videō barbam et pallium

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AH92

Banned
Hebrew - Israel
salvēte!

videō barbam et pallium; philosophum nōndum videō.
Je vois une barbe et un manteau ; je ne vois encore pas de philosophe.

Shouldn't the verb come at the end of the first sentence just as it did in the second?

Thanks!
 
  • Scholiast

    Senior Member
    saluete omnes!

    With respect, of course, to our friend from Italy, I think a point is being missed here: for educated Romans a beard (as Romans themselves were usually clean-shaven)* and a cloak—rather than a toga—emblematized a Greek philosopher, or a philosophical 'chaplain' who might be engaged by members of the Roman élite to give them lectures or solace and some claims to intellectual engagement. The quotation, whencesoever (it would be good to know) plays on this: 'He has the beard and the cloak, but I don't yet detect the philosopher in him'.

    Σ

    *Edited afterthought: 'upper-class Romans'.
     
    Last edited:

    bearded

    Senior Member
    As concerns the word order (''shouldn't the verb come at the end...''), I would say that
    - the word order in classical Latin was not as compulsory as AH92 seems to believe;
    - the reversal of word order, so called ''chiasmus'' (especially in mottoes and/or concise expressions) was a very common and efficacious feature.
     

    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    Greetings once more
    - the word order in classical Latin was not as compulsory as AH92 seems to believe;
    - the reversal of word order, so called ''chiasmus'' (especially in mottoes and/or concise expressions) was a very common and efficacious feature.
    bearded's first comment is quite right: for nuance or emphasis, Latin word-order is much more flexible, especially in poetry or high rhetoric, than some manuals of grammar seem to suggest.
    Secondly, yes, chiasmus is a frequent figure in proverbial or other epigrammatic phraseology; it may be of further interest that it takes its name from the Greek letter chi, which looks like a Latin 'X', and therefore means literally 'crossing over'.
    Σ
     
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