Vorgangspassiv vs. Zustandpassiv

< Previous | Next >

Linni

Senior Member
Czech Republic; Czech
Here's my other question about the German passive voice.

(I'm trying to compare German with English again.)

Longman: English Grammar (L. G. Alexander) - chapter 12.7:
Many words such as broken, interested, shut, worried can be used either as adjectives or as past participles in passive constructions. A difference can be noted between:
I was worried about you all night. (adjective: a state)
I was worried by mosquitoes all night. (passive: dynamic verb)
If the word is an adjective, it cannot be used with by + agent and cannot be transposed into a sentence in the active.
I wonder if this rule also applies to the Zustandpassiv and Vorgangspassiv in German. Can one say that the Zustandpassiv consists of the verb "sein" + an adjective (past participle)? I mean, do you consider the word "zubereitet" in the sentence "Das Gericht ist zubereitet." an adjective while in the sentence "Das Gericht wird zubereitet." a verb?
If so, does it mean that it is impossible to mention the doer in the Zustandpassiv (as well as in English)? For example, would it be correct if I said "Meine Mutter hat das Gericht zubereitet. => Das Gericht ist von meiner Mutter zubereitet."? Or would I have to change the Zustandpassiv into the Vorgangspassiv and say "Das Gericht wurde von meiner Mutter zubereitet."?
 
  • Hutschi

    Senior Member
    I was worried about you all night. (adjective: a state)
    Ich war die ganze Nacht um dich besorgt. (Zustand, aber kein Passiv, in Deutsch ist "besorgt" ein Partizip (Mittelwort), das heißt, es ist ein Verb, das hier wie ein Adjektiv verwendet wird.)
    (Wird der englische Satz wirklich als Passiv betrachtet?)


    I was worried by mosquitoes all night. (passive: dynamic verb)
    Ich wurde während der gesamten Nacht von Moskitos belästigt. Hier ist es ein Vorgangspassiv.

    If the word is an adjective, it cannot be used with by + agent and cannot be transposed into a sentence in the active.

    Das trifft in Deutsch so nicht zu, da der Satz im Aktiv steht und das entsprechende Wort ein Partizip ist:

    Ich bin um dich besorgt.

    "Ich bin besorgt" ist aktiv.

    Passiv wäre zum Beispiel:

    Die Sorge ist kaum zu ertragen.
    Ich werde veranlasst, besorgt zu sein.
    Ihm gehört das Handwerk gelegt. (Vorgangspassiv, umgangssprachlich.)

    Das Gericht ist von meiner Mutter zubereitet."? Or would I have to change the Zustandpassiv into the Vorgangspassiv and say "Das Gericht wurde von meiner Mutter zubereitet."?
    Normalerweise wird hier der Vorgangspassiv verwendet. Der Zustandspassiv ist korrekt, aber zumindest in der Gegend, in der ich wohne, wird er in diesem Fall sehr selten verwendet. Bitte beachten: Oft wird die Aktivform vorgezogen: "Den Kuchen hat meine Mutter gebacken." Bei "Das Gericht hat meine Mutter zubereitet" besteht der Nachteil, dass der Akkussativ von "Das Gericht" mit dem Nominativ übereinstimmt. Die Struktur des Satzes (Objekt, Verb, Subjekt) erschließt sich daher nur aus der Bedeutung.
     

    Suilan

    Senior Member
    Germany (NRW)
    OK, then let's try different examples, where the passive voice sounds natural.

    (Zustandspassiv)
    Das Essen ist serviert.
    Der Tisch ist gedeckt.

    (Vorgangspassiv)
    Das Essen wurde zu spät serviert.
    Der Tisch muss noch gedeckt werden.

    Whether Zustands- or Vorgangspassiv, "serviert" and "gedeckt" are called past participle (Zweites Partizip). In German, the obvious difference lies in the choice of sein or werden (which is why the Zustandspassiv is also called Sein-Passiv, and the Vorgangspassive Werden-Passiv).

    The past participle of the transitive verbs can always be used as adjectives, also those of some intransitive verbs with sein, i.e. of those that describe transitions from one state to another (perfektive Verben). Examples of this group: erblühen, verblühen, vollenden, verblassen. E.g.: die v/erblühte Rose, das vollendete Werk, der verblasste Stoff.

    The following past participles can't be used as adjectives.

    1) of intransitive verbs that take haben in the present perfect :)cross:das geschlafene Kind, :cross:der aufgehörte Regen)

    2) of intransitive verbs that take sein, unless they are "perfektiv" (s. above), so you can't have

    :cross:das gelaufene Kind, der gerannte Marathon.

