Warehouse full of madcap

< Previous | Next >

presl

Senior Member
Hi! I usually hear "madcap" used as adjective to describe plans or people, "1. wildly or heedlessly impulsive; reckless; rash: a madcap scheme." http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/madcap but I have never seen it used in this way - "Warehouse full of madcap" ? Does it sound okay to you? How do you interpret “madcap” in the following context?


[Warehouse 13]

Claudia: ... ... Yeah, it's funny. Years ago, I swear you said you were just a simple professor. I guess you left out the, uh, off-the-grid, top-secret Warehouse full of madcap.

Artie: Claudia, Claudia Donovan.
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It apparently means that something crazy was going on in the warehouse.

    No, it's not a standard expression and apparently is something created by the writer in the hope of being original.
     

    Wayland

    Banned
    English.
    Hi Presl.
    I don't think that there is an actual warehouse being referred to here. This is exaggeration for comic effect.
    My interpretation is that that the girl is saying "everyone thought you were a quiet serious person but you really have a hidden side to your personality; a secret store of craziness; a warehouse full of madcap".
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Madcap is not usually a quality that something can be said to be full of, but as sdgraham points out, it is used here in a novel way for comic effect. There are similar popular usages such as "full of win", which means something like "spot on", exactly right or successful in its aims.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Hi Presl.
    I don't think that there is an actual warehouse being referred to here. This is exaggeration for comic effect.
    My interpretation is that that the girl is saying "everyone thought you were a quiet serious person but you really have a hidden side to your personality; a secret store of craziness; a warehouse full of madcap".
    Actually, there is a warehouse. This comes from the television show "Warehouse 13". :)

    I remember catching the line when I watched the episode. It was the first time I had heard "madcap" as a noun.
     

    Franzi

    Senior Member
    (San Francisco) English
    Claudia uses a lot of strange constructions in her speech. The writers seem to be trying to make her sound like a hip teenager who uses crazy slang. (Instead, she usually sounds like middle-aged tv writers trying way too hard to be cool.)

    Most of what Claudia says is understandable but not very standard. I've never seen 'madcap' used like this before either.
     

    presl

    Senior Member
    Claudia uses a lot of strange constructions in her speech. The writers seem to be trying to make her sound like a hip teenager who uses crazy slang. (Instead, she usually sounds like middle-aged tv writers trying way too hard to be cool.)

    Most of what Claudia says is understandable but not very standard. I've never seen 'madcap' used like this before either.
    :D Franzi, thanks for your comment.

