VW pronunciation

Hakro

Senior Member
Finnish - Finland
We have recently learned how to pronounce BMW, short for Bayerische Motoren Werke, in different languages.

There's another automobile brand name that is even more complex: VW, short for Volkswagen.

The original German pronunciation is 'fau veh' ('fow veh).

In Finnish we are used to pronounce it 'veh veh'.

How is it pronounced in your language?
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    In colloquial Palestinian Arabic, we say either "volksvaagen" or "vols" for short.

    The sound "v" does not exist in Arabic, but we usually use it for foreign words.

    We do not use the VW abbreviation.
     

    ElaineG

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    In Am. English, we say VW "Vee Double-you", as in the beloved "Vee Double-you Bug."

    If we say the whole name, it's very Americanized: Vokes-wagon.
     

    Anatoli

    Senior Member
    Native: русский (Russian), home country: English
    Russian: Фольксваген - follows the German pronunciation [folksvaagen], only the accent is on "vaa" and L is palatalised. Of course "das Volk" [follk] means people, not folk, "der Wagen" [vahghen] means both a car and carriage (wagon). Usually not abbreviated.

    In Chinese it would be a big article describing various pronunciations, some have nothing to do with the original (literal translation) - 大众汽车 dàzhòng qìchē (used in mainland China) or a phonetical transliteration 沃尔夫斯堡 wò'ěrfūsībǎo - only remotely reminding the original

    http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%A4%A7%E4%BC%97%E6%B1%BD%E8%BD%A6

    I think some people use the VW abbreviation

    Japanese:
    フォルクスワーゲン forukusuwaagen (all u's are almost silent) and r is light - something between a lightly rolled r and l.

    http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/フォルクスワーゲン
     

    Honour

    Senior Member
    Türkçe, Türkiye
    In turkish
    it is read "volkswagean", "ve ve" (veh veh) or "vos vos"
    I have to say that "vos vos" is a special acronym for vw beetle.
    (btw, we call vw beetle as vw kaplumbağa which means turtle :) )
     

    jadzia

    New Member
    English (US)
    Mexico is "volchito" (mostly when referring to the beetle). The rest are usually referred to using just the model. Some people I've heard pronounce the American way the best they can or just ve-doble-u.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    In Portuguese, apart from the German name which has already been mentioned above, there is also the affectionate nickname carocha, which means "bug".
     

    Hakro

    Senior Member
    Finnish - Finland
    (I'm hardly waiting that somebody starts a thread about Mercedes.)
    There's no pronunciation problem with Mercedes. The idea of this thread (in case you didn't get it) is the pronunciation of the German letters v (fau or veh) and w (weh or double-u) in different languages, not the word Volkswagen.
     

    olivinha

    Senior Member
    Português, Brasil
    The idea of this thread (in case you didn't get it) is the pronunciation of the German letters v (fau or veh) and w (weh or double-u) in different languages, not the word Volkswagen.
    Oopsie, I had also misunderstood it. Sorry.
    :eek:
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Ah, then! In Portuguese:

    V - (The letter "v" is pronounced as in English, French, etc.)
    W - dáblio (based on the English name), or duplo vê (literally "double ve")

    There's no pronunciation problem with Mercedes. The idea of this thread (in case you didn't get it) is the pronunciation of the German letters v (fau or veh) and w (weh or double-u) in different languages, not the word Volkswagen.
    Honestly, did anyone get it?
     

    Maja

    Senior Member
    Serbian, Serbia
    Honestly, did anyone get it?
    I didn't!!! :eek:
    The idea of this thread (in case you didn't get it) is the pronunciation of the German letters v (fau or veh) and w (weh or double-u) in different languages, not the word Volkswagen.
    In that case I can't help because I don't speak German and do not know the rules of transliteration regarding German letters.
    But I can tell you that we don't use the abbreviation for Volkswagen!
     

    olivinha

    Senior Member
    Português, Brasil
    Ah, then! In Portuguese:

    V - (The letter "v" is pronounced as in English, French, etc.)
    W - dáblio (based on the English name), or duplo vê (literally "double ve")
    In Brazil, it would be similar to the above even though people there hardly ever (if not never) refer to a volkswagen as a VW.

    O
    Out, o teu carocha é o nosso fusquinha (de fusca).
     

    samanthalee

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, English - [Singapore]
    In Chinese it would be a big article describing various pronunciations, some have nothing to do with the original (literal translation) - 大众汽车 dàzhòng qìchē (used in mainland China) or a phonetical transliteration 沃尔夫斯堡 wò'ěrfūsībǎo - only remotely reminding the original
    Volkswagon's name in China means Motor of the Mass, which is a literal translation and has no pronunciation issue.

    Its name in Taiwan [Fu Si Motor], Hong Kong [Fu Shi Motor], and Malaysia/Singapore [Fu Shi Wei Gen], are phonetic translation.

