'War Power' or 'Power of War'

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SirPortuga

Member
Portuguese
Do they have the same meaning in context and isolated? For instance, comparing the military power of two nations: "US and Russia War Power/Power of War." Are they both correct or is there a reason to choose one of them in this case?
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Do they have the same meaning in context and isolated? For instance, comparing the military power of two nations: "US and Russia War Power/Power of War." Are they both correct or is there a reason to choose one of them in this case?
    Neither phrase seems idiomatic; can you give us the complete sentence?
     

    SirPortuga

    Member
    Portuguese
    Yes, I'm writing an article about the Portuguese/Ottoman war and the title "Sea Vs Land - War Power" came to my mind. Since I'm not a native spaspeaof English I don't know if it sounds natural.
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Yes, I'm writing an article about the Portuguese/Ottoman war and the title "Sea Vs Land - War Power" came to my mind. Since I'm not a native spaspeaof English I don't know if it sounds natural.
    I suspect we'd say "military power," but with an isolated title it's hard to say.
     

    SirPortuga

    Member
    Portuguese
    So the term 'war power' is not the same of 'power of war'? Like, 'The western world has a formidable war power', meaning that the western world has a huge capacity or war. Is it making sense?
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    So the term 'war power' is not the same of 'power of war'? Like, 'The western world has a formidable war power', meaning that the western world has a huge capacity or war. Is it making sense?
    No, that's not something we use, and it could easily be confused with the term "war powers," which refers to the legal authority to wage war.
     

    SirPortuga

    Member
    Portuguese
    I see, so I should use Military Power instead. But, could I use just the term 'Warfare' alone instead of 'War Power' in that title? Would it refer to each country's ability to make war?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    So the term 'war power' is not the same of 'power of war'?
    "War power" is not a standard phrase in English, so it has no defined meaning.

    "Power of war" is not a standard phrase in English, so it has no defined meaning.

    You can use these phrases, but it is best to tell the reader what you mean, like you do above:

    meaning that the western world has a huge capacity or war.
     

    SirPortuga

    Member
    Portuguese
    But if you read the title "Sea vs land - Warfare" would you understand that there will be a confrontation of both land and sea in terms of military power or is it too vague?
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    But if you read the title "Sea vs land - Warfare" would you understand that there will be a confrontation of both land and sea in terms of military power or is it too vague?
    I suggest you don't use "vs" (or "versus") in the same sentence as "warfare". People will immediately think that it refers to the two combatants, rather than a comparison between different spheres of warfare, and if you were using it for the combatants it carries the wrong tone, being associated with sporting events.

    Warfare is not the same as military power, as dojibear said in post #9.
     

    SirPortuga

    Member
    Portuguese
    Yes, I wanna say thank you for the help till now. I'm comparing the ottoman/Portuguese warfare: the Portuguese naval power Vs the Ottomans land power and the outcome of war.
     

    SirPortuga

    Member
    Portuguese
    But could you tell me what do you understand of the title "Sea Vs land - War Rages" alone? Or is it impossible to conceive a meaning from the title alone?
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "War rages" is a state of affairs ("rages" is a verb and "war" is its subject). It would not be understood any other way.

    Are you describing the war itself or each country's preparedness for war? If you are writing about the war then something like "At war by land and sea" might work. I cannot think of a suitable English word that could be used to contrast naval warfare with land warfare, if this is what you are trying to do.
     

    SirPortuga

    Member
    Portuguese
    I think I didn't explain correctly: The title of the article will be: "The Ottoman-Portuguese Battles." But I need a subtitle. I have lot's of ideas. Maybe "Sea Vs Land - Power Comparison." My audience knows Portigal was a Seapower and the Ottomans a Land Power. That's why I think to use just the term sea Vs land. Do you understand my point now?
     
    Last edited:

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think I didn't explained correctly: The title of the article will be: "The Ottoman-Portuguese Battles." But I need a subtitle. I have lot's of ideas. Maybe "Sea Vs Land - Power Comparison." My audience knows Portigal was a Seapower and the Ottomans a Land Power. That's why I think to use just the term sea Vs land. Do you understand my point now?
    That would work better. I know why you want to use "versus" but I still don't think it quite fits. Since you now have "comparison", you could replace "versus" with "and"; alternatively, if your audience already know Portugal was a strong sea power and the Ottoman Empire a strong land power, then you could use the simpler "Sea Power and Land Power", and your readers would realise it was a comparison between the two nations as well as the two areas of warfare.
     
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