wage vs salary

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EllyDicious

Senior Member
Albanian
Hello, I'd like to know the difference between wage and salary.

Also, how do I express the idea that I'd like my net wage/salary to be 600Euro for the first 6 months hoping to be increased after this period. Is there a non-arrogant way to say it?

thank you in advance.
 
  • dharasty

    Senior Member
    American English
    "Wage" is usually "payment per hour worked". It usually implies if you work a few extra hours you DO get paid extra. (A wage is usually quoted on an hourly basis: "$8/hour". However, there is nothing wrong with someone saying "my weekly wages are $320".)

    "Salary" is usually "a fixed payment per period worked". It usually implies if you work a few extra hours you DON'T get paid extra. (A salary is often quoted on an annualized basis: "$60,000/year". However, there is nothing wrong with someone saying "my monthly salary is $5000".)

    I think the phrase "net wages for six months" is comparable to "salary for six months". So I find you construction clear.

    I take it in a neutral sense; your construction does not [to me] sound arrogant that "wages" are inferior to "salary", if that is your concern.

    I take your construction to be appropriate if you don't know if you will be pay will be wage-based or salary-based.

    However, you can avoid the whole issue with this: "I'd like my total earnings to be 600Euro for the first six months", and leave the words wage/salary out of it.
     
    Last edited:

    EllyDicious

    Senior Member
    Albanian
    Alright, now that I know the difference between salary and wage I'd like to point out that 600Euro was about the salary per MONTH - not for the whole 6 months.

    So I'd request the employer this:

    Judging by my qualifications and the nature of the work, I expect my salary to be 600Euros a month, for the first 6 months with the hope of a raise in the salary after this period.

    Did I say it correctly?
     

    dharasty

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think that is clear.

    You still have the option to side-step the whole wage/salary thing: "I expect to earn 600 Euros per month".

    After all, if your contract says "you'll be paid 600/month", that would usually be called a salary. But if your contract says "you'll be paid 3.75/hour" (and you expect to work 160 hours per month), that would usually be called a wage... but you earn the same 600.
     

    morior_invictus

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Please bear in mind that what matters to an employer is gross pay. An employer wants to know what gross pay you are willing to receive to be able to estimate how much you would cost them. They don't care about what you would like to be left with after all deductions and surely do not need to calculate gross pay from your net pay expectations. So I suggest you always talk about gross amounts.
     

    EllyDicious

    Senior Member
    Albanian
    Well the thing is that If I express my request for the gross pay, I don't know how much I'd get in hand.

    Can I say: My goal is to earn a net 600 Euro for the first six months, and, based on my performance, an increment of 40%percent after that.

    Is that correct?
     

    dharasty

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes you could say that; it is clear.

    But now you cross in to the question of the "customary" way to ask for that. Where I am from, it is customary to negotiate your gross pay, not your net pay.

    As morior_invictus points out, employers usually cannot know exactly your tax situation; that is up to you. I think you are going to need to find some way to estimate how much of your gross pay will be withheld for taxes and benefits.

    I would suggest you ask someone in a similar financial situation as you "how much of your gross pay is withheld from your paycheck"? If he estimates 15%, then I would suggest you simply ask for 15% more in your gross pay: 600 + 15% = 690 or about 700.
     
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