noun «νεβρός» nĕbrós --> young of the deer, fawn.
    • (Ancient Greek) «νεοσσεύω» nĕŏsseúō --> to breed, nestle < Classical masc. noun «νεοσσός» nĕŏssós --> younɡ bird, chick, also of other animals.
    • «Ολολύζω» [o̞lo̞ˈlizo̞] --> to cry either with jubilant voice or in lamentation, o-ɡrade of Classical masc. noun «ἐλεός» ĕlĕós --> a kind of owl (of unknown etymoloɡy).
    • (Ancient Greek) «ὀνεύω» ŏneúō --> to draw with a windlass, draw up < Classical masc. or fem. noun «ὄνος» ónŏs --> donkey, jackass.
    • (Ancient Greek) deponent verb «ὀρνεάζομαι» ŏrnĕắzŏmai --> to twitter, hold one's head up hiɡh < Classical neuter noun «ὄρνεον» órnĕŏn --> bird.
    • (Ancient Greek) «ὀρνιθεύω» ŏrnitʰeúō (active) --> to catch birds, «ὀρνιθεύομαι» ŏrnitʰeúŏmai (mediopassive) --> to watch the birds; «ὀρνίζω» ŏrnízō --> to twitter < Classical fem. noun «ὄρνῑς» órnis (see below).
    • «Ορνιθοσκαλίζω» [o̞rniθo̞s̠kaˈliz̠o̞] --> to scribble, write meaninɡless marks a compound: «όρνιθα» [ˈo̞rniθa] (fem.) --> hen < Classical fem. noun «ὄρνῑς» órnis --> (auɡural) bird, hen + v. «σκαλίζω» [s̠kaˈliz̠o̞] --> to carve, chisel, engrave, whittle, diɡ around < Classical v. «σκάλλω» skắllō.
    • (Ancient Greek) «ὀστρακίζω» ŏstrăkízō --> to write somebody's name on a potsherd and thus vote for his exile, ostracise, exile > MoGr «εξοστρακίζω» [e̞k͡s̠o̞s̠traˈciz̠o̞] (idem) a compound: Adv. «έξω» [ˈe̞k͡s̠o̞] --> out + v. «ὀστρακίζω» < Classical neut. noun «ὄστρακον» όstrăkŏn (see below).
    • (Ancient Greek) deponent v. «ὀστρακόομαι/ὀστρακοῦμαι» ŏstrăkóŏmai (uncontracted)/ŏstrăkoûmai (contracted) --> to crack into pieces, from «ὄστρακον» όstrăkŏn --> the hard shell of snails, mussels, turtles.
    • (Ancient Greek) «ὀστρειογράφω» ŏstreiŏɡrắpʰō --> to paint somethinɡ purple, a compound: Classical neut. noun «ὄστρειον» óstreiŏn --> oyster, marine gastropods of the genus Murex from which the ancients extracted purple pigment + Classical v. «γράφω» ɡrắpʰō --> to draw, sketch, paint, write
    End of Part 3
     
    Greek (Part 4):

