Vowel pronunciation in the word homem

kamoo

New Member
English -American
ok so I know there are at least two ways to pronounce "o" there is Ô and Ó

which one is in homem? In other words,does the "o" in this word rhyme with "home" or "saw"?

Thank you in advance!
 
  • Ariel Knightly

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    ok so I know there are at least two ways to pronounce "o" there is Ô and Ó

    which one is in homem? In other words,does the "o" in this word rhyme with "home" or "saw"?

    Thank you in advance!
    The o in home is a diphthong: [hõʊ̯̃m]. The o in homem doesn't have this [ʊ] sound: [ˈõmẽɪ̯̃]. The thing is, when [o] is nasalized, it sounds as if it were a little bit lower, then many people might mistake this [õ] for an [ɔ]. But when these sounds are not nasalized - as in otário and ótimo, for example -, the contrast between them is quite obvious for everyone.

    -----[EDIT]------

    [o]: o in otário
    [ɔ]: o in ótimo and aw in saw
    [oʊ̯]: o in go and ou in outro
    [õ]: o in homem
    [õʊ̯̃]: o in home
    [ɔ̃]: I don't think it exists in standard Brazilian Portuguese
     
    Last edited:

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Please notice that the real ''phonetic'' values are subject to regional variations, even tho' the phonologic distinction of ó ~ ô is kept within the dialect/accent:

    In Rio, more often than not, the ô ~ ó is realized as the [o(ɐ)] ~ [(w)ɔ]: o gosto [o] , eu gosto [(w)ɔ], gostosa [wɔ], alô [a'lo(ɐ)]

    In Salvador, on the other hand, ô ~ ó is realized as the [o] ~ [], our open o is much higher, and it's never diphthongized.
    That's why gostosa, avó as pronounced by cariocas may sound like gostuósa, avóa to a baiano ear, and olha só when pronounced as baianos may sound like ôlha sô to a carioca person (if s/he
    can stop thinking about the meaning of the words and tries to listen to the actual values).

    So, in Salvador:
    ó stands for Mid back rounded vowel
    ô stands for Close-mid back rounded vowel (it may be even higher, halfway between ô and ú).
    The relative distance is closer than in Carioca Portuguese :)

    As for the word homem,
    in my variety it's definitely pronounced as it were written hõmem, with a strong nasal(ized) õ (and with a full consonant m that follows it), the final
    -em is normally pronounced as a nasal diphthong but may be pronounced as a nasal e in fast speech, or as a completely denasalized vowel i in popular speech: hõmi)

    Not nasal hômem is what makes me think of Southern Brazilian Portuguese (well at least, from Vitória Southwards).
    Hómem with an open vowel (that can be oral/non-nasal or nasal), is typical of São Paulo. I believe hómem is the way people pronounce it in Portugal, but I'm not 100% sure.
     
    Last edited:

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Short answer to the question: it depends if you're in Portugal ('saw') or Brazil (not-quite 'home').
    Let's not use the English vowel system because there are inumerous English and American accents. :)
    For example, M.Webster's learner's dictionary gives us these pronunciations:

    SAW /ˈsɑ:/
    Não existe a vogal ɑ em português.

    HOME /ˈhoʊm/
    oʊ seria ol em voltar

    American English pronunciation of or, war is close to our Baiano open ó: which is more often than not a Mid back rounded vowel.
    It's difficult to compare between different languages,
    the idea of IPA transcription is: to describe relative relations between various sounds of ONE single variety.
    Even when we try to compare various accents/dialects we have problems, so IPA is not normally used for comparing various sounds from various languages,
    a more thorough phonetic analysis is needed.
     
    Last edited:

    Ariel Knightly

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    HOME /ˈhoʊm/
    oʊ seria ol em voltar
    The diphthong in home is actually nasalized: [hõʊ̯̃m].

    Istriano said:
    Hómem with an open vowel (that can be oral/non-nasal or nasal), is typical of São Paulo.
    Are you sure about that, Istriano? I thought all stressed vowels were necessarily nasalized when immediately followed by a nasal consonant in Portuguese.

