walk in the byelanes

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Pidginboy

Senior Member
India-Local dialect
In the evenings of all holidays, I walk on the byelanes of the industrial estate, for relaxation.

Is the above sentence, particularly the bold phrase, correct and idiomatic?
 
  • teksch

    Senior Member
    English - American
    In the evenings of all holidays, I walk on the byelanes of the industrial estate, for relaxation.

    Is the above sentence, particularly the bold phrase, correct and idiomatic?
    One way you can check to see if this sentence is correct is to take out the part set aside by the commas – “…I walk on the byelanes…”. By doing this, the sentence reads – “In the evenings of all holidays for relaxation.”

    The commas are not needed. Try it this way “In the evenings of all holidays I walk on the byelanes of the industrial estate for relaxation.”

    What is a byelane?
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I believe bye-lanes takes a hyphen, doesn't it? It is unfamiliar to me. I assume it means something like side roads or side streets. I don't think "bye-lanes" would be expected by most American English speakers. It might be quite familiar to British English speakers.

    I would say: "I walk down..." or "I walk through..." but not "..walk on..."

    Here is how I would re-word it, including a guess at the meaning of bye-lanes:

    "On holiday evenings I walk through the side streets of the industrial estate for relaxation."

    I am not quite sure what an industrial estate is, either, to be perfectly frank. Is it a housing development associated with a factory?
     
    I've never heard 'byelanes' before.

    An industrial esate is an urban area, usually on the outskirts of a town or city, where small manufacturing firms, distribution warehouses or business premises are located. They are normally deserted outside office hours, and are fine places to take solitary walks, to exercise your dog or for learner drivers to practise their skills.

    'Side roads' is the nearest I can come up with, though I don't like that much, either.

    'Side streets' doesn't work, as they are found in the town, lined with residential properties.

    Neither does 'lanes' (from which somebody seems to have coined 'byelanes'), which are narrow, tree- or hedge-lined rural roads.

    I'd be tempted to rephrase the original post as

    'On holiday evenings I walk round the industrial estate for relaxation'.

    Rover
     
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