    • «Παπαγαλίζω» [papaɣaˈliz̠o̞] --> to memorise, learn somethinɡ by heart, echo back somethinɡ to someone < masc. noun «παπαγάλος» [papaˈɣalo̞s̠] --> parrot < Ιt. papaɡallo < Byz.Gr. «παπαγᾶς» papaɡâs < Arab. ببغاء (babbaḡā), parrot.
    • «Πιθηκίζω» [piθiˈciz̠o̞] --> to ape someone < Classical v. «πιθηκίζω» pĭtʰēkízō --> to play the ape < Classical masc. noun «πίθηκος» pítʰēkŏs --> ape.
    • (Ancient Greek) «πορφυρεύω» pŏrpʰŭreúō --> to fish for purple snails from which purple piɡment is extracted < Classical fem. noun «πορφύρᾱ» pŏrpʰúrā --> purple snail (with no IE connections, could be a Mediterranean Wanderwort).
    • «Πουλεύω» [puˈle̞vo̞] --> to flee like a bird, disappear < neut. noun «πουλί» [puˈli], the ɡeneric name of bird in MoGr < Byz.Gr. neuter diminutive «πουλλί(ο)ν» poullí(o)n --> chick, younɡ of a bird < earlier form «ποῦλλος» poûllŏs < Lat. pullus.
    • (Ancient Greek) «προβατεύω» prŏbăteúō --> to keep, tend cattle or sheep < Classical neut. noun «πρόβατον» próbătŏn --> sheep, lit. ɡoinɡ sheep (PIE *pro-ɡʷeh₂- to ɡo with semantic coɡnates the Hitt. ii̯ant- ɡoinɡ sheep, Old Norse ɡanɡanda fé, ɡoinɡ cattle, livinɡ stock).
    • (Ancient Greek) «πωλεύω» pōleúō --> to break in a younɡ horse < Classical masc. noun «πῶλος» pôlŏs --> younɡ horse, foal, filly (PIE *plH- foal cf Skt. पोत (pota), young of an animal, Lat. puer, child).
    • «Ροχαλίζω» [ɾo̞xaˈliz̠o̞] --> to snore, o-grade of Classical v. «ῥέγχω» rʰénkʰō (idem), ablaut of Classical neut. noun «ῥύγχος» (see below).
    • (Αncient Greek) «ῥυγχάζω» rʰŭnkʰắzō --> to turn up the nose, sneer at < Classical neut. noun «ῥύγχος» rʰúnkʰŏs --> snout of a piɡ, beak (onomatopoeia, from the sound the piɡ makes *srunɡʰ- cf Arm. ռունգն (ṙungn), nostril).
    • (Ancient Greek) «ῥύζω» rʰúzō --> to ɡrowl, ɡrumble like the doɡ, skreak like the falcon < υ-vocalism of the v. «ῥάζω» rʰắzō (idem), onomatopoeia, from the sound of the ɡrumble of a doɡ.
    • (Ancient Greek) «ῥώχω» rʰṓkʰō --> to hiss, rattle like the snake (onomatopoeia, from the sound of the hissinɡ/rattling of the snake).
    • (Ancient Greek) «σητάω/σητῶ» sētắō (uncontracted)/sētô (contracted) --> to eat away, ɡnaw < Classical masc. noun «σής» sḗs --> moth, mite (of unclear etymoloɡy, could be IE with coɡnates the Arm. ցեց (ts'ets'), moth, Lat. tinea, moth, bookworm; could be a Semitic loan: Akk. sās-/sūs- moth, worm, Heb. עָשׁ ('ash), moth).
    • (Ancient Greek) «σιμβλεύω» sĭmbleúō --> to seek shelter < Classical fem. noun «σίμβλος» símblŏs --> beehive (of unknown oriɡin).
    • (Ancient Greek) «σκομβρίζω» skŏmbrízō --> to slap the buttocks < Classical masc. noun «σκόμβρος» skómbrŏs --> (fish) mackerel (of unknown oriɡin, possibly Pre-Greek).
    • «Σκορπίζω» [s̠ko̞rˈpiz̠o̞] --> to scatter < Classical v. «σκορπίζω» skŏrpízō (idem) < Classical masc. noun «σκορπίος» skŏrpíŏs (see below).
    • (Ancient Greek) deponent v. «σκορπιοῦμαι» skŏrpĭoûmai --> to be enraɡed, anɡry when provoked < Classical masc. noun «σκορπίος» skŏrpíŏs --> scorpion.
    • «Σκυλεύω» [sciˈle̞vo̞] --> to loot, plunder < Classical v. «σκυλεύω» skŭleúō --> to strip or despoil a slain enemy, esp. of his arms < Classical masc. noun «σκύλαξ» (see below).
    • «Σκυλιάζω» [sciˈʎaz̠o̞] --> to raɡe, frenzy, be ravinɡ mad, be obstinate < «σκύλος» [ˈscilo̞s] (masc.), the generic MoGr name for dog. It comes from the Koine masc. noun «σκύλαξ» skúlăks --> puppy.
    End of Part 4
     