    However, in German, an imperfect verb (such as laufen) can be made perfect by adding a prepositional phrase: Das Kind lief in den Wald.

    So you can have: das in den Wald gelaufene Kind.

    3) Reflexive verbs like: sich schämen, sich freuen, sich ärgern

    :cross: das (sich) geschämte Kind, die (sich) gefreute Verkäuferin, der (sich) geärgerte Lehrer

    The rules and some of the examples courtesy to Duden #4 Grammatik, 2001.

    Your worry example doesn't help to illustrate the differences between German and English because "worry" would be translated as two different words, sorgen and belästigen. Also, sorgen can't be used in the passive voice. One must use the adjective besorgt.

    Die Mutter sorgt sich.
    Die Mutter hat sich gesorgt.
    Die Mutter ist besorgt.
    :cross:Die Mutter ist/wurde gesorgt.

    Still, you can say that in German, your first example would require sein, the second werden.

    Ich bin besorgt
    :cross: Ich wurde besorgt.

    (I put the second sentence in past tense, because "Ich werde besorgt" is future tense, not passive voice.)

    Ich werde belästigt.
    ?? Ich bin belästigt. -- sounds a bit strange, though it's not ungrammatical.

    beschäftigen might be an example of what you were thinking of.

    Cf.

    1) Die Kinder sind beschäftigt. (Zustand)
    2) Die Kinder werden beschäftigt. (Vorgang)

    In both sentences, the children are playing.

    In the first sentence, it doesn't say whether they occupy themselves or are supervised or watch TV. It merely stresses the fact that they are occupied. Possible context: Ich muss mal kurz zur Nachbarin rüber, solange die Kinder beschäftigt sind.

    In the second sentence, someone is playing with the kids to occupy them, e.g.: Bei Ikea werden die Kinder beschäftigt, während die Eltern einkaufen gehen.

    So there's another difference between the two sentences, considering them from a semantical/pragmatical point of view: who is doing the action. In the first sentence, it's the kids, in the second, it's some unnamed supervisor-person.


    Isn't that the main difference in your worry-example too?

    beschäftigen seems to work just like your worry example in another respect: you can't use the "worried" in attributive (pre-noun adjective) position in the sense of "worried by mosquitoes," or "beschäftigt durch die Ikea-Angestellten"

    The worried mother -- the mother is worried.
    The worried sleeper -- the sleeper is worried.
    Die beschäftigten Kinder -- Die Kinder sind beschäftigt.

    In these phrases, it's mother/sleeper/Kinder who are doing the worrying or the occupying

    :cross: The worried sleeper -- The sleeper is worried by mosquitoes.
    :cross: Die beschäftigten Kinder -- Die Kinder werden beschäftigt.

    Instead, you need:

    The sleeper worried by mosquitoes...
    Die Kinder, die von Ikea-Angestellten beschäftigt werden, ...

    In these two sentences, it's the mosquitoes or Ikea-Angestellte who do the worrying and occupying.

    ? Die von Erziehern beschäftigten Kinder -- sounds very fishy to me. In this position, the preferred reading of beschäftigt seems to be "hired" -- Der von/bei Ikea beschäftigte Angestellte... (i.e. Zustand, not Vorgang!)

    Hope this helps.

    Cheers,
    Suilan
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi, Suilan, Ich habe ein paar Zusatzfragen:

    Ich bin besorgt. - is this construction passive? It is very different to:

    Das Essen wird besorgt. Das Essen ist besorgt. (Here it is clearly passive, but this is only used with the homonyme "besorgt".)

    I'm also not sure whether "Adjektiv" and "adjective" are false friends.

    Another question: Does "passive" mean exactily the same as "Passiv"?

    Hutschi
     

    Suilan

    Senior Member
    Germany (NRW)
    Hutschi said:
    Ich bin besorgt. - is this construction passive?
    Es ist überhaupt kein Passiv. "besorgt" ist ein Adjektiv. Der Passiv wird mit dem 2. Partizip gebildet. Das 2. Partizip von "sorgen" ist "gesorgt", aber ":cross:Ich bin gesorgt" ist falsch.

    > Das Essen wird besorgt. Das Essen ist besorgt.

    Hier handelt es sich um das Verb "besorgen," das nichts mit "Ich bin besorgt" zu tun hat.

    Das meinte ich mit "Also, sorgen can't be used in the passive (voice). One must use the adjective besorgt."

    Does "passive" mean exactily the same as "Passiv"?

    Man sagt "passive voice" im Englischen; ich vergesse das "voice" manchmal. (Ich habe es oben verbessert.)
     