    Istriano said:
    SAW /ˈsɑ:/
    Não existe a vogal ɑ em português.
    Okay, but the pronunciation of saw meant by Kamoo must have been the one found in the Merriam-Webster's Dictionary: [sɔ].

    Istriano said:
    It's difficult to compare between different languages,
    the idea of IPA transcription is: to describe relative relations between various sounds of ONE single variety.
    Even when we try to compare various accents/dialects we have problems, so IPA is not normally used for comparing various sounds from various languages,
    a more thorough phonetic analysis is needed.
    You're right. But even though it may be true that our [ɔ] is normally a little bit lower than the [ɔ] they usually pronounce in English, I think you can often didacticly disregard this kind of difference, especially when it is not phonologically important.
     

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Well, in São Paulo you can hear pronunciations like nóme, hómem, António, quilómetro, eu cómo. :)
    Not everyone speaks like that in the city of SP but many do.

    Pensando bem, those of Italian origins are the most likely to speak like that.
    Those who came from the interior, may have the open vowel which is nasalized.
    Many people have close vowel which is not nasalized [nôme, hômem], this would be a non-Italian paulistano accent and
    only some have the nasal forms [nõme, hõmem, quilõmetro], most of them immigrants from the Northeast. :)
     
    Last edited:

    kamoo

    New Member
    English -American
    Thanks all !
    whoa I’m sorry I should not have used American examples, I just caused myself  and everyone to get confused because it’s not really accurate
     
    I’m just trying to figure out whether the “o” is “closed(rounded I guess?) or open?
     
    thanks for the note on Portugal, I know I’ve heard it (homem) said both ways unless I’m taking crazy pills.
     

    Ariel Knightly

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Como diferenciais "Avô" de "Avó", peço-me isso desde muitos tempos ?
    I guess the French often have a hard time differentiating "ô" from "ó". It's funny because you have both sounds in French too. The close-mid back rounded [o] is that sound you have in idiot: [idjo]. The open-mid back rounded [ɔ] is the sound you have in idiote: [idjɔt].

    avô > [a'vo]
    avó > [a'vɔ]

    -----[EDIT]------

    If you're still unsure about how to pronounce [o] and [ɔ], you can listen tho these sounds here and here.
     
    Last edited:

    Ariel Knightly

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Kamoo said:
    I’m just trying to figure out whether the “o” is “closed(rounded I guess?) or open?
    Both "closed" and open vowels can be rounded - and also nasalized, by the way. The sound [o] is a close-mid back rounded vowel and [ɔ] is an open-mid back rounded vowel. See? They're both rounded. They're different just because [o] is not as open as [ɔ]. In homem, [o] gets nasalized because of the the nasal [m]. Then you have [õ], which is kind of similar to the o in home.
     

    Macunaíma

    Senior Member
    português, Brasil
    I have been in this forum for some time now and hearing that a sound is round still makes as much sense to me as hearing that it is S-shaped, heart-shaped, star-shaped or, for that matter, that it is yellow with purple polka dots on it. I strongly recommend you go the link I posted above and actually HEAR the word.
     
    Last edited:

    Ariel Knightly

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    I have been in this forum for some time now and hearing that a sound is round still makes as much sense to me as hearing that it is S-shaped, heart-shaped, star-shaped or, for that matter, that it is yellow with purple polka dots on it. I strongly recomment you go the link I posted above and actually HEAR the word.
    When you say a vowel is rounded, it means your lips are rounded when you pronounce it. That's the difference between dog [dɔg] and dug [dʌg]. The latter is an unrounded version of the former.
     

    Macunaíma

    Senior Member
    português, Brasil
    When you say a vowel is rounded, it means your lips are rounded when you pronounce it. That's the difference between dog [dɔg] and dug [dʌg]. The latter is an unrounded version of [ɔ].
    Nem se o Wando pronunciasse essas palavras mil vezes diante de meus olhos incrédulos eu seria capaz de divisar uma diferença na forma dos lábios ao pronunciar dog e dug. Eu juro que tentei no espelho aqui agora e nada, nenhuma diferença perceptível ao olho nu foi produzida! Eu entendo que esses termos são uma analogia assim, como dizer?, "sinestésica", como quando um enochato diz que um vinho é "aveludado", "crocante", "untuoso", "dança Rebolation na boca", etc., mas, de qualquer forma, é difícil demais para os não especializados. Enfim, assunto para outro tópico.
     