    Greek (Final Part):

    • (Ancient Greek) «σκυμνεύω» skŭmneúō --> to breed < Classical masc. or fem. noun «σκύμνος» skúmnŏs --> cub, especially the younɡ lion (possibly Pre-Greek).
    • «Σκουληκιάζω» [s̠kuliˈcaz̠o̞] --> to be eaten by worms, infested with worms esp. food < neut. noun «σκουλήκι» [s̠kuˈlici] --> worm < Byz.Gr. neut. diminutive «σκουλήκι(ο)ν» skoulḗki(o)n, earlier form «σκωλήκι(ο)ν» skōlḗki(o)n (idem) < Classical masc. noun «σκώληξ» (see below).
    • (Ancient Greek) deponent verb «σκωληκίζομαι» skōlēkízŏmai --> to move or stir like worms < Classical masc. noun «σκώληξ» skṓlēks --> worm, larva.
    • (Ancient Greek) «σπαταγγίζω» spătănɡízō --> to aɡitate < Classical masc. noun «σπατάγγης» spătắnɡēs --> a kind of sea urchin (of unexplained etymoloɡy).
    • (Ancient Greek) «στρουθίζω» stroutʰízō --> to clean with soapwort < Classical masc. or fem. noun «στρουθός» stroutʰós --> (bird) sparrow (the variant forms «τρουθός» troutʰós and «δρουθός» droutʰós point to a Pre-Greek word).
    • «Στρουθοκαμηλίζω» [s̠truθo̞kamiˈliz̠o̞] --> to have the ostrich mentality, avoid neɡative information, have one's head in the sand < fem. noun «στρουθοκάμηλος» [s̠truθo̞ˈkamilo̞s̠] --> ostrich < Classical fem. noun «στρουθοκάμηλος» stroutʰŏkắmēlŏs (idem).
    • (Ancient Greek) active verb «Σφηκόω/σφηκῶ» spʰēkóō (uncontracted)/spʰēkô (contracted) --> to contract, bind; mediopassive verb «σφηκόομαι/σφηκοῦμαι» spʰēkóŏmai (uncontracted)/spʰēkoûmai (contracted) --> to be contracted, bound in the middle < Classical fem. noun «σφήξ» spʰḗks --> wasp.
    • (Ancient Greek) «τετράζω» tĕtrắzō --> to cackle < Classical masc. noun «τέτραξ» tétrăks --> (bird) ɡuinea-fowl (onomatopoeic with semantic coɡnates the Skt. तितिरि (titiri), partridɡe, Proto-Slavic *tetervь, ɡrouse).
    • «Τιθασεύω» [tiθaˈs̠e̞vo̞] --> to tame < Classical v. «τιθασεύω» tĭtʰăseúō (idem) < Classical adj. «τιθασός» tĭtʰăsós --> the tamed, domesticated animal (possibly Pre-Greek).
    • (Ancient Greek) deponent verb «τραγικεύομαι» trăɡĭkeúŏmai --> to speak as in a traɡedy; «τραγίζω» trăɡízō --> to speak rouɡly; «τραγάω/τραγῶ» trăɡắō (uncontracted)/trăɡô (contracted) --> to grow over-luxuriant < Classical masc. noun «τράγος» trắɡŏs --> billy-ɡoat.
    • (Ancient Greek) «ὑίζω hŭízō --> to cry like the piɡ < Classical fem. or masc. noun «ὗς» hûs --> swine, piɡ, hoɡ, boar.
    • «Φιδιάζω» [fiˈðʝaz̠o̞] --> to bum around, shirk, skive, scrimshank < neut. noun «φίδι» [ˈfiði] --> snake, aphetism and apocope of the Byz. Gr. neut. diminutive «ὀφίδιον» ophídion --> snake < Classical masc. noun «ὄφις» ópʰĭs --> snake.
    • (Αncient Greek) deponent v. «φριμάσσομαι» pʰrĭmắssŏmai --> to snort with lust for life, behave unruly, of horses, goats (of unknown etymoloɡy, connected with «βρίμη» brímē (fem.), bellowinɡ, roarinɡ, miɡht, power).
    • (Ancient Greek) «χελιδονίζω» kʰĕlĭdŏnízō --> to speak unintelliɡibly, speak like a barbarian < Classical fem. noun «χελῑδών» kʰĕlīdṓn --> (bird) swallow.
    • «Ψαρώνω» [p͡saˈɾo̞no̞] (ambitransitive v.) --> to bamboozle someone, cower, fall for somethinɡ < neut. noun «ψάρι» [ˈp͡saɾi] --> fish, aphetism of the Byz.Gr. neut. diminutive «ὀψάρι(ο)ν» opsári(o)n --> fish < Classical neut. noun «ὄψον» ópsŏn --> side dish; the name «ὄψον» became gradually synonymous with the fish-dish and eventually with fish in general (PIE *h₁op-s- side-food cf Lat. opsōnium, anything eaten with bread to give it relish, especially fish).
    • «Ψειρίζω» [p͡s̠iˈɾiz̠o̞] --> to nitpick, fuss over someone/somethinɡ, pick holes < fem. noun «ψείρα» [ˈp͡s̠iɾa] --> louse < Βyz.Gr. feminine noun «ψεῖρα» pseîra, earlier form «φθεῖρα» phtheîra, contaminated with the name of flea, «ψύλλᾱ» (see below) < Classical fem. noun «φθείρ» pʰtʰeír --> louse.
    • «Ψυλλιάζομαι» [p͡s̠iˈʎaz̠o̞me̞] (deponent v.) --> to be on to somebody, suspect < masc. noun «ψύλλος» [ˈp͡s̠ilo̞s̠] --> flea < Classical fem. noun «ψύλλᾱ» psúllā, secondary masc. formation «ψύλλος» psúllŏs --> flea (PIE *p/bl(o)u-s- flea cf Skt. प्लुषि (pluṣi), a species of noxious insect, Lat. pūlex, Proto-Germanic *flauhaz > Eng. flea).
     
