wait a couple of days

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Wind_of_fall

Senior Member
Peru Spanish
Can anyone tell me which one is correct?

"Now I just have to wait a couple of days to receive my degree"

"Now I just have to wait for a couple of days to receive my degree"

If none is correct, How should I say it?

Thanks a lot!!
 
  • Oven

    Senior Member
    Chile, Spanish,pseudo-English, lame portuguese and french
    I'd say both of them are correct. Though, there is a slight difference in meaning.
     

    Mariaguadalupe

    Senior Member
    Mexico, Spanish-English
    Wind_of_fall said:
    Can anyone tell me which one is correct?

    "Now I just have to wait a couple of days to receive my degree"

    "Now, I just have to wait for a couple of days to receive my degree":cross:

    If none is correct, How should I say it?

    Thanks a lot!!
    Actually the second one doesn't sound right. You might "wait for a special moment"---something will happen at that special moment
    but if they tell you "wait a moment" --that means in a few seconds...

     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I agree that to some it might not "sound right," but option "b" is still grammatically correct.

    Either answers the question "how long?"

    How long will you have to wait?
    - A couple of days.
    - I'll have to wait for a couple of days.

    For example. I went to the hospital the other day to see the doctor. After sitting in the waiting room for several hours, I was sent to the lab where they drew some blood. I am waiting for my test results.

    The doctor told me I'll need to wait for a couple of days until the results come back.

    The doctor also told me to be patient, wait a couple of days and the rash should disappear. :eek:
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Yes, they're both correct. And both fine.

    "Wait" is more indefinite than "wait + any modifier," so "wait a minute" is designed to make you stop or pause, and "wait for a minute" is more an invitation to delay doing whatever it was you were about to do.

    That's probably the gist of the difference. A simple "wait" means something like "hold up" or "stop!" "Wait for" means "pause (a certain period-- a minute)" or "expect (someone, some signal to proceed)."

    "Wait here." Stay, don't act, no specific indication of when or whether to proceed.

    "Wait for me." Hold up a sec (if I'm running up behind you). Don't start without me (if I'm on the phone, calling from far enough away that you might have to wait for an hour).

    "Wait for the light to change."

    "Wait for an hour, that'll give them plenty of time to get ready for us."

    "Wait an hour, then try the number again."

    "I'm just gonna wait a couple days and see what happens."

    "I'm not gonna wait all day."
     
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