    Acrolect

    Senior Member
    German, Austria
    What a thorough explanation, Suilan!
    (Just one question: sich entspannen - entspannt sein, is there an explanation why this works even though it is a reflexive verb. Or have I misunderstood the condition. I suspect it has something to do with the prefix and its semantic consequences.)

    Anyway, just one addition: there clearly is an affinity between participles and adjectives and some words, which originally were verbs, are developing into adjectives, as is the case with worried or (in German) überrascht (you can test that by combining these words with intensifiers such as very or trying to form a comparative: very worried, more worried, überraschter). But they still have a somewhat hybrid status syntactically.

    BTW, passive is the same as Passiv, the category of voice does not necessarily have to be mentioned. And adjective und Adjektiv mean the same thing. In both cases, this of course does not imply that there are no differerences between the features in English and German.
     

    ablativ

    Senior Member
    German(y)
    Anyway, just one addition: there clearly is an affinity between participles and adjectives and some words, which originally were verbs, are developing into adjectives, as is the case with worried or (in German) überrascht (you can test that by combining these words with intensifiers such as very or trying to form a comparative: very worried, more worried, überraschter). But they still have a somewhat hybrid status syntactically.


    He is more educated than I am. Is "educated" considered an adjective in this context? According to your rules, I suppose it is, but in that case there are very few verbs left that are not considered adjectives.

    She is very much adored by her boy-friend. (adored = verb because "much" has to be added ?) What about the comparative? She is adored a lot more by her boy-friend than by ... ?

    abl.
     

    Acrolect

    Senior Member
    German, Austria
    The comparative condition is a bit swampy, I admit.

    Anyway, much does not count as an intensifier for this purpose because it can also function as an adverb to modify verbs (I love him very much). The question is: can you say very adored, very appreciated, very liked, very detested? Probably they work less well than very educated, very surprised, very interested, which indicates that these participles are more adjectival than the former. The latter also coordinate more easily with normal adjectives (surprised but happy, educated and very intelligent versus ?detested but happy, adored but down-to-earth). This leaves you with plenty of participles not really adjectival following the copula.
     

    Suilan

    Senior Member
    Germany (NRW)
    Acrolect said:
    The comparative condition is a bit swampy, I admit.
    Es ist nur dann ein Passiv, wenn man den Satz in einen aktiven Satz umwandeln könnte.

    Duden #4 (2001) describes the following test to tell Zustandspassiv from similar but non-passive constructs. ($322)

    1) Zustandspassiv:

    -- Die Tür ist geöffnet.

    active sentence: Jemand öffnet die Tür.

    -- Das Buch ist mit Staub bedeckt.
    active sentence: Staub bedeckt das Buch.

    2) Prädikatives Adjektiv:

    -- Der Junge ist begabt.
    :cross:Jemand hat den Jungen begabt.

    "begabt" only looks somewhat like a participle.

    (prädikatives Adjektiv means adjective used with sein.)

    3) Zustandsreflexiv:

    -- Das Mädchen ist verliebt.
    :cross:Jemand hat das Mädchen verliebt.

    Duden says, "Was das Zustandsreflexiv angeht, so entbehrt es von vornherein des Passiv-Charakters, da es von einem nicht passivfähigem Verb abgeleitet ist.

    4) Perfekt aktiv:

    Der Junge ist verzogen.
    (if verzogen means spoilt, then this is Zustandspassiv: Er ist verzogen worden. Seine Eltern haben ihn verzogen.)

    Der Junge ist verzogen. (if it means umgezogen, then it's Perfekt aktiv.)
    :cross:Die Umzugsfirma hat den Jungen verzogen.

    Acrolect said:
    Anyway, just one addition: there clearly is an affinity between participles and adjectives and some words, which originally were verbs, are developing into adjectives.
    I'd say entspannt in "Ich bin entspannt" falls under this category (past participle turned adjective). It's not present perfect active, or a passive :)cross: Ich bin entspannt worden; Jemand hat mich entspannt. -- I wouldn't use it but it does get hits on the internet. Well, what doesn't.)

    So what about Zustandsreflexiv? It doesn't seem to me. Compare:

    a) Das verliebte Mädchen, das Mädchen ist verliebt --> das Mädchen hat sich verliebt.

    b) Die entspannte Atmosphäre, die Atmosphäre ist entspannt --:cross:--> Die Atmosphäre hat sich entspannt.

    "die Atmosphäre ist entspannt" doesn't mean that it ever was anything but entspannt, so there is no relation to "sich entspannen."

    So I think, entspannt is an adjective here that just happens to be derived from the past participle, just like besorgt.