    Hello, is there any website I can check all those derivatives or at least 80-100 of them? Thanks. Enco.

    Obecność czasowników „odzwierzęcych” w polszczyźnie stanowi ciekawy, nieopracowany dotąd szczegółowo, obszar leksyki polskiej. Jak pisze Tadeusz Lewaszkiewicz, zapowiadając jednocześnie zamiar monograficznego opracowania powyższego zagadnienia, „dawne i współczesne piśmiennictwo polskie, gwary i różne odmiany języka potocznego poświadczają istnienie ponad 100 podstawowych czasowników odzwierzęcych” , zaś przy uwzględnieniu form prefiksalnych oraz imiesłowów przymiotnikowych i rzeczowników odczasownikowych liczba tych form wzrasta do kilkuset..

    The presence of verbal animal derivatives in Polish is an interesting, inapprocessed in detail, the area of the Polish lexician. As Tadeusz Lewaszkiewicz writes, at the same time announcing the intention of the monographic development of the above issue, "former and contemporary Polish literature, the guarantee and various varieties of colloquial language certify the existence of over 100 basic verbs", and taking into account the prefixic forms and adjectival parteciple and gerund, mumber of these forms increases to several hundred ...

    Source ;

    Czasownikowe derywaty odzwierzęce w polszczyźnie historycznej i ich funkcja w wierszu Juliana Tuwima Figielek - t. 15, 2016 - Studia Językoznawcze - Wydawnictwo Naukowe Uniwersytetu Szczecińskiego
     
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    Verbal animal derivatives , some of them are quite rare , and the other ones are just funny , in any case they really enriches and deepens , that's why we use them quite often in Polish language.:)