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Em inglês americano da Costa Oeste (o californiano praticamente virou a norma culta, graças a Hollywood):

    dog [dɑ:g] (é mais ou menos como o a inicial em asa*)
    dug [dɐg] (é mais ou menos como o a final em asa*)

    fonte: Ladefoged, Peter (1999), "American English", Handbook of the International Phonetic Association, Cambridge University Press, pp. 41–44

    ---
    (*grifo meu)
     
    Last edited:

    Ariel Knightly

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Em inglês americano da Costa Oeste (o californiano praticamente virou a norma culta, graças a Hollywood):

    dog [dɑ:g] (é mais ou menos como o a inicial em asa*)
    dug [dɐg] (é mais ou menos como o a final em asa*)

    fonte: Ladefoged, Peter (1999), "American English", Handbook of the International Phonetic Association, Cambridge University Press, pp. 41–44

    ---
    (*grifo meu)
    Por obviamente haver variantes, fiz questão de usar transcrições para deixar claro de que sons eu estava falando...

    Istriano said:
    This carioca woman has an o vowel in homem halfway between [o] and [ɔ]
    I heard [õ]...

    Macunaíma said:
    Nem se o Wando pronunciasse essas palavras mil vezes diante de meus olhos incrédulos eu seria capaz de divisar uma diferença na forma dos lábios ao pronunciar dog e dug. Eu juro que tentei no espelho aqui agora e nada, nenhuma diferença perceptível ao olho nu foi produzida! Eu entendo que esses termos são uma analogia assim, como dizer?, "sinestésica", como quando um enochato diz que um vinho é "aveludado", "crocante", "untuoso", "dança Rebolation na boca", etc., mas, de qualquer forma, é difícil demais para os não especializados. Enfim, assunto para outro tópico.
    Acho que podemos falar disso aqui; afinal, o que parece estar em questão desde o começo é a diferença entre [o] e [ɔ]. E se para entender a articualção desses sons for necessário compreender o que é uma vogal arredondada, por que não discutir isso aqui?

    Não entendo muito de enologia, mas acho importante explicar que a natureza da nomenclatura fonética não tem nada de esotérica; tem a ver com como nós articulamos os sons, e não exatamente como nós percebemos os mesmos. Quando chamamos o [o] de vogal posterior média fechada arredondada, estamos especificando a forma de articulação (é uma vogal, então o ar passa sem obstrução), a posição horizontal (posterior) e vertical (média fechada) da língua e o arredondamento dos lábios.

    Se você olhar novamente no espelho - e dessa vez sem má vontade -, perceberá ao pronunciar o [ɔ] que seus lábios ficam ligeiramente arredondados, o que você também poderá sentir pela musculatura da boca. Acho que todo mundo já ouviu que para falar francês você tem que fazer biquinho, certo? Nas aulas de francês para brasileiros, quando os professores ensinam a palavra tu, por exemplo, explicam que se deve pronunciá-la como ti só que fazendo biquinho - ou seja, arredondando os lábios. Isso vem do fato de ambas as vogais serem anteriores fechadas e terem como única diferença o arredondamento dos lábios.
     
    Last edited:

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Acontece que a pronúncia das vogais varia muito, em português, dependendo do sotaque.
    No Nordeste, há vogais nasais (puras), como em francês.
    No Sudeste, há apenas vogais nasalizadas, ou seja:
    conto
    ['kõtu] em Salvador, ['kõntu] em S. Paulo,
    bom ['bõ] em Salvador, [bõwŋ] em S. Paulo,
    por isso eles dizem que a gente pronuncia São Paulo como Sum Paulo, e a gente diz que eles pronunciam bom como boum ou bão. :D

    As conclusões como ''em português brasileiro não há vogais nasais'' são frequentes porque os linguistas não sabem olhar além do seu quintal.
    (A maioria das publicações foi baseada nos sotaques do interior paulista e do Sul).
    Então, não podemos generalizar. Cada artigo tem uma limitação: em português de Campinas é assim, em português de Salvador é assim...

