vestirse con el silbato

tuzi

Senior Member
Chinese
hi, I read this interview of Diego Simeone, where he saids:"Y terminamos en Racing, me duché un sábado a la tarde que jugamos contra Estudiantes de la Plata, con el que luego fui campeón, y al domingo por la mañana me vestí ya con el silbato con los mismos compañeros, pero sabía que lo podíamos sacar adelante."

I am quite confused with "me vestí ya con el silbato" on this sentence, does it really means "I put on the whistle" ?? but how to understand it in this context?

here is the original article: Simeone: “Puedo ser mal entrenador, pero tonto no soy”

thank you.
 
  • johnnylavid

    Member
    Spanish Spain
    A match or competition, probably a football match, is about to start (or finish). "con el silbato" means when the whistle (to start or finish a competition) is already being blown. So, I dressed (put on my clothes) when the whistle was already being blown, or an elaboration on this.
     

    Magazine

    Senior Member
    Español-España.
    I am quite confused with "me vestí ya con el silbato" on this sentence, does it really means "I put on the whistle" ?? but how to understand it in this context?

    He was a football player until he became a trainer.

    One might think he is talking about the referee, my first thought, actually.

    But he is talking about being a player and the next day he directed the same team as a trainer he played with the day before .
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    One might think he is talking about the referee, my first thought, actually.
    That was my first thought as well. Regardless, I think it's saying that on Saturday, he was on the pitch as a player, and the very next day he returned with the same team, but this time as either a coach or a referee.

    ...al domingo por la mañana me vestí ya con el silbato con los mismos compañeros...
    ...on Sunday morning I put on the whistle with the same teammates...

    The author is using "put on the whistle" as a metaphor for changing roles from player to coach/referee. I'm still not clear, based on the context, which one is more likely. A coach will often use a whistle during practice, and the context doesn't specify whether Sunday's activity was a match or a practice.
     

    Magazine

    Senior Member
    Español-España.
    That was my first thought as well. Regardless, I think it's saying that on Saturday, he was on the pitch as a player, and the very next day he returned with the same team, but this time as either a coach
    Indeed, this was it.

    He was never a referee that I can think of, but he has been a trainer for a long time.
     

    tuzi

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    He was a football player until he became a trainer.

    One might think he is talking about the referee, my first thought, actually.

    But he is talking about being a player and the next day he directed the same team as a trainer he played with the day before .
    thanks a lot. what a metaphor, I actually didn't think of it.

    That was my first thought as well. Regardless, I think it's saying that on Saturday, he was on the pitch as a player, and the very next day he returned with the same team, but this time as either a coach or a referee.

    ...al domingo por la mañana me vestí ya con el silbato con los mismos compañeros...
    ...on Sunday morning I put on the whistle with the same teammates...

    The author is using "put on the whistle" as a metaphor for changing roles from player to coach/referee. I'm still not clear, based on the context, which one is more likely. A coach will often use a whistle during practice, and the context doesn't specify whether Sunday's activity was a match or a practice.
    thanks a lot. I could never connected the whistle with being a coach. That explains perfectly.
     
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