Verbos coloquiales

A ver si alguien conoce los equivalentes ingleses de los siguientes verbos coloquiales españoles:

-palmarla (morir)
-liñarla (morir)
-currar (trabajar)
-sobar (dormir)
-cargarse (matar/romper)
 
  • belén

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain, Catalan, Mallorca
    sólo me sé una pero de "palmarla" debe haber miles

    estirar la pata : to kick the bucket
     

    Zuri

    Member
    UK / English
    Hola. En Inglaterra:

    -palmarla (morir) = to snuff it (to kick the bucket, to pop one's clogs... hay muchas frases para eso).
    Ese viejo vecino tuyo la palmó anoche - That old neighbour of yours snuffed it last night.

    - sobar (dormir) = to kip (to go for / have a kip)
    Me las piro a sobar = I'm off for a kip.

    - cargarse = (matar) = to knock off
    Se han cargado a ese tío de tu calle - They've knocked off that guy from your street.

    Espero que ayude.
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Zuri said:
    Hola. En Inglaterra:

    -palmarla (morir) = to snuff it (to kick the bucket, to pop one's clogs... hay muchas frases para eso).
    Ese viejo vecino tuyo la palmó anoche - That old neighbour of yours snuffed it last night.

    - sobar (dormir) = to kip (to go for / have a kip)
    Me las piro a sobar = I'm off for a kip.

    - cargarse = (matar) = to knock off
    Se han cargado a ese tío de tu calle - They've knocked off that guy from your street.

    Espero que ayude.
    Sorry Zuri, but I'm states-side. What is a kip?

    EDIT: I searched. A "kip" is a "nap". :thumbsup: :p
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    Zuri said:
    Hola. En Inglaterra:

    -palmarla (morir) = to kick the bucket, to pass on

    - sobar (dormir) = to get some shut-eye, take a little nap, to go count some sheep

    - cargarse = (matar) = to knock off, to whack, give someone a dirt nap, give someone a bath with lead boots
    Here are some that are familiar to me. (AM ENG)
     

    Zuri

    Member
    UK / English
    Hi Venus.
    "To kip" is another way of saying "to sleep".
    "A kip" could be defined as something like "a nap".
    I included those words because Henrik was looking for colloquially-used verbs to match the ones they use in Spain (e.g: "sobar" instead of "dormir", "currar" instead of "trabajar", etc).
    Saludos.
     

    Michael Burt

    New Member
    England/English
    cuchuflete said:
    Algunas más:
    to croak
    to start a worm farm
    to buy the farm
    to drop dead
    to give his last gasp

    C.
    ¡Hola todos!

    Algunas mas en inglés britaníco:

    palmarla - to cash in one's chips

    sobar - to have (go for, take) a snooze, to have (take) forty winks

    cagarse - to terminate, to bump off, to ice

    Espero que se haya ayudado.

    Michael
     

    lainyn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Para morir:

    to give up the ghost
    to go to meet the grim reaper
    to go to meet your Maker (Dios).
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    lainyn said:
    Para morir:

    to give up the ghost

    I had to think about this one. I've never heard it used to refer to a person dying. I've heard this to refer to something else, as in quitting trying to figure out how to do something or something stops working.

    "I spent hours trying to fix my computer but I finally gave up the ghost."

    "The toaster was working for a while but I think it's finally given up the ghost."

    Does anyone else have this same understanding or am I completely wrong?
     

    Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    jacinta said:
    I had to think about this one. I've never heard it used to refer to a person dying. I've heard this to refer to something else, as in quitting trying to figure out how to do something or something stops working.

    "I spent hours trying to fix my computer but I finally gave up the ghost."

    "The toaster was working for a while but I think it's finally given up the ghost."

    Does anyone else have this same understanding or am I completely wrong?

    I, for one, have heard it used for to die. But it may be archaic (like me). Google quickly locates the following:

    To give up the ghost: To die, or in the case of inanimate objects, to cease working.

    Origin: From The Bible, Acts 12. 'And immediately the angel of the Lord smote him, because he gave not God the glory: and he was eaten of worms, and gave up the ghost.'

    Source: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/155500.html
     

    Michael Burt

    New Member
    England/English
    jacinta said:
    I had to think about this one. I've never heard it used to refer to a person dying. I've heard this to refer to something else, as in quitting trying to figure out how to do something or something stops working.

    "I spent hours trying to fix my computer but I finally gave up the ghost."

    "The toaster was working for a while but I think it's finally given up the ghost."

    Does anyone else have this same understanding or am I completely wrong?
    Hi Jacinta

    "I spent hours trying to fix my computer but I finally gave up the ghost."

    This doesn't sound quite right to me in British English. The computer may finally have given up the ghost, but the worst thing that might have happened to me is that finally I tore my hair out (what little remains), i.e. I lost patience with the wretched computer. Your second example sounds fine.

    Regards

    Michael
     

    gotitadeleche

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    jacinta said:
    I had to think about this one. I've never heard it used to refer to a person dying. I've heard this to refer to something else, as in quitting trying to figure out how to do something or something stops working.

    "I spent hours trying to fix my computer but I finally gave up the ghost."

    "The toaster was working for a while but I think it's finally given up the ghost."

    Does anyone else have this same understanding or am I completely wrong?
    I have never heard it with your definition. To me, it means to die (animate) or to stop working (inanimate).
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top