Veto/vetos

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Edgardg

Senior Member
Polish, Poland
Hi everyone,

is there any difference between the sentences?
- Veto is limited
- Vetos are limited
 
  • french4beth

    Senior Member
    US-English
    In the first example "veto" probably refers to the power to veto, so this is more general; in the second example, it means the specific actions of vetoing (vetos).
     

    NealMc

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Hi

    I guess this is one of those definition vs linguistic arguments. A veto should be an absolute, you either agree or oppose a motion - but in modern politics, democracy and bureaucracy there are degrees of veto and conditional vetos.

    If there are several votes (or ways to vote), there are several vetos.

    Cheers
    Neal Mc
     

    nelliot53

    Senior Member
    Spanish-[PR]; English-[US]
    is there any difference between the sentences?
    - Veto is limited
    - Vetos are limited

    Well, the first is in singular and the second is in plural.
    And I believe the plural of veto is vetoes.

    Please correct me if I'm mistaken.
     
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