    (Despite this difference between verliebt and entspannt, I'm not sure the distinction between 2 and 3 serves any practical purpose; both behave like adjectives. See below.)

    Another proof that entspannt, verliebt, besorgt, gereizt, übertrieben are adjectives: they can be used as adverbs (like most other adjectives): "Es wurde entspannt geplaudert. Man tuschelte verliebt. Alle warteten gespannt. Alle warteten besorgt auf Nachricht. Der gereizt reagierende Polizist. Er hat übertrieben reagiert." That's not something a past participle can do.

    (Examples with "real" adjectives in this position: "Er behandelte sich freundlich. Man hat sie warm empfangen.")

    In: "Die Lage hat sich entspannt," entspannt is still a past participle.)

    But in: "Das ist übertrieben," übertrieben is an adjective (I would argue) since the sentence doesn't mean --:cross:--> Jemand hat das übertrieben. or: Das ist übertrieben worden.

    I hope I have removed all clarity.
     

    Linni

    Senior Member
    Czech Republic; Czech
    Vielen Dank für alle eure Antworten. Ihr habt es wirklich gut erklärt (vor allem Suilan)!
    Ich will mich entschuldigen, weil es wirklich zu lange (ein "paar" Tage :eek:) gedauert hat, bis ich die alle Antworten gelesen habe.
    Aber endlich habe ich es alles gelesen und ich hoffe, dass ich es jetzt wohl verstehe.

    Ich habe nur ein paar Frage (ich konnte irgendwelche Sätze nicht ins Tschechischen übersetzen):

    Die Sorge ist kaum zu ertragen.

    Ihm gehört das Handwerk gelegt. (Vorgangspassiv, umgangssprachlich.)
    Hutschi, was bedeuten die Sätze auf Englisch, bitte?

    Wieso ist den zweiten Satz ein Vorgangspassiv? Im Satz gibt es doch kein "iwerden"...

    Und warum sagt man (im ersten Satz) nicht "wurde", sondern "ist"? Ich meine, warum man das Zustandpassiv (statt des Vorgangspassiv) im ersten Satz benutzt hat?

    (I put the second sentence in past tense, because "Ich werde besorgt" is future tense, not passive voice.)
    Wieso ist der Satz "Ich werde besorgt" Futur I ? Man müsste doch "Ich werde besorgt SEIN" sagen, oder? Oder äußert "besorgt werden" irgendeine (Ver)änderung wie z.B. "krank werden"?

    Was bedeutet es? (used in writing when you want the reader to make a comparison between the subject being discussed and something else ?)

    Duden says, "Was das Zustandsreflexiv angeht, so entbehrt es von vornherein des Passiv-Charakters, da es von einem nicht passivfähigem Verb abgeleitet ist.
    Könnte es bitte jemand noch ins Englischen übersetzen?
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Die Sorge ist kaum zu ertragen. - You have such a lot of sorrow, that you can't stand it. (literally: The sorrow is almost not (barely) to be stand (bearable). - But I think in English you cannot say this in this way.)

    Ihm gehört das Handwerk gelegt. (Vorgangspassiv, umgangssprachlich.)
    It is necessary to stop him continuing his crimes.
    Literally; Him is necessary to stop (to be laid down) the business/handwork. (Business/handwork) in the sense of crime.)
     

    Suilan

    Senior Member
    Germany (NRW)
    Autokorrektur (Post 9, ziemlich weit unten):

    Suilan said:
    :cross:Er behandelte sich freundlich
    Tippfehler. Muss: Er behandelte sie freundlich heißen.

    cf. ist die übliche Abkürzung im Englischen für compare (irgendwas Lateinisches.)

    > Ich werde besorgt.

    Ah. Hilfe. Nicht Futur. Präsens. Du hast recht, Linni. Ich hatte nur sagen wollen, dass das werde in dem Satz nicht nach dem Passiv werden klingt, sondern nach dem werden, mit dem der Futur gebildet wird. (Ohne zugehörigen Infinitiv ist es aber einfach Präsens.)

    Bier wird besorgt. --> Hier kommt besorgt von besorgen = einkaufen. Beer will be bought/provided.

    Ich werde besorgt. --> Hier ist besorgt ein Adjektiv = worried. I'm becoming worried.
     

    Linni

    Senior Member
    Czech Republic; Czech
    Danke :)


    cf. ist die übliche Abkürzung im Englischen für compare (irgendwas Lateinisches.)
    Ach so... ich habe es schon festgestellt - es ist eine Abkürzung des lateinischen Wort "confer", welches "Vergleich" bedeutet. (Ich hoffe, dass ich es gut geschrieben habe, weil ich Lateinisch nicht spreche.)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top