    Espero que um dia vamos ter um Atlas fonológico/fonético do português brasileiro.
    Existe um atlas do inglês norteamericano que é muito bom: http://books.google.com/books/about/The_atlas_of_North_American_English.html?id=qa4-dFqi6iMC
     
    Last edited:

    SãoEnrique

    Banned
    French France
    I guess the French often have a hard time differentiating "ô" from "ó". It's funny because you have both sounds in French too. The close-mid back rounded [o] is that sound you have in idiot: [idjo]. The open-mid back rounded [ɔ] is the sound you have in idiote: [idjɔt].

    avô > [a'vo]
    avó > [a'vɔ]

    -----[EDIT]------

    If you're still unsure about how to pronounce [o] and [ɔ], you can listen tho these sounds here and here.
    Olá,

    Para responder a sua mensagem é verdade que em Francês temos também uma pronúncia mais ou menos díficil, isso depende das regiões também. Mas temos uma letra como vocês em Português que é similar é o "ô". Usamos-o nessas palavras: "tôt", "plutôt", "bientôt" mas não diferenciamos muito esse som "ô", do som normal "o" .
     

    Ariel Knightly

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Olá,

    Para responder a sua mensagem é verdade que em Francês temos também uma pronúncia mais ou menos díficil, isso depende das regiões também. Mas temos uma letra como vocês em Português que é similar é o "ô". Usamos-o nessas palavras: "tôt", "plutôt", "bientôt" mas não diferenciamos muito esse som "ô", do som normal "o" .
    Sim, eu entendo o motivo da dificuldade. Diferente do português, em francês esses fones normalmente não se opõem fonologicamente; ou seja, trocar um pelo outro em geral não mudaria em nada o sentido do que está sendo dito. Se eu não estiver enganado, acho que, por razões semelhantes, vocês também têm bastante dificuldade para diferenciar "ê" [e] de "é" [ɛ], não é verdade?
    Istriano said:
    Acontece que a pronúncia das vogais varia muito, em português, dependendo do sotaque.
    No Nordeste, há vogais nasais (puras), como em francês.
    No Sudeste, há apenas vogais nasalizadas, ou seja:
    conto
    ['kõtu] em Salvador, ['kõntu] em S. Paulo,
    bom ['bõ] em Salvador, [bõwŋ] em S. Paulo,
    por isso eles dizem que a gente pronuncia São Paulo como Sum Paulo, e a gente diz que eles pronunciam bom como boum ou bão. :D

    As conclusões como ''em português brasileiro não há vogais nasais'' são frequentes porque os linguistas não sabem olhar além do seu quintal.
    (A maioria das publicações foi baseada nos sotaques do interior paulista e do Sul).
    Então, não podemos generalizar. Cada artigo tem uma limitação: em português de Campinas é assim, em português de Salvador é assim...

    Espero que um dia vamos ter um Atlas fonológico/fonético do português brasileiro.
    Existe um atlas do inglês norteamericano que é muito bom: http://books.google.com/books/about/...d=qa4-dFqi6iMC
    Acho que o que você está chamando de "vogais nasais puras" e "vogais nasalizadas" tem a ver com uma discussão complicada a respeito da natureza das vogais nasais em português. De fato, alguns defendem que "em português brasileiro não há vogais nasais"; mas ao contrário do que você concluiu, isso não vem do fato de os lingüistas não saberem olhar para além do seu quintal. O que está em questão, na verdade, são duas interpretações sobre o que exatamente determinaria a oposição entre vogais nasais e não-nasais.

    Por um lado, há quem defenda uma interpretação fonêmica das vogais nasais; ou seja, elas seriam fonemas distintos das correspondentes não-nasais. Assim, além das vogais orais, nosso quadro vocálico contaria também com mais cinco nasais. Por outro lado, muitos preferem entender a vogal nasal como um grupo de dois fonemas: uma vogal mais o arquifonema consonântico /N/. Pela primeira hipótese, a consoante nasal - que pode ou não ocorrer - estaria condicionada à vogal nasal e seria apenas o resultado de uma transição do som nasal para a consoante seguinte. Já pela segunda hipótese, a nasalidade da vogal é que resulta de uma ressonância causada pela consoante nasal. Aqui, o arquifonema /N/ travaria a sílaba e poderia apresentar realizações concretas diversas, como [n], [m] e zero, por exemplo.

