verbo doctrinae et exemplo

lucerna lucens inmundo et ardens, nec sub modio sed super candelabrum posita, illuminabat corda non credentium verbo doctrinae et exemplo.

A lamp shining in the world and burning not under a bowl but placed on a candlestick, he had brightened the hearts of the believers not with word or example of teaching.

Not sure if my translation is correct.
 
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  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Generally, it looks fine to me, but why are you translating this as a negative?
    .. not with word or example of teaching.

    (I would translate verbo doctrinae together: "with/by word of <the?> doctrine and example.")
     

    Quiviscumque

    Moderator
    Spanish-Spain
    lucerna lucens inmundo et ardens, nec sub modio sed super candelabrum posita, illuminabat corda non credentium verbo doctrinae et exemplo.

    A lamp shining in the world and burning not under a bowl but placed on a candlestick, he (had) brightened the hearts of the NON believers (not) with word OF TEACHING AND WITH EXAMPLE.



    Not sure if my translation is correct.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    The sentence is echoing the language of the Bible, and it would therefore be appropriate in English, while retaining accuracy, to echo traditional phraseology.

    lucerna lucens in mundo et ardens, nec sub modio sed super candelabrum posita, illuminabat corda non credentium verbo doctrinae et exemplo.

    A burning and a shining light in the world, placed not under a bushel but upon a lamp-stand, he proceeded to enlighten the hearts of unbelievers by the word of his teaching and by his example.

    in mundo has to be two words.
    modius is a measure of corn, and a substantial one. The traditional English Biblical term is 'bushel'.
    candelabrum can also mean 'lamp-stand', which makes better sense here, being that much larger than a candlestick.
    illuminabat is imperfect tense ('imperfect': uncompleted action) and literally means 'was enlightening'.
    Usually, this tense is best translated by the English past continuous. Sometimes the simple past is appropriate.
    Sometimes, on the other hand, it describes a continuous action, carried on from the point of commencement and not yet completed. This is called the inceptive use of the imperfect.
    That may be the meaning here, if it is depicting the start of his teaching and practice.
    In this case, it means 'began to enlighten' or 'proceeded to enlighten'.
    I have taken it in this sense, but only the context can show if that is correct.
     
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