vote to/on/for the bill

Himanshu Sindhi

Senior Member
Hindi
This question was asked in an exam in India as...

In the following questions, some parts of the sentences have errors and some are correct. Find out which part of a sentence has an error. The number of that part is the answer. If a sentence is free from error, your answer is (4) i.e. No error.

The Parliament took a historic (1)/ decision to back the will of (2)/ the people and vote to the bill (3)/ No Error (4)

As per the official answer key, the error is in "part 3". Would it be "vote on the bill"? Because we "vote for (a person)", "vote to (power)" and "vote on (resolution)".
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    What would you mean by that? A general election is called by the person or party in power. There isn’t a public vote for or against holding a general election in the first place – which is what that sentence implies.
     

    nh01

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    I don't want to express "for" or "against" but I want to mean the act of voting in general. So should I say "They will vote in general elections today."? Thanks in advance.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Not that there’s no need, but that it makes no sense – it would be wrong (unless you were talking about two or more countries having general elections on the same day).
     

    nh01

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Not that there’s no need, but that it makes no sense – it would be wrong (unless you were talking about two or more countries having general elections on the same day).
    Thanks for this helpful point.
    One more question about "vote for/in" matter. Is "for" certainly necessary in these sentences below? And would using "to" instead of "for" certainly be wrong?

    Which party will you vote for in the general election?
    For which party will you vote in the general election?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes. The verb vote is intransitive in the sense of casting your vote. You vote for a candidate. But if they win, they are said to have been “voted in”.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There’s no need to add “in” to that example. It would not be wrong, but it’s much less idiomatic.

    Winning in an election is not the same as being “voted in”, which is a set phrase connected with being voted into a position.
     

    nh01

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Yes. The verb vote is intransitive in the sense of casting your vote.
    So is it possible to ask these questions interchangeably? Thanks.

    "For which party will you cast a vote in the general election?"
    "Which party will you vote for in the general election?"
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "For which party will you cast your vote in the general election?" :tick::thumbsdown:

    "Which party will you vote for in the general election?" :tick::thumbsup::thumbsup:
     
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