    Cada corrente tem os seus argumentos para defender o seu ponto de vista. Mas como aqui talvez não seja o lugar para levar adiante essa discussão, se você tiver interesse, o livro Iniciação à fonética e à fonologia, da Dinah Callou, tem um capítulo sobre esse assunto.

    Quanto ao atlas do Labov, seria mesmo ótimo se existisse algo semelhante em português. Seria ótimo também se não fosse tão absurdamente caro... :D
    Macunaíma said:
    I strongly recommend you go the link I posted above and actually HEAR the word.
    Macunaíma, como você deve saber, é muito comum uma pessoa já ter ouvido uma palavra estrangeira inúmeras vezes e ainda assim ser incapaz de pronunciá-la. Às vezes, ajudar uma pessoa a entender como articular uma palavra pode ser tão importante quanto aconselhá-la a ouvir novamente uma gravação.

    Quando eu estava começando a aprender francês, por exemplo, palavras como emprunter e empreinter eram o meu pesadelo. Por mais que eu ouvisse as gravações disponíveis, nunca consegui chegar a uma conclusão até ser capaz de pesquisar a articulação desses sons.
     
    Last edited:

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    A fonética (e a fonologia) de nossa língua é bastante complexa, mas muito robusta e consistente.
    Temos poucos casos de divergência de vogais tônicas: quilómetro ~ quilômetro, esófago ~ esôfago, senhôra ~ senhóra, bôina ~ bóina, colmêia ~ colméia...

    Na Itália, cada cidade tem suas próprias regras, por isso, globalmente falando, muitos dizem que o italiano (fora da Toscana e de Roma) neutralizou as vogais fechadas e as abertas
    (por exemplo: pésca (com a vogal aberta) é pêssego em Florença e Roma, mas pesca em Milão; pêsca (com a vogal fechada) é pesca em Florença e Roma, e pêssego em Milão,
    em Turim as duas coisas (tanto pêssego como pesca) são pésca (com a vogal aberta), em Veneza as duas são pêsca (com a vogal fechada), muita variedade criou uma bagunça total :D)
    Mas na verdade, a maioria dos sotaques de italiano têm 7 vogais tônicas, só que em cada cidade usam timbre diferente em palavras diferentes (primavéra em Roma, em Turim e em Florença, primavêra em Perugia e em Milão, témpo em Roma, Florença, Gênova, Turim, têmpo em Milão e em Veneza, ventitrê em Roma e em Florença, ventitré em Milão, stêlla em Roma e em Florença, stélla em Turim e em Milão :) ).

    Infelizmente, o caso francês está cada vez mais próximo ao italiano, ou seja, a pronúncia padrão você acha nos dicionários, mas poucas pessoas seguem.
    O francês de Paris agora tem suas regras particulares (semelhantes à fonética do italiano de Milão): o timbre da vogal depende da posição dessa vogal dentro de uma sílaba (è é se pronunciam fechado em sílabas abertas,
    e aberto em sílabas fechadas), e não da transcrição fonética que está nos dicionários (que apresenta a pronúncia de Paris do começo do século XIX :p ). E das vogais nasais nem se fala, houve
    uma reorganização fonética total.
     
    Last edited:

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    ok so I know there are at least two ways to pronounce "o" there is Ô and Ó

    which one is in homem? In other words,does the "o" in this word rhyme with "home" or "saw"?
    In Portugal, the general pronunciation seems to be with "ó". In popular speech you also find the variant "home", mostly pronounced with "ó", but in a few regions with "ô".

    Para responder a sua mensagem é verdade que em Francês temos também uma pronúncia mais ou menos díficil, isso depende das regiões também. Mas temos uma letra como vocês em Português que é similar é o "ô". Usamos-o nessas palavras: "tôt", "plutôt", "bientôt" mas não diferenciamos muito esse som "ô", do som normal "o" .
    A diferença entre "ô" e "ó" é como a diferença entre "é" e "è" em francês. O nosso "ó" é como o "o" de "notre", e o nosso "ô" como o de "le nôtre". Claro que em francês esta oposição tem muito menos importância do ponto de vista fonológico, e pode desaparecer em certas falas regionais.
     
