Want you to go / that you go

  • Y la segunda frase no está bien?
    "I want that you go there"
    Lo digo porque un profesor mio, me dijo que sí estaba bien. Y tambien me gustaria saber porque esta mal.
    Saludos
     

    rogelio

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Henrik,
    Quchu is right- only the first one is correct. La segunda frase no esta bien. A lo mejor el profesor estaba traduciendo directamente "Quiero que vayas alli" Which, word for word, would be 'I want that you go there'. However, we drop the that in English and add to. So it comes out "I want you to go there"

    By the way, where are you telling them to go? :D
     

    cristóbal

    Senior Member
    EEUU/Inglés
    rogelio said:
    Henrik,
    Quchu is right- only the first one is correct. La segunda frase no esta bien. A lo mejor el profesor estaba traduciendo directamente "Quiero que vayas alli" Which, word for word, would be 'I want that you go there'. However, we drop the that in English and add to. So it comes out "I want you to go there"

    By the way, where are you telling them to go? :D


    Henrik, normalmente, en estos casos la diferencia entre inglés y español es el uso del verbo conjugado (en español) contra el uso del infinitivo:
    I want you to go = Quiero que te vayas

    así que suena tan mal decir "I want that you go" en inglés que suena mal en español decir "Quiero tú irte."
     

    rogelio

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    cristóbal said:
    Henrik, normalmente, en estos casos la diferencia entre inglés y español es el uso del verbo conjugado (en español) contra el uso del infinitivo:
    I want you to go = Quiero que te vayas

    así que suena tan mal decir "I want that you go" en inglés que suena mal en español decir "Quiero tú irte."

    Gracias, Cristobal.
    Lo que dijiste es lo que quise decir, pero no sabia como explicarlo correctamente. Tienes todo el razon.
    Gracias por sus consejos.

    Rogelio
    :cool:
     

    Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    Henrik Larsson said:
    Y la segunda frase no está bien?
    "I want that you go there"
    Lo digo porque un profesor mio, me dijo que sí estaba bien. Y tambien me gustaria saber porque esta mal.
    Saludos

    Ellos tienen razón. No decimos "I want that you do something.'' No sé porque. Quizá alguién sepa le regla.

    I want that you go there. <<---incorrecta!!!

    Sin embargo las siguientes son correctas!

    I see that you go there.
    I forgot that you go there .
    I know that you go there.
    I love it that you go there.
     

    Cian

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Edwin said:
    Ellos tienen razón. No decimos "I want that you do something.'' No sé porque. Quizá alguién sepa le regla.

    I want that you go there. <<---incorrecta!!!

    Sin embargo las siguientes son correctas!

    I see that you go there.
    I forgot that you go there .
    I know that you go there.
    I love it that you go there.

    It doesn't make sense, but what Edwin says it true. Y hay mas!

    I believe that you go there.
    I hope that you go there.
    I hear that you go there.
     

    cristóbal

    Senior Member
    EEUU/Inglés
    Henrik Larsson said:
    Entonces como sería en Inglés: "Quiero que vayas" ?, si según vosotros "I want you to go" es como una orden que indica que te vayas.

    Si te entiendo bien, sería lo mismo... no es siempre una orden, también puede ser un deseo:

    Quiero que vayas al cine sin mí. I want you to go to the theatre without me.
    Quiero que vayas (fuera de mi vista). I want you to go.

    Pues, para distinguir puedes añadir "away" como "I wan you to go away" pero no hace falta para entender. Es como "quiero que te vayas" y "quiero que vayas" son más o menos iguales, no?
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Y también, el único mandato verdadero en inglés es: Go there. Go over there suena mejor. Go away!

    I want you to go no es el imperativo en inglés.
     

    Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    jacinta said:
    Y también, el único mandato verdadero en inglés es: Go there. Go over there suena mejor. Go away!

    I want you to go no es el imperativo en inglés.

    It is grammatically not the imperative mood, but if the general says to the captain (with a strong edge to his voice)

    "I want you to go there right now!"

    the captain will take it to be imperative. :)

    Of course, he is more likely to say,

    "I want you to get your butt over there right this minute.''
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    cristóbal said:
    Pues, para distinguir puedes añadir "away" como "I wan you to go away" pero no hace falta para entender. Es como "quiero que te vayas" y "quiero que vayas" son más o menos iguales, no?


    No Cristóbal, no es lo mismo "QUIERO QUE VAYAS" y "quiero que TE VAYAS"
    En el primer caso vos le decís a alguien que querés que vaya por ejemplo a la tienda a comprarte algo.
    Ej: Quiero que vayas al dormitorio y me traigas las pantuflas.

    Quiero que TE vayas, implica que la persona que está con vos te molesta de alguna manera. Entonces le decís ¡ No quiero verte más, quiero que te vayas inmediantamente!"

    En el primer caso sería "I want you to go to the bedroom and bring my slippers"
    En el segundo caso sería "I don't want to see you any longer, I want YOU TO GO AWAY!"

