want that I will become

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primroseheel

Senior Member
korean-korea
Hi,

They want me to become a lawyer.

If I change this sentence to one with a that clause...

They want that I will become a lawyer.

Is that correct?
Can I use the verb 'want' with a that clause?
If not, how can I make a similar meaning sentence without to-V?
 
  • Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    You could say "They want that I become a lawyer" (no "will") which is grammatically correct, but it doesn't sound natural.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    That's grammatically correct too but with a slightly different meaning - it refers to what they would want in a particular situation. Again, it's an unlikely sentence to be said.
     

    primroseheel

    Senior Member
    korean-korea
    You could say "They want that I become a lawyer" (no "will") which is grammatically correct, but it doesn't sound natural.
    Thanks. Can I use the verb 'plan' with a that clause then?
    I plan to go to NYC this year.
    = I plan that I go to NYC this year.
     

    primroseheel

    Senior Member
    korean-korea
    That's grammatically correct too but with a slightly different meaning - it refers to what they would want in a particular situation. Again, it's an unlikely sentence to be said.
    Thanks. Can I use the verb 'plan' with a that clause then?
    I plan to go to NYC this year.
    = I plan that I go to NYC this year.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Your first sentence is fine. (It would usually be New York in speech, not NYC.)

    Your second sentence sounds unnatural and I would advise against using it.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I agree with Keith. :)

    They sound to me like bad translations from languages such as Italian where you can't say "They want me to become a lawyer" and you have to do it as "They want that I become a lawyer", using a subjunctive. But that just sounds stilted in English.
     

    Ivan_I

    Banned
    Russian
    You could say "They want that I become a lawyer" (no "will") which is grammatically correct, but it doesn't sound natural.
    I agree with Keith. :)

    They sound to me like bad translations from languages such as Italian where you can't say "They want me to become a lawyer" and you have to do it as "They want that I become a lawyer", using a subjunctive. But that just sounds stilted in English.
    So, is it correct but stilted? Or is it stilted and incorrect?
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    So, is it correct but stilted? Or is it stilted and incorrect?
    It's irrelevant. Nobody ever says it. Search on Ngrams if you don't believe me.

    Oh, yes, we'll all understand it because we're intelligent people who have come across the subjunctive in phrases like "I propose that he become our spokesman", and we're kind people who forgive foreigners for their mistakes. But don't let that fool you. Nobody says it; it is not English.
     
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