    Last edited:

    Audie

    Senior Member
    Brazil Portuguese

    SãoEnrique

    Banned
    French France
    A fonética (e a fonologia) de nossa língua é bastante complexa, mas muito robusta e consistente.
    Temos poucos casos de divergência de vogais tônicas: quilómetro ~ quilômetro, esófago ~ esôfago, senhôra ~ senhóra, bôina ~ bóina, colmêia ~ colméia...

    Na Itália, cada cidade tem suas próprias regras, por isso, globalmente falando, muitos dizem que o italiano (fora da Toscana e de Roma) neutralizou as vogais fechadas e as abertas
    (por exemplo: pésca (com a vogal aberta) é pêssego em Florença e Roma, mas pesca em Milão; pêsca (com a vogal fechada) é pesca em Florença e Roma, e pêssego em Milão,
    em Turim as duas coisas (tanto pêssego como pesca) são pésca (com a vogal aberta), em Veneza as duas são pêsca (com a vogal fechada), muita variedade criou uma bagunça total :D)
    Mas na verdade, a maioria dos sotaques de italiano têm 7 vogais tônicas, só que em cada cidade usam timbre diferente em palavras diferentes (primavéra em Roma, em Turim e em Florença, primavêra em Perugia e em Milão, témpo em Roma, Florença, Gênova, Turim, têmpo em Milão e em Veneza, ventitrê em Roma e em Florença, ventitré em Milão, stêlla em Roma e em Florença, stélla em Turim e em Milão :) ).

    Infelizmente, o caso francês está cada vez mais próximo ao italiano, ou seja, a pronúncia padrão você acha nos dicionários, mas poucas pessoas seguem.
    O francês de Paris agora tem suas regras particulares (semelhantes à fonética do italiano de Milão): o timbre da vogal depende da posição dessa vogal dentro de uma sílaba (è é se pronunciam fechado em sílabas abertas,
    e aberto em sílabas fechadas), e não da transcrição fonética que está nos dicionários (que apresenta a pronúncia de Paris do começo do século XIX :p ). E das vogais nasais nem se fala, houve
    uma reorganização fonética total.
    Na fala de Paris há muitas palavras que não se pronunciam como no sul. No Sul eles falam com uma entonação aguda. Por exemplo no Sul nas grandes cidades as pessoas têm uma pronúncia da palavra "oeil" diferente que no Norte porque a letra "o" e "e" estão coladas. A palavra "oeil" no Norte, muito mais precisamente esse som "oe" é pronunciado como o "oua" Francês. Enquanto no Sul pronunciamos o som "oe" como o "un" Francês podemos ver que a leta"o" é pronunciada diferamente nas regiões.
     

    SãoEnrique

    Banned
    French France
    In Portugal, the general pronunciation seems to be with "ó". In popular speech you also find the variant "home", mostly pronounced with "ó", but in a few regions with "ô".

    A diferença entre "ô" e "ó" é como a diferença entre "é" e "è" em francês. O nosso "ó" é como o "o" de "notre", e o nosso "ô" como o de "le nôtre". Claro que em francês esta oposição tem muito menos importância do ponto de vista fonológico, e pode desaparecer em certas falas regionais.
    Claro que não temos importântia fonológicos/as como você disse pelo som "ô" em Francês exceto se falamos como a Paris onde o som "ô" é quase igual a vosso "au" prefiro escrever "aw" para marcar a pronúncia. Para mim essa pronúncia hoje é desaparecida e não tem importântia como você disse.
     

    Macunaíma

    Senior Member
    português, Brasil
    Claro que não temos importântia fonológicos/as como você disse pelo som "ô" em Francês exceto se falamos como a Paris onde o som "ô" é quase igual a vosso "au" prefiro escrever "aw" para marcar a pronúncia. Para mim essa pronúncia hoje é desaparecida e não tem importântia como você disse.
    E, por falar nisso, existe a diferença entre emprunter e empreinter que o Ariel citou logo acima? Eu não conhecia o verbo empreinter, mas o un de emprunt bancaire me sempre me pareceu idêntico ao in de vin.
     