    Entendés?
    :)
     

    belén

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain, Catalan, Mallorca
    Artrella said:
    Ej: Quiero que vayas al dormitorio y me traigas las pantuflas.
    Hola Art, sólo quería decirte que me encantó este ejemplo y que voy a intentar enseñárselo a mi perra (tanto la forma verbal como el hecho en sí) ;)
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Sorry, everyone, but I disagree: "I want that you go there" is perfectly grammatically correct, it's simply very rarely said. Consider:
    A: I want you to go there.
    B: What is it you want?
    A: That you go there.
    It's one of those rare uses of the English subjunctive. We studied examples like this in my English grammar classes at school hundreds of years (!) ago. Also, on his Advanced Spanish Course, Michel Thomas uses this phrase while explaining the use of the Spanish subjunctive to two educated people, one American the other English. Both of them understand and accept this construct without batting an eyelid.

    So, in my humble opinion, Henrik's profe is right, although it is something of an anachronism.
     

    Durwen

    Senior Member
    Spain. Spanish and Catalan
    Quizá para no dar esa sensación de estar ordenando algo podría decirse "I'd like you to go there" (me gustaría que fueras).
    Por lo que tengo entendido en inglés se usa muchísimo el condicional para pedir las cosas con educancia.

    PD: To all English speakers:"educancia" is a highly incorrect word that I wrote wrong on purpose just for fun. Don't go saying or writing it.
     

    Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    garryknight said:
    Sorry, everyone, but I disagree: "I want that you go there" is perfectly grammatically correct, it's simply very rarely said. Consider:
    A: I want you to go there.
    B: What is it you want?
    A: That you go there.
    It's one of those rare uses of the English subjunctive. We studied examples like this in my English grammar classes at school hundreds of years (!) ago. Also, on his Advanced Spanish Course, Michel Thomas uses this phrase while explaining the use of the Spanish subjunctive to two educated people, one American the other English. Both of them understand and accept this construct without batting an eyelid.

    So, in my humble opinion, Henrik's profe is right, although it is something of an anachronism.


    Garry, you may be right. At least, maybe it was okay 100 years ago :)

    I Googled "I want that you" and found lots of instances on the web. One said it is incorrect. The others seemed to be discussing Spanish grammar, or to be statements by non-native speakers of English. Here's a quote from Paul Shoebottom at Frankfurt International School at:

    http://esl.fis.edu/parents/easy/usage.htm

    Now let's look at one or two verb constructions. The words suggest and advise have very similar meanings but their usage is different. We can say both I advise you to go and I advise that you go, but only I suggest that you go is correct; I suggest you to go is not possible. Conversely, I want you to go is right but I want that you go is not.

    The above is from a website that seems to be devoted to proving that "English is not an easy language" :(

    http://esl.fis.edu/parents/easy/
     

    Cian

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    garryknight said:
    Sorry, everyone, but I disagree: "I want that you go there" is perfectly grammatically correct, it's simply very rarely said. Consider:
    A: I want you to go there.
    B: What is it you want?
    A: That you go there.
    It's one of those rare uses of the English subjunctive. We studied examples like this in my English grammar classes at school hundreds of years (!) ago. Also, on his Advanced Spanish Course, Michel Thomas uses this phrase while explaining the use of the Spanish subjunctive to two educated people, one American the other English. Both of them understand and accept this construct without batting an eyelid.

    So, in my humble opinion, Henrik's profe is right, although it is something of an anachronism.

    This made me feel better. I have used "I want that..." but assumed that it was bad English. Of course it is the English subjunctive and when I think of the examples of times when I have used it, it makes sense. But it really isn't common to hear or to use. So, IMHO, it is a strange thing to teach to non-native speakers without explaining that.
     

    paultucker79

    Senior Member
    UK,English
    garryknight said:
    Sorry, everyone, but I disagree: "I want that you go there" is perfectly grammatically correct, it's simply very rarely said. Consider:
    A: I want you to go there.
    B: What is it you want?
    A: That you go there.
    It's one of those rare uses of the English subjunctive. We studied examples like this in my English grammar classes at school hundreds of years (!) ago. Also, on his Advanced Spanish Course, Michel Thomas uses this phrase while explaining the use of the Spanish subjunctive to two educated people, one American the other English. Both of them understand and accept this construct without batting an eyelid.

    So, in my humble opinion, Henrik's profe is right, although it is something of an anachronism.

    Hi Garry from Bromley (I'm only from Erith - very local considering!). This is an interesting take on English grammar (and one that no doubt will confuse those learning English!). I can understand your argument that "I want that you.." is grammaticially correct but I had never even considered it (let alone hear it or see it)> I accept the construction (since it follows that of "I hope that, I see that, I hear that" etc etc but I would never encourage anyone to use it since people would look at them extremely quizzically (spelling) and 99.99% would immediately correct them.
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    paultucker79 said:
    I can understand your argument that "I want that you.." is grammaticially correct but ... I would never encourage anyone to use it since people would look at them extremely quizzically (spelling) and 99.99% would immediately correct them.
    Oh, I agree. I wouldn't encourage them either. I was simply trying to say the Henrik's profesor wasn't lying when he said the phrase was OK, but he (the profe, not Henrik) should have explained a little better. Anyway, since pragmatics always wins out over semantics, it might be right, but using it wouldn't be.
     
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