    ślimaczyć się = robić powoli = to take things slow. ślimak = snail
    szarogęsić się = wynosić się nad kogoś, rządzić się = bossy , boss around. szara gęś = grey goose
    psioczyć = krytykować, marudzić = criticise ,grizzle ,dilly-dally. pies = dog
    byczyć się = leniuchować, nic nie robić = laze , laze about. byk = bull
    słaniać się = chwiać się na nogach = stagger. słoń = elephant
    zbaranieć = osłupieć, oniemieć = to be flabbergasted. baran = ram
    osowieć = posmutnieć, zmarkotnieć = to be dejected. sowa = owl
    zasępić się = spochmurnieć, zmartwić się, strapić się= to be distressed. sęp=vulture
    przekomarzać się = droczyć się, drażnić się = to banter with somebody. komar =mosquito
    raczyć się = pić ze smakiem, jeść ze smakiem = savour , deligt in. rak = cancer
    zajęczeć = wydać z siebie jęk = groan . zając = hare
    świntuszyć = be obscene , talk dirty. świnia = pig , swine.
    myszkować = szukać = look for , search. myszka = mouse
    chomikować = chować coś na zapas, często niepotrzebnie = stash , hoard. chomik=hamster
    jeżyć się = złościć się na kogoś = get angry at smb. jeż = hedgehog
    rozwydrzyć się = rozpuścić się, o dziecku = spoil. wydra = otter
    papugować = naśladować kogoś = imitate , mimic. papuga = parrot
    małpować = naśladować kogoś, przedrzeźniać = mock, mimic , imitate. małpa = monkey
    zacietrzewiać się = wpaść w gniew, uparcie bronić swoich racji = to get angry , stubbornly defend own rights.
    cietrzew =blackcock
    gzić się = współżyć seksualnie , figlować, zbytkować, swawolić. = romp, frolic. giez = cattle grub (Hypoderma bovis)
    podkukułczyć =??
    stchórzyć = dostać cykora = chicken , funk . tchórz = coward
    wtrusiać = wyżerać/wyżreć ,zajadać zajadać się.= hork down, dig in. struś = ostrich
    pawić się =puszyć ś., kokoszyć ś., nadymać ś., pysznić się= strut , plume, swank. paw = peacock
    uczapllć się = usiąść niezdarnie jak czapla= sit down clumsily. czapla = heron
    zborsuczyć się = zepsuć, zniszczyć; dać plamę, skompromitować (się) = foul, lay an egg. borsuk = badger
    (za)indyczyć się = okazywać gniew z błahych powodów = to get angry for trivial reasons. indyk = turkey
    kurczyć = zmniejszać przez ściąganie, podkulanie = shrink , dwindle. kurczę = darn
    kozłować =prowadzić piłkę, , o samolocie: podskakiwać przy lądowaniu = dribble . kozioł = trestle
    kurzyć = podnosić tumany kurzu = get dusty . kura = hen.
    zwilczyć się = zdziczeć = run wild. wilk = wolf
    zlisić się = zrazić (się), zniechęcić (się), odstręczyć = alienate ,repulse ,daunt. lis = fox
    bobrować = grzebać gdzieś, szperać ,przewracać coś w poszukiwaniu czegoś = fumble , rummage, rootle. bóbr=beaver
    wydudkać = pozbawić kogoś pieniędzy; oskubać = fleece , skin. dudek = hoopoe
    skocurzyć się = zwinąć się jak kocur = curl ,wrinkle up. kocur = moggie
    skundlić się = wśród policjantów synonim współpracy z przestępcami=among the policemen of the synonym of cooperation with criminals. kundel = scrub
    zepsieć, zepsić się = spodleć, wyrodzić ś., znikczemnieć. = become nefarious , viciouc , low. pies = dog
    capić = śmierdzieć = stink. cap = he-goat.
    gawronić = gapić się, patrzeć bezmyślnie, głupowato. = gape , gape at , gawk. gawron = grackle
    łasić się = przymilać się.= fawn. łasica = least weasel.
     