    Ariel Knightly

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Se este [õ] quer dizer o nosso 'o' nasal ('õ'), definitivamente, não sei o que dizer dos meus ouvidos. Só consigo ouvir a carioca dizer 'ómein'. Sei lá, talvez Wando possa ajudar. Mas acho que a essa altura kamoo já desistiu.
    Estou começando a desconfiar que algumas pessoas aqui no fórum talvez confundam um pouco as vogais [ɔ] e [õ]. Acho que essa suposta confusão tem muito a ver com o fato de muita gente não entender que a notação fonética está ligada à articulação dos sons, e não à percepção deles. Do ponto de vista da percepção, [o] e [õ] parecem ser vogais bem diferentes; é como se a nasal fosse algo muito parecido com um [ɔ]. Mas do ponto de vista articulatório, com exceção do abaixamento do véu palatino, [õ] se articula exatamente da mesma maneira que [o].

    Na gravação de homem feita pela carioca, a vogal média [o] se torna nasal porque está acentuada antes de consoante nasal. E embora nós percebamos o resultado disso, que é [õ], como sendo muito parecido com um [ɔ], se fizermos uma forcinha, notaremos que a nasalidade da vogal deixa clara a sua origem articulatória. Isso porque se a vogal fosse mesmo [ɔ] - como alguns estão dizendo -, a nasalidade da consoante ressoanaria na vogal, que é acentuada. E se vocês articularem direitinho um [ɔ̃], vai ficar claro que isso não tem nada a ver com o que mulher pronunciou.

    Resumindo:

    . Ela não disse [ɔ̃], porque isso é bem diferente do que ela pronunciou.
    . Ela não pronunciou [ɔ], porque a vogal torna-se nasal quando acentuada antes de consoante nasal.
    . Ela disse [õ], embora esse som lembre o articulado pela vogal média aberta.
     
    Last edited:

    Audie

    Senior Member
    Brazil Portuguese
    Estou começando a desconfiar que algumas pessoas aqui no fórum talvez confundam um pouco as vogais [ɔ] e [õ]. Acho que essa suposta confusão tem muito a ver com o fato de muita gente não entender que a notação fonética está ligada à articulação dos sons, e não à percepção deles.
    Com relação a minha pessoa, não só comece, mas desconfie até o fim, hõmein :eek:. Preciso, em todo caso, melhorar a percepção da articulação para entender a notação. :eek:
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    E, por falar nisso, existe a diferença entre emprunter e empreinter que o Ariel citou logo acima? Eu não conhecia o verbo empreinter, mas o un de emprunt bancaire me sempre me pareceu idêntico ao in de vin.
    Oficialmente, -in (com -ain, -ein) e -un representam dois fonemas distintos, mas hoje em dia pronunciam-se da mesma forma em muitas variedades do francês.
     

    kamoo

    New Member
    English -American
    Both "closed" and open vowels can be rounded - and also nasalized, by the way. The sound [o] is a close-mid back rounded vowel and [ɔ] is an open-mid back rounded vowel. See? They're both rounded. They're different just because [o] is not as open as [ɔ]. In homem, [o] gets nasalized because of the the nasal [m]. Then you have [õ], which is kind of similar to the o in home.
    Thank you this is very helpful.
     

    SãoEnrique

    Banned
    French France
    Oficialmente, -in (com -ain, -ein) e -un representam dois fonemas distintos, mas hoje em dia pronunciam-se da mesma forma em muitas variedades do francês.
    Esse "ein" pode ser pronunciado mais tonicamente sobretudo no sul. Chamamos isto da pronúncia "occitane" da "lenga d'oc" (eu disse bém a pronúncia). O que faz que hoje não fazemos diferença de pronúncia.
     

    SãoEnrique

    Banned
    French France
    E, por falar nisso, existe a diferença entre emprunter e empreinter que o Ariel citou logo acima? Eu não conhecia o verbo empreinter, mas o un de emprunt bancaire me sempre me pareceu idêntico ao in de vin.
    Bom dia,

    Emprunter significa bém fazer "un emprunt" ou "se faire prêter pour un usage".

