w/, with ?

  • Lis48

    Senior Member
    English - British
    There is no other abbreviation I can think of that is just a letter followed by a slash. They are all letters followed by a slash and another letter e.g. N/A for not applicable. So might I suggest that w/ is the opposite of the abbreviation w/o meaning without, so you just leave out the o for out, to mean with?
     

    alidoro

    Senior Member
    Italian
    From the discussion I don't understand if w/ is common or not... And, if so, would you write w/view or w/ view (leaving a space between the slash and the noun)?

    Many thanks!
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    From the discussion I don't understand if w/ is common or not... And, if so, would you write w/view or w/ view (leaving a space between the slash and the noun)?

    Many thanks!
    I don't believe w/ is common as an abbreviation for with.
    If you explain what you mean by w/view and post an example sentence it would help ... although as I have no idea what this would be an abbreviation for I don't expect I'll be able to help anyway :)
     

    alidoro

    Senior Member
    Italian
    W/view was just an example... I'd like to know - and you already answered no! - if it's common. I was wondering, for instance, if "A room with sea view" could be shortened as "A room w/ sea view" or "A room w/sea view"...

    Many thanks!
     

    Gwan

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    I was taught w/ along with a number of other abbreviations such as between /./ and therefore (three dots in the form of a triangle) at school as aids for notetaking. So in my mind they're common, but that doesn't mean they actually are terribly widespread, I suppose.
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    In text-speak, w/ = with, is very common.
    To do the opposite, people (used to) generally use the other slash w\ = without.

    I've noticed a drop in the trend of the backslash though, probably because people were confused with the ordering of the slashes and now I'd say what James mentioned earlier is the most common (w/o).

    In answer to the question of "Why?", like I said it's mainly txt-speak, so where you can save characters and type a message quickly, any space-saver is employed.
    So rather than using 19 characters ("To be or not to be?"), if Shakespeare was writing a note on his Blackberry today about his upcoming novel, he might note it as "2 b or nt 2 b?", which saves 5 letters, and might spare him the 10p of a text message to his editor.
     

    preppie

    Senior Member
    American English (Mostly MidAtlantic)
    A great number of abbreviation (like w/ or three dots in a triangle) are borrowed from the jargon of specific areas of interest. The three dots is math notation. I've seen the w/ on prescriptions (and other medical notes) as in Take w/ water or Take w/ meals. (Without, however, is a lower case s with a bar over the top).
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I was wondering, for instance, if "A room with sea view" could be shortened as "A room w/ sea view" or "A room w/sea view"...

    Many thanks!
    I think it's best to include the space, otherwise the slash indicates a sort of "optionality", (I'll have fish/chicken when I get home), that would be either fish or chicken, so just to avoid that I'd say the space after w/ makes it clear that it means "with". Though others might have no trouble in confusing that and have no space.

    My preference would be for a space.
     

    sandpiperlily

    Senior Member
    I was taught w/ along with a number of other abbreviations such as between /./ and therefore (three dots in the form of a triangle) at school as aids for notetaking. So in my mind they're common, but that doesn't mean they actually are terribly widespread, I suppose.
    I agree -- I learned these abbreviations in school before "text speak" was common. I believe w/ is very common in the US. I use it all the time and have never been questioned about it.
     

    alidoro

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Thank you all!
    Actually, it's the translation of a short description text, and the use of w/ could save just 2 characters. But as it's a sequence of technical terms - as "Foreign OPA in Currency w/ deal (UK exchange) - online settlement - Credit interprocedural c/a" - a little compression could help. I know OPA is not an English (or American) term, but I've been told not to translate it and to leave it as acronym.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    In text-speak, w/ = with, is very common.
    To do the opposite, people (used to) generally use the other slash w\ = without.

    I've noticed a drop in the trend of the backslash though, probably because people were confused with the ordering of the slashes and now I'd say what James mentioned earlier is the most common (w/o).

    In answer to the question of "Why?", like I said it's mainly txt-speak, so where you can save characters and type a message quickly, any space-saver is employed.
    So rather than using 19 characters ("To be or not to be?"), if Shakespeare was writing a note on his Blackberry today about his upcoming novel, he might note it as "2 b or nt 2 b?", which saves 5 letters, and might spare him the 10p of a text message to his editor.
    "w/" and "w/o" are much, much older than text-speak, however. I'm sure I can find examples from early 20th century classified ads. I imagine they're much older than that.
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    "w/" and "w/o" are much, much older than text-speak, however. I'm sure I can find examples from early 20th century classified ads. I imagine they're much older than that.
    Oh yeah, I can imagine.
    I didn't mean to (and don't think I did) imply that one was older than the other, only that in text-speak there was a prevailing pattern, which then was replaced by another.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    W/E is often the way weekend is abbreviated by those short of space or quickly taking notes. I had not seen w/ as an abbreviation for with until I moved to north America. I used to use c with a bar over it like the s with a bar over it (noted above); the bar indicated a Latin origin : cum and sine meaning with and without.
     
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    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    I think of w/ as mostly a space-saver when you are paying by the line, by the word or by the letter, as in a real estate advertisement. "Rm w/view" is shorter than "Room with view"

    I also think the slash somehow shows this is an abbreviation. Just writing "w" by itself doesn't work and neither does "w." (with a period). I wouldn't write "rm w view" or "rm w. view" or "rm wview."
     
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    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    W/E is often the way weekend is abbreviated by those short of space or quickly taking notes. I had not seen w/ as an abbreviation for with until I moved to north America. I used to use c with a bar over it like the s with a bar over it (noted above); the bar indicated a Latin origin : cum and sine meaning with and without.
    Thanks for reminding me of this! Oh yes, we were taught to use c with a bar as well at school, and that's the abbreviation most of us used when taking notes at university in the early 80s. (Didn't use the s with a bar though.) It's listed here as a medical abbreviation.
     
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