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    Some in French:

    ânonner \ɑ.nɔ.ne\ = to read in a drone, to speak with no expression (for a child in school, or an actor on stage)
    from ânon = baby donkey

    canarder = to shoot, to snipe

    from canard = duck

    cavaler = to rush about

    from cheval = horse

    cochonner
    = to dirty, to botch
    from cochon = pig

    faisander = to hang, to tenderise (for a piece of hunted game)

    form faisan = pheasant

    fourmiller = to proliferate, to swarm
    from fourmi = ant

    fureter = to browse, to nose about

    from furet = ferret

    grenouiller = to indulge in shady dealings

    from grenouille = frog

    lézarder = to bask, to lounge

    from lézard = lizard

    moutonner = to become fleecy (for clouds especially)

    from mouton = sheep

    papillonner
    = to flicker, to flit from one thing/person to another
    from papillon = butterfly

    serpenter = to meander, to wind (for a road or a river)

    from serpent = snake

    singer \sɛ̃.ʒe\ = to ape, to mimic

    from singe \sɛ̃ʒ\ = ape, monkey

    zébrer = to streak

    from zèbre = zebra
    Merci je voudrais les traduire et les confronter ;

    Polish

    ânonner = dukać , bąkać , bąknąć from bąk = taon , horsefly
    canarder = kiksować
    cavaler = biegać , gonić
    cochonner = spartaczyć , knocić
    faisander = zawiesić
    fourmiller = mrowić , mrowienie from mrówka = fourmi ,ant
    fureter = węszyć
    grenouiller = chlapać
    lézarder = leniuchować
    moutonner = kędzierzawić, kłębić
    papillonner = trzepotać się
    serpenter = wić się
    zébrer = pręgować
     
    Italian

    accanire = far irritare come un cane , imbestialirsi furiosamente.
    accanare = inseguire o perseguitare con i cani.
    accaprettare, incaprettare = legare insieme le quattro zampe d’un quadrupede.
    accavallare = mettere una cosa sopra un’altra, sovrapporre.
    gattonare = muoversi carponi, avanzando con le mani e con i piedi .
    lumacare = muoversi a fatica, lentamente.
    allupare = diventare o essere bramoso, alluppato = affamato
    arricciare = piegare, avvolgere in forma di riccio.
    avvolpacchiarsi = confondersi, imbrogliarsi nel parlare.
    cavalcare = andare a cavallo, viaggiare a cavallo , montare un c.
    chiocciare = stare rannicchiato, accoccolato come fa la chioccia.
    cicalare = parlare a lungo e noiosamente di cose frivole.
    civettare = cercare di attirare l’attenzione, farsi corteggiare.
    formicolare = brulicare , provare sensazione di formicolìo.
    gattigliare = altercare, litigare in maniera volgare e pungente.
    gracidare = chiacchierare di cose futili, e con voce stridula e fastidiosa.
    gracchiare = cianciare in modo importuno e con voce sgradevole, brontolare, sparlare.
    grillare = chiacchierare a vuoto , detto del vino grillare , gorgogliare.
    avere i grilli = cioè capricci, ghiribizzi.
    gufare = portare sfortuna.
    gufeggiàre = vivere da misantropo, poco socievole, chiuso ai contatti umani.
    impaperarsi = imbrogliarsi nel parlare, facendo delle papere.
    inasinire = diventare asino, ignorante.
    incartapecorire = pelle umana, diventare gialla, secca, grinzosa come cartapecora, per malattia o vecchiezza.
    intorarsi = diventare furioso, o forte, vigoroso, robusto come un toro; anche, ostinarsi caparbiamente, rabbiosamente.
    lupeggiare = muoversi con circospetta determinazione, come il lupo quando caccia.
    pavoneggiarsi = assumere un atteggiamento superbo e vanitoso come quello del pavone.
    scimmiottare = imitare, riprodurre in modo goffo e pedestre comportamenti o atteggiamenti altrui.
    sfarfallare = svolazzare qua e là come una farfalla, tremolare, variare rapidamente di intensità luminosa.
    sgattaiolare = entrare, uscire quatto quatto, in silenzio e con sveltezza, cercando di passare inosservato.
    sgranchire = distendere, stirare gli arti aggranchiti o intorpiditi dal freddo o dall’immobilità, muoversi, svegliarsi.
    tigrare = macchiare, macchiarsi di strisce scure simili a quelle del mantello della tigre.
    volpeggiare = fare la volpe, usare un’astuzia sorniona.
    zebrare = striare, attraversare una superficie con strisce più scure.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Nothing of that kind in Dutch, it seems to me. (Reminds me of metaphorical verbs based on nouns referring to every-day things, a thread I opened here. We do have a literal meaning, like vloeren (to build a floor, like what a builder does, or to throw someone on the floor), nothing metaphorical however, as far as I can see.)
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Well, it may seem strange, but we cannot katten, honden, paarden, koeien, really. We do compare with animals: a memory like, hunger like a ..., etc., but as far as I can see now: no verbal derivations based on animals!!!
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    (* = BrE only, as far as I know)

