walk around (the edge / rim / sides of) the rice paddy

wanabee

Senior Member
Japanese
Dear all,

She walked around the edge of the rice paddy to get to the other side.
She walked around the sides of the rice paddy to get to the other side.
She walked around the rim of the rice paddy to get to the other side.
She walked around the rice paddy to get to the other side.

I made up the sentences. Could you tell me if you had the same picture in mind when you read them?
I would appreciate any comments.
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Aren't two rice paddies adjacent, in many cases? I'm not sure.

    She walked between two rice paddies?

    Otherwise, I'd say "walked along the edge of the paddy".
     
    Last edited:

    wanabee

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Aren't two rice paddies adjacent, in many cases? I'm not sure.
    She walked between two rice paddies?
    Otherswise, I'd say "walked along the edge of the paddy".
    Thank you very much, perpend!
    I have in mind a rectangular paddy which stands alone, and she walked from one side of it to the opposite side by walking along the edge of it.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    In that case "around the edge of the paddy" (your own solution) sounds very good, wanabee!
     

    wanabee

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    In that case "around the edge of the paddy" (your own solution) sounds very good, wanabee!
    Thank you very much, perpend!
    How do the other options sound?
    She walked around the sides of the rice paddy to get to the other side.
    She walked around the rim of the rice paddy to get to the other side.
    She walked around the rice paddy to get to the other side.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    The "rim of the rice paddy" sounds wrong to me: it makes me think of a volcano!

    Either of the other two would be fine, though.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    'Rim' is generally used with regard to the edge or lip of (roughly) circular things, especially raised things, such as volcanoes already mentioned, and (e.g.) water tanks, bowls, saucepans, etc.

    The Pacific Rim is however neither raised nor circular - but it certainly isn't rectangular either!
     

    wanabee

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    'Rim' is generally used with regard to the edge or lip of (roughly) circular things, especially raised things, such as volcanoes already mentioned, and (e.g.) water tanks, bowls, saucepans, etc.
    The Pacific Rim is however neither raised nor circular - but it certainly isn't rectangular either!
    I see. Thank you very much, DonnyB and Linkway!
    So if the paddy is round, I guess it may be possible to "walk around the rim of the paddy," since it's like a bowl filled with water, like The Pacific Rim! :) I'm not sure...
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    wanabee said:
    She walked around the sides of the rice paddyto get to the other side.
    has a few too many sides in it for me, wanabee.

    She walked around the right side of the rice paddy to get to the opposite side.

    or, if you mean that it's something she did habitually, and it didn't matter which side, you might stick with around the rice paddy, because my version is already a little too technical.
     
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