walk / step

Alfonso

New Member
España / español
What the diferencce between walk and step ??
walk in - step in
walk through - step through

MABY THANKS - ALFONSO
 
  • gotitadeleche

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    Alfonso said:
    What the diferencce between walk and step ??
    walk in - step in
    walk through - step through

    MABY THANKS - ALFONSO
    Although in some contexts (such as the examples you gave) they can be used interchangeably, generally, walking is the continual process of taking one step after another. One would never go out for a step, but one would go out for a walk. But if it is a very short distance, you can say "walk over here," or "step over here."

    I hope this helps.
     

    Alfonso

    New Member
    España / español
    So

    step for short distance, and walk, long distance, but can one put the limit short and long ??

    gotitadeleche said:
    Although in some contexts (such as the examples you gave) they can be used interchangeably, generally, walking is the continual process of taking one step after another. One would never go out for a step, but one would go out for a walk. But if it is a very short distance, you can say "walk over here," or "step over here."

    I hope this helps.
     

    gotitadeleche

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    Alfonso said:
    So

    step for short distance, and walk, long distance, but can one put the limit short and long ??
    Unfortunately, it isn't that simple. Remember I said a walk is a process of taking steps. So you could take a walk of 1000 steps. One can also "step out for a walk." Or if you go to the doctor's office and he has gone out to run a quick errand, the receptionist might say "The doctor has just stepped out, but he will be back in 10 minutes. Please have a seat."

    I guess you could say that a step is a unit of a walk, but it has some idiomatic uses.
     
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