Voices of foxes

< Previous | Next >
Dear all,
I need your help to understand the words "voices of foxes" from the following sentence:

"As he looked at the pages it was as if he was listening to the voices of foxes in his mind but he did not say anything."

Is it something like 'cunning voices/advices'?
Thank you very much!

Greetings,
Magdalena
 
  • Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Although I might tend to agree with GWB, I think we need background and context. Please have a look at the guidance on providing these things.

    For example, what were the pages he was looking at? It is also usually of great help if you can tell us the name of the work the quotation is from.
     
    I'm sorry, I'm quite new here...

    I'm translating the novel "Last Train to Istanbul" by Ayse Kulin.

    The sentence is about the Turkish president who is reading a report about the World War II and the Nazis. He needs to decide what to do, how to trick all the Europeans and to keep Turkey out of the war.

    I suppose that he was listening to his cunning ideas in his head... Maybe...

    Thank you.
     

    Nymeria

    Senior Member
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    Could your provide the sentences before and after the one in question, please?
     
    Inönü [the president] was sitting in a club chair behind a huge table. He looked more naïve, smaller and more irritated than usual. He started leafing through the papers his private secretary had taken from Macit and placed in front of him. As he looked at the pages it was as if he was listening to the voices of foxes in his mind but he did not say anything. The men sitting around the table were silent too.
    He suddenly asked, “Have you listened to the radio today?”
     

    Wishfull

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hi.
    I think "fox"'s meaning here is No.4 of WR dictionary; dodger, fox, slyboots, a shifty deceptive person
    I think who had the cunning idea was not Inönü, but the people written in the papers, perhaps including Hitler himself.
    Because it was not "a voice of a fox" but "voices of foxes". Plural.
    As he looked at the pages, he realized how dodger they were, but he didn't say anything.



    What do you think?
     
    Last edited:

    shawnee

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    Magdalena without any knowledge of the book the possible interpretations are many and varied. I would highly recommend you post this question on the Turkish forum as there may be some cultural significance to the image of wolves (I'm sorry I meant foxes) and the time period.
     

    Nymeria

    Senior Member
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    Magdalena, my first thought is that 'voices of foxes' refers to 'voices of cunning people'. However it still sounds somewhat odd.

    I think shawnee has a point and I agree that there may be a specific reason why the writer chose to express it in that particular way that persons more familiar with the context may be able to grasp.
     
    Thank you all very much for your kind help.
    I guess now that the "Voices of foxes" are the voices of people who wrote this report Inonu was reading.
    I will also try to ask the Turks of their opinion.

    Thank you,
    Magdalena
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top