wakey-wakey / rise and shine

Shandol

Senior Member
Persian - 𐎱𐎾𐎿𐎡
a. Wakey-wakey, kids. It's time for school!
b. Come on, kids! Rise and shine! It's time for school!


Hello.
Could they be used interchangeably without much difference in meaning? Is wakey-wakey always used humorously (I'd reckon its used is restricted to BE, though not sure.)?
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Wakey wakey rise and shine" is common enough in BrE as a way of getting people out of bed, but the need does not often exist with adults, and it is mostly used with children. "Wakey wakey" is common on its own without "rise and shine", but "rise and shine" is a lot less common without "wakey wakey" or some other expression. Your "Come on kids! Rise and shine!" sounds fine, but we imagine that this follows some other instruction to get out of bed (perhaps one that was more or less ignored).
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    (I'd reckon its used is restricted to BE, though not sure.)?
    Yes, "wakey-wakey" is not common in American English (and certainly not paired with "eggs and bake-y"). "Rise and shine" is something my mother said to me in the morning when I was a child. I assume it's still in use.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English (US - northeast)
    In my dialect of AE, "wakey-wakey" is humorous if said to young children, sarcastic (mocking;insulting) if said to teen-agers or adults.

    "Time to get up" is normal. "Rise and shine" is an old saying. Before 1916 it was a religious expression. Since then it is just an idiom meaning "time to get up".
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English (US - northeast)
    I did not say "outdated". I mentioned "1916" and "since then". "Since 1916" means "from 1916 until now".

    EDIT: I also say "it is an idiom", not "it was an idiom".
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    If you want dated, my mother also liked to recite the Robert Louis Stevenson poem about the birdie with the yellow bill to wake me up.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's featured in the movie Kill Bill. "Wakey wakey, eggs and bakey" or however you spell it to preserve the correct vowel sound.

    I think that's the only time I've ever heard it used.

    And in the movie she wasn't so much asleep as unconscious.
     
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