veritable charter

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carolmoraiss

Banned
Portuguese
Hi,

Does anyone know what a "veritable charter" means? Is it something like an official document or letter?

"The French delegates to the International’s meetings of 1866 in Geneva, led by Tolain, carried with them a veritable charter for Proudhonism and mutualism, thus testifying to the deep hold of such ideas over craft worker consciousness." - Paris, Capital of Modernity

Thank you!
 
  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    I'm not surprised you're confused. This is, I believe, a misuse of "veritable", which usually means "real" or "genuine". A charter here means a founding document for an organisation, but I suspect that it doesn't really mean that they literally brought a charter, even if they in fact did. In my opinion it means that they were so well prepared, it's as if they had written a constitution for the movement, based on Proudhonism and mutualism.
     

    carolmoraiss

    Banned
    Portuguese
    Ohhh... I do understand what you are saying, and it does make sense. But this Geneva meeting was, I guess, the first of the International. So, maybe, they really brought a document. God knows, perhaps a letter of principles...
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    That's why I said they may well have actually had a charter: I just don't think that the phrase means this. We often use "veritable" in the way I described (that is to make a slightly exaggerated claim). He's a veritable mine of information / She's a veritable national treasure

    Edit : cross-posted. I agree with Myridon
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    This is, I believe, a misuse of "veritable", which usually means "real" or "genuine".
    It often means "metaphorical." Her shopping cart was a veritable cornucopia of vegetables. It wasn't an actual cornucopia but it was overflowing with food like a cornucopia.
     

    carolmoraiss

    Banned
    Portuguese
    Got it, Glanguensis. So I guess they were full of Proudhonist and mutualist ideas. I'll try to think of a better metaphor for this...
     
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