walk/ go forward

AidaGlass

Senior Member
Persian-Iran
Hi
I've written this sentence myself
When I can reach to my goals with my feet, why not train them not to walk/ go forward?
Which verb should I use? Walk or go forward? Or neither?!
 
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  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I'm afraid I don't understand what you are trying to say. Could you please explain using other words?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I asked for an explanation using different words, not a re-arrangement of the same words.:)

    I'm still not sure what you mean. Perhaps someone else will be able to answer.

    It sounds to me as if you're trying to translate a proverb/idiom into English. If that's the case, please explain what that idiom is and the situation in which it's used.
     

    AidaGlass

    Senior Member
    Persian-Iran
    I can't explain better than this. You can reach to your goals with/ by your feet, why not teach them to walk?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    You can reach to your goals with/ by your feet, why not teach them to walk?
    It is better like this, your double negative in your first post was very confusing.

    edit to add: I mean better in the sense of aiding our understanding, but it is still not a grammatical sentence!
    And it seems we are still not really sure what you aim to say.

    Are you translating a proverb?
     
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    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    You're not explaining, Aida. You're attempting (unsuccessfully) to translate. Please try to tell us what your proverb means, not what it says.

    At the moment it's not making any sense, and here's why (or this is how I understand what you're saying):
    If you can (already) reach your goals with (i.e. by using) your feet, how is this possible other than if they already know how to walk? Therefore the idea of teaching them to walk is daft. You would be teaching them something they already know.

    Or is that what the proverb is trying to say? It would then be similar to the English saying: Don't try to teach your grandmother how to suck eggs.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I think (confirmation needed from the OP of course) that it means that if something can do much more than what it's intended to do, why not use it for its basic purpose as well?

    If your four-year-old child can understand complex arithmetic concepts, isn't it time he learnt the alphabet?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I have a hunch that it means:

    If your goals are easily attainable (without any special effort), why not set yourself more distant goals, and do your best to reach them.
     
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