    to ape = to copy, to imitate
    to squirrel (away) = to store, hide money, etc.
    to fox = to trick, perplex, confound, etc.
    to swan (about, around)* = to wander idly
    to beaver (away at)* = to work very hard on something
    to wolf = to eat very greedily or quickly
    to bug = to annoy, pester
    to hog = to take more than one's share, to monopolise
    to monkey (around) = to play idly or foolishly
    to worm = to move slowly, etc.
    to crow = to gloat, boast, exult
    to winkle = to prise something out of a place
    to clam up = to refuse to talk
    to fish = to draw or pull out, as if fishing
    to badger = to harass or annoy persistently
    to hound = to persecute, harass
     
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    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    I suddenly notice that there is one I could add from Dutch, but na-apen consists of after and ape, so again a lot of the content is not in the animal's name, rather in the prefix! As I said, we will generally use expressions containing a reference to the animal...
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Does any language have a verb derived from the word “animal”?
    In Palestinian Arabic بِتْحَيْوَنْ, literally “to animal,” means “to be an asshole / a jerk.”
     
    Does any language have a verb derived from the word “animal”?
    In Palestinian Arabic بِتْحَيْوَنْ, literally “to animal,” means “to be an asshole / a jerk.”
    Greek has a few compound verbs with beast:
    (1) the mediopassive MoGr v. «αποκτηνώνομαι» [apo̞ktiˈno̞no̞me̞] (Demotic with dissimilation «αποχτηνώνομαι» [apo̞xtiˈno̞no̞me̞]) --> to become brutal, coarsen, dehumanised, a compound: ΜοGr prefix and preposition «από» [aˈpo̞] --> from, out of, de- < Classical prefix and preposition «ἀπό» ăpó + MoGr neut. noun «κτήνος» [ˈktino̞s̠] (and with dissimilation «χτήνος» [ˈxtino̞s̠]) --> beast, animal, metaphorically, monster < Classical deverbative neuter noun «κτῆνος» ktênŏs --> domestic animal, livestock < Classical deponent v. «κτάομαι/κτῶμαι» ktắŏmai (uncontracted)/ktômai (contracted).
    (2) the Classical mediopassive v. «ἐκθηριόομαι/-οῦμαι» ĕktʰērĭóŏmai (uncontracted)/ĕktʰērĭoûmai (contracted) --> become quite wild or savage, a compound: Classical prefix and preposition «ἐκ» ĕk + Classical neut. noun «θηρίον» tʰēríŏn --> wild animal, beast.
    Verbs with «θηρίον» as second member in compounds in Ancient Greek: «ἐκθηράομαι/ἐκθηροῦμαι» = to hunt out, catch, «ἐκθηρεύω» = to hunt out, «ἀποθηριόω/-θηριῶ» = to become a beast.
     
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    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Standard Arabic has

    يتذبذب /jataðabðab/, to vibrate
    and
    ذبابة /ðuba:ba/, fly (animal)

    I don’t know if the verb is derived from the noun, or if they just share a root. @Wadi Hanifa?
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    This is totally random, but I said this word to myself and I realized it sounds like אני מה לי זה in Hebrew, which translates to “Me, what is mine? This.” :D
    Does it really sound close to \a.ni.ma.li.ze\? :eek:
     

    Wadi Hanifa

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    Standard Arabic has

    يتذبذب /jataðabðab/, to vibrate
    and
    ذبابة /ðuba:ba/, fly (animal)

    I don’t know if the verb is derived from the noun, or if they just share a root. @Wadi Hanifa?

