wait for your train at/on platform 3 [at/on?]

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Tenacious Learner

Senior Member
Spanish
Hi teachers,
A: You should wait for your train at/on platform three.
I believe it is 'at platform three'.
But, why couldn't it be 'on platform three'?

Thanks in advance.
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Where I'm from, I would expect to await the train 'on platform (say) five', and once the train had pulled into the station, a recorded announcement would proclaim 'the train now standing at platform five is a (say) Clapham Junction train, calling at all stations to Clapham Junction ....'.
     

    Eduardo Rodrigues

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (BR)
    Why can't I wait for the train nearby platform three, instead of at or on it, I can see the train coming and it won't be a problem to run to get it, supposing the distance is short, and that I don't have any sight or locomotion difficulties. I could be waiting sitting on a Café inside the railway station, just a couple of metres distant from the platform. Fair enough?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Why can't I wait for the train nearby platform three, instead of at or on it, I can see the train coming and it won't be a problem to run to get it, supposing the distance is short, and that I don't have any sight or locomotion difficulties. I could be waiting sitting on a Café inside the railway station, just a couple of metres distant from the platform. Fair enough?
    Or if the cafe is on the floor overlooking the platform and you know there's a speedy escalator: You could wait for your train over Platform 3. :rolleyes:
     

    Eduardo Rodrigues

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (BR)
    It could even be underground, it could be a metro station with glass rooftop over platform three, so that you can see when the train is coming! :D
     

    Prashant Solanki

    Member
    India- Hindi & English
    I would suggest not. :) To me, this suggests you're to the side of Platform 3.
    Hello sir,
    My doubt is similar to this one.

    The train arrived at/on the platform.

    I think we can use either but my book says only "on" is correct.

    Please clarify it.

    Thanks!
     

    AnythingGoes

    Senior Member
    English - USA (Midwest/Appalachia)
    Hello sir,
    My doubt is similar to this one.

    The train arrived at/on the platform.

    I think we can use either but my book says only "on" is correct.

    Please clarify it.
    With on, it sounds like the train left the track and found itself atop the platform with the waiting passengers and bags. I'd say at.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I would wait on the platform, because that's where I'll be, but the train will arrive at the platform, because it will be on the tracks. Two different prepositions are used because my position, and the train's position, relative to the platform are different. There is no reason to expect the same preposition to be used in both cases.

    If something has another position relative to the platform, still another preposition might be correct: mice live under the platform, pigeons fly over the platform, snow falls around the platform, Dickens wrote about the platform, wood is rotting within the platform, and so on.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    I would wait on the platform, because that's where I'll be, but the train will arrive at the platform, because it will be on the tracks. Two different prepositions are used because my position, and the train's position, relative to the platform are different. There is no reason to expect the same preposition to be used in both cases.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
     
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