    So "Volks" sounds like "Foose" (ie. subsitute the G in Goose with F)

    And "Wagen" sounds like "Way-gan" (gan is pronounced like the last bit in "Ronald Reagan")

    By the way, 沃尔夫斯堡 wò'ěrfūsībǎo refers to Wolfsburg, not yet another chinese translation of Volkswagen
     

    Anatoli

    Senior Member
    Native: русский (Russian), home country: English
    Volkswagon's name in China means Motor of the Mass, which is a literal translation and has no pronunciation issue.

    Its name in Taiwan [Fu Si Motor], Hong Kong [Fu Shi Motor], and Malaysia/Singapore [Fu Shi Wei Gen], are phonetic translation.

    So "Volks" sounds like "Foose" (ie. subsitute the G in Goose with F)

    And "Wagen" sounds like "Way-gan" (gan is pronounced like the last bit in "Ronald Reagan")

    By the way, 沃尔夫斯堡 wò'ěrfūsībǎo refers to Wolfsburg, not yet another chinese translation of Volkswagen
    Thanks, why don't you use the standard pinyin for transliteration? Different ways to transliterate only make it more confusing, IMHO.

    I found 福斯 (fúsī) and 福士 fúshì for Volks- but not the rest. How do you write it in Chinese characters?

    I am sure there is another - phonetic version in mainland China (different from dàzhòngqìchē) but I couldn't find it.
     

    samanthalee

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, English - [Singapore]
    Thanks, why don't you use the standard pinyin for transliteration? Different ways to transliterate only make it more confusing, IMHO.

    I found 福斯 (fúsī) and 福士 fúshì for Volks- but not the rest. How do you write it in Chinese characters?

    I am sure there is another - phonetic version in mainland China (different from dàzhòngqìchē) but I couldn't find it.
    Hi Anatoli, I have been pondering on how to make the Mandarin pronunciation understood by all on this thread. Pinyin is a learned romanised form of Mandarin and is understood only by learners of Mandarin.

    The person who started this thread asked to know how "Volkswagen" sounds like in other languages. I believe Pinyin isn't going to help him know how it sound like in Mandarin.

    We called it 福士伟根 in Singapore and Malaysia.

    P.S. actually I think I kind of did give use Pinyin in my original msg. I write [Fu Shi Motor] and [Fu Shi Wei Gen]...okay, I didn't specify the tone...
     

    Anatoli

    Senior Member
    Native: русский (Russian), home country: English
    Thanks, samanthalee. Here's a bunch of linguist/semilinguists. A person who has interest in Chinese will understand or look up. "Way gan" is more confusing than "wei gen", since you're trying to adjust to English unphonetical and ambiguous spelling.
     

    MarX

    Banned
    Indonesian, Indonesia
    We have recently learned how to pronounce BMW, short for Bayerische Motoren Werke, in different languages.

    There's another automobile brand name that is even more complex: VW, short for Volkswagen.

    The original German pronunciation is 'fau veh' ('fow veh).

    In Finnish we are used to pronounce it 'veh veh'.

    How is it pronounced in your language?
    In Indonesian it is fè wè.
     

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    There's no pronunciation problem with Mercedes. The idea of this thread (in case you didn't get it) is the pronunciation of the German letters v (fau or veh) and w (weh or double-u) in different languages, not the word Volkswagen.
    Well, the problem with that is: it seems in some languages the abbreviation VW is not used when referring to the car; see Maja's post:
    In that case I can't help because I don't speak German and do not know the rules of transliteration regarding German letters.
    But I can tell you that we don't use the abbreviation for Volkswagen!
    In Serbian it is just "volcvagen" (where "c" = "ts", thus "foltsvahgen" in near-English spelling).
    And for the question concerning VW there's no answer - or if a Serbian native would pronounce VW he or she would use the pronunciation of those letters according to the Serbian alphabet, but this still would not be the idiomatic way for referring to a VW car.
     

    phosphore

    Senior Member
    Serbian
    In Serbian: folcvagen (ks in folksvagen became c in speech). I am not sure though if it is the same in a written form!
    I have never heard anyone saying fol[ts]vagen: we say fol[ks]vagen, we do not use the abbreviation.
     

    enoo

    Senior Member
    French - France
    In French:
    Something like "Volsvagen", (the "v" are the same as the english "v", and the k is not pronounced.)
    I never heard anyone use the abbreviation.

    I guess that's because Vols-vag-en is 3 syllables long, and VW (Vé-dou-ble-vé) is 4 syllables long ...
    However, it's almost always written VW.

    (I'm not sure that I cut the syllables in the right place, but that gives an idea)
     

    kusurija

    Senior Member
    Lithuania Czech
    In Czech we say it without abbreviation: [folksvágen], sometimes we say "Brouk" (beetle), but this is only for historic types of VW.

    In Lithuanian we say it also without abbreviation: [folksvagenas], sometimes we say only second part of name; i.e. "Golfas", "Polo" and so on.
     
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