Voy a poner mi granito de arena

< Previous | Next >

melvins17

New Member
Spanish
Hola, para decir esta expresión tan popular, alguien me puede corregir si sería correcto:

"I'm going to do my one bit"

Gracias de antemano.
 
  • melvins17

    New Member
    Spanish
    Hola y bienvenido.
    Por favor explica la situación.
    ¿Quién habla y a qué se refiere?
    Gracias.

    Hablaría yo, en primera persona y el contexto sería un proyecto que requiere la participación de muchas personas, por ejemplo, una causa benéfica.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    Para mí "bit" no funciona aquí, no solamente porque no se utiliza con ese sentido en mi dialecto, sino porque se podría confundir con la frase "do a bit" que viene siendo "hacer un show de comedia."

    Yo usaría "part".
    I'm going to do my part.
     

    SuperScuffer

    Senior Member
    English - GB
    Para mí "bit" no funciona aquí, no solamente porque no se utiliza con ese sentido en mi dialecto, sino porque se podría confundir con la frase "do a bit" que viene siendo "hacer un show de comedia."

    Yo usaría "part".
    I'm going to do my part.
    'I'm going to do my bit.' is a perfect translation in British English - it may well be a transatlantic difference.
     

    FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Para mí "bit" no funciona aquí, no solamente porque no se utiliza con ese sentido en mi dialecto, sino porque se podría confundir con la frase "do a bit" que viene siendo "hacer un show de comedia."

    Yo usaría "part".
    I'm going to do my part.
    Interesting. “Do my bit” sounds every bit :) as natural to me as “do my part.”
     

    gato radioso

    Senior Member
    spanish-spain
    The idea of the Spanish expression is:

    I´ll bring in my modest contribution... (to a bigger project involving a lot of people, money, etc...)

    I guess that any English expression, either British or American, conveying this nuance can work fine.
     
    Last edited:

    Cerros de Úbeda

    Banned
    UK
    Spanish - Spain (Galicia)
    Yo usaría "part".
    I'm going to do my part.
    En España, esta también se dice, en este contexto;

    'Voy a hacer / aportar mi parte.'
    (= Voy a poner / aportar mi granito de arena)


    The idea of the Spanish expression is:

    I´ll bring in my modest contribution... (to a bigger project involving a lot of people, money, etc...)

    Yes, it has a sense of it being 'modest', as a contribution (one which, by the way, is already implicit in the use of the phrasing 'I'll try and / to + INF').

    But it also has a sense of it 'being well intentioned', and also, one of one 'doing one's best to help' (= hacer su parte / lo que pueda).

    So, you could say;

    - I'll (try to) do my best (to help)
    - I'll (try and) do my utmost (to help).

    - I'll do what I can.
    (= I'll (try to) do as much as I can).
    - I'll (try and) do the most that I can.

    I guess that any English expression, either British or American, conveying this nuisance can work fine.
    I guess that's 'nuance', you meant.
     
    Last edited:

    gato radioso

    Senior Member
    spanish-spain
    Yes, it means it's a modest contribution.

    But it also has a sense of it 'being well intentioned', and of one 'doing one's best to help'. You could say;

    - I'll do what I can.
    (= I'll (try to) do as much as I can).
    - I'll (try to) do my best (to help)



    I guess that's 'nuance', you meant.
    Ostras, pues sí... era "nuance" ¿dónde tenía yo la cabeza? :thank you::thank you::D:D

    Y sí efectivamente, tiene los dos matices: modestia de la aportación y hacerse con buena intención (un deber cívico, deseo de ayudar a otros, etc...)
     

    SuperScuffer

    Senior Member
    English - GB

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hmmm. Here it’s only two cents.
    To give your two cents means to give an opinion (again, well-intentioned and humble)
    Galván is just being extra helpful. :)

    But I agree that this expression doesn't fit in the context of helping, because it only refers to giving an opinion, and not to doing anything constructive.

    By the way, the full expression is "to give my two cents' worth." That is, it means "here is my opinion, which may be worth only two cents." Originally it was meant as a humorous statement, but now it's so common that nobody thinks of it that way.
     

    Cerros de Úbeda

    Banned
    UK
    Spanish - Spain (Galicia)
    I agree with you, Gengo.

    However, the Spanish 'Voy a poner mi granito de arena' is sometimes also used referring to giving an opinion.

    On occasion, an opinion may also be helpful, and we call it 'a contribution'. As an example, we can think of journalistic opinion pieces and columns, which are called 'contributions'. We have to look no further than online forums, where we also call opinions and posts, contributions.

    In those cases, the English 'I'll give my two cents' would also work. It would depend on context - although the OP's post doesn't quite make clear if it refers to giving help or opinion.


    (*) DLE
    - grano de arena

    1. m. Aportación a una obra o fin determinado que quien la hace presenta, por modestia, como pequeña.

    grano | Diccionario de la lengua española
     
    Last edited:

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    However, the Spanish 'Voy a poner mi granito de arena' is sometimes also used referring to giving an opinion.

    In those cases, the English 'I'll give my two cents' would also work. It would depend on context - although the OP's post doesn't quite make clear if it refers to giving help or opinion.
    Yes, I knew that it could also be used that way, but had been assuming that the context here was that of helping (the OP said, "el contexto sería un proyecto que requiere la participación de muchas personas, por ejemplo, una causa benéfica"), but now that I think about it, I agree that the given context doesn't clearly indicate whether the participación here is help or opinion.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    In those cases, the English 'I'll give my two cents' would also work. It would depend on context - although the OP's post doesn't quite make clear if it refers to giving help or opinion.
    I disagree. To me it's pretty clear that in this thread we're talking about participation/work on a project, which requires more than just an opinion.
    Hablaría yo, en primera persona y el contexto sería un proyecto que requiere la participación de muchas personas, por ejemplo, una causa benéfica.
     

    Cerros de Úbeda

    Banned
    UK
    Spanish - Spain (Galicia)
    I disagree. To me it's pretty clear that in this thread we're talking about participation/work on a project, which requires more than just an opinion.

    Weeell... We'll have to agree to disagree, because I have yet to see any project where there isn't some type of decision-making involved, which, of course, means debating, making proposals, giving opinions and so on...

    I think both are perfectly possible, it would just depend on the situation along the project.
     

    Aguas Claras

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I don't think the meaning is clear from the context, given that the OP says:
    Hablaría yo, en primera persona y el contexto sería un proyecto que requiere la participación de muchas personas, por ejemplo, una causa benéfica.
    He/she could perfectly well be addressing a group and giving an opinion, in which case, I think "I'm going to put in my two cents' worth" would be an appropriate translation.

    If, however, the intention is to say that he/she will be working actively on the project, my choice would be "I'm going to do my bit".
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top