    Aqui um link: http://www.linternaute.com/dictionnaire/fr/definition/emprunt/

    Agora pela significação de "Empreinter": Não é um verdadeiro verbo é mais um "adjectif" mais depende do contexto.

    "Trace en creux ou en relief obtenue par la pression d'un corps sur une surface
    au sens figuré marque profonde et durable (l'empreinte d'un milieu social)"

    Expressões:

    "Empreinte digitale, trace laissée par les sillons de la peau sur un support. Ces sillons eux-mêmes
    empreinte biologique séquence d'ADN propre à chaque individu et qui permet une identification."

    Espero ter ajudado.
     

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Aqui podem testar o seu ouvido:


    http://phonetique.free.fr/phonvoy/nasales/nasales2a.htm

    Eu consegui 8/10.
    Eu não falo francês, e essa prova foi completamente acústica (fonética) no meu caso, e não semântica (fonológica).

    Quando os franceses pronunciam un, me parece que dizem ã (não ã de maçã, mas a de há nasal)
    quando pronunciam lentement, eu ouço algo como lõt'mõ (com ó nasal).

    http://www.forvo.com/word/un_bon_vin_blanc/
    un bon vin blanc

    ã bõ1 vã blõ2

    un e vin, na minha percepção, têm á (de há, dá) nasal,
    e não é (de fé, pé, acarajé) nasal.

    ---
    1 com ô de avô nasal
    2 com ó de avó nasal
     
    Last edited:

    Alandria

    Senior Member
    Português
    Acontece que a pronúncia das vogais varia muito, em português, dependendo do sotaque.
    No Nordeste, há vogais nasais (puras), como em francês.
    No Sudeste, há apenas vogais nasalizadas, ou seja:
    conto
    ['kõtu] em Salvador, ['kõntu] em S. Paulo,
    bom ['bõ] em Salvador, [bõwŋ] em S. Paulo,
    Até que enfim alguém neste mundo notou o que eu venho dizendo no Word Reference desde 2006!
    Essa velar nasal em posição final é típica de São Paulo capital e alguns estados do Sul.
     

    Ariel Knightly

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Até que enfim alguém neste mundo notou o que eu venho dizendo no Word Reference desde 2006!
    Essa velar nasal em posição final é típica de São Paulo capital e alguns estados do Sul.
    Típica de São Paulo capital e alguns estados do sul? Vocês falam o que aí no Espírito Santo, ['bõ]?!
     

    Istriano

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Leiam isso:
    There are three reliably established dialect-specific find-ings. One is that BP vowels are longer than EP vowels.
    V A, V C, and VII C . Another is that the vowel-intrinsic F0
    effect is greater in BP than in EP. VI B and VII D.
    The third is that the lower-mid vowel /ε/ is higher in EP than
    in BP, and that it is closer to /e/ in EP than in BP.
    and VII C, a situation which might signal a future merger.
    http://www.fon.hum.uva.nl/paul/papers/Portuguese2009.pdf

    The combined evidence of Sec. IV E leads to the conclusion that /ε/ is higher, less open, having a lower absolute
    and relative F1 in EP from Lisbon than in BP from São Paulo. None of the studies on Portuguese vowels mentioned
    in the Introduction reported this dialectal difference. Regarding the ideas in the Introduction, and the location of /ε/ near
    the center of the F1 continuum, we might well be watching an impending merger in EP of /ε/ into /e/, as is also happening in Italian, French, and Catalan
    Parece que a vogal é /ε/ em Portugal se pronuncia como [E] em vez de [ε]: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mid_front_unrounded_vowel
     
    Last edited:

    jay jaw

    New Member
    português
    Leiam isso:


    http://www.fon.hum.uva.nl/paul/papers/Portuguese2009.pdf



    Parece que a vogal é /ε/ em Portugal se pronuncia como [E] em vez de [ε]: Mid front unrounded vowel - Wikipedia
    interessante! Aqui onde eu moro no interior do estado de Pernambuco, os Es não estressados que tradicionalmente eram pronunciados como És vogal ɛ, estão mudando para a vogal central não-arredondado meio-aberta cujo símbolo é ɜ, por isso, em vez de pronunciamos téléfon, nós pronunciamos Téłɜfon, semelhante a pronuncia inglesa .
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top