    I don’t know, but I would think it more likely that the noun came first, don’t you think?

    Arabic is full of these types of words.
    A nice one from our traditional dialacts is the verb تهايق tahaayag, meaning to stick one’s neck out over a crowd or wall to get a better look. It comes from هيق hayq (heeg), an old Arabic word for ‘ostrich’.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I would think it more likely that the noun came first, don’t you think?
    My first thought was that they simply share a root, but then I thought, like you, that the verb probably came from the noun. I think saying "make like a fly" for "vibrate" is quite imaginative! Your ostrich one is cool too.
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    my Spanish does not allow me to get the precise point of meaning @2 of animalizar.
    Convertir en ser animal = to convert into an animal being.
    It means: to transform (a human especially) metaphorically into an animal, to reduce to a beast (e.g. by slavery or deprivation).
    There may be more positive meanings: to reveal one's own animal part (e.g. for an artistic purpose).
     
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    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Thanks! I had been wondering whether "ser" meant "to be" and how one could fit it in, but now it is clear. But again: nothing of the kind. I wonder whether German has more of those, but I do not think so: I have never met any of those, I think...
     
    Does any language have a verb derived from the word “animal”?
    In Palestinian Arabic بِتْحَيْوَنْ, literally “to animal,” means “to be an asshole / a jerk.”

    In Polish there exists: zezwierzęcenie from zezwierzęcieć (verb) = stan osoby, która zezwierzęciała, stała się okrutna, zdemoralizowana, pozbawiona cech człowieczeństwa. = a state of person who has become cruel, perverted, dehumanised..

    Ty bydlaku = you bastard

    bydło = cattle , beeves

    synonyms : zdziczenie , dzikość , bestialstwo , zbydlęcenie.
     
    Greek has a few compound verbs with beast:
    (1) the mediopassive MoGr v. «αποκτηνώνομαι» [apo̞ktiˈno̞no̞me̞] (Demotic with dissimilation «αποχτηνώνομαι» [apo̞xtiˈno̞no̞me̞]) --> to become brutal, coarsen, dehumanised, a compound: ΜοGr prefix and preposition «από» [aˈpo̞] --> from, out of, de- < Classical prefix and preposition «ἀπό» ăpó + MoGr neut. noun «κτήνος» [ˈktino̞s̠] (and with dissimilation «χτήνος» [ˈxtino̞s̠]) --> beast, animal, metaphorically, monster < Classical deverbative neuter noun «κτῆνος» ktênŏs --> domestic animal, livestock < Classical deponent v. «κτάομαι/κτῶμαι» ktắŏmai (uncontracted)/ktômai (contracted).
    (2) the Classical mediopassive v. «ἐκθηριόομαι/-οῦμαι» ĕktʰērĭóŏmai (uncontracted)/ĕktʰērĭoûmai (contracted) --> become quite wild or savage, a compound: Classical prefix and preposition «ἐκ» ĕk + Classical neut. noun «θηρίον» tʰēríŏn --> wild animal, beast.
    Verbs with «θηρίον» as second member in compounds in Ancient Greek: «ἐκθηράομαι/ἐκθηροῦμαι» = to hunt out, catch, «ἐκθηρεύω» = to hunt out, «ἀποθηριόω/-θηριῶ» = to become a beast.
    In Polish we use bestialstwo, zdziczenie (bestiality , inhumanity) (gr. θηριότης, theriotes) .
     
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    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    I don’t know, but I would think it more likely that the noun came first, don’t you think?
    Actually, ذباب and ذبذب are two different roots. الذبابة is from the root ذ ب ب while ذبذب is from ذ ب ذ ب. I understand that the four letter root is probably derived from the three letter one, but it just means that they are unlikely to be directly related.

    The verb ذبّ means to push away or protect (ذبّ الشيء = push it away, ذبّ عن الشيء = to protect it).

    I can’t say for sure, but it seems to me that the verb came first and the fly was called so because it annoys us and we tend to push it away. Dictionaries don’t specify so I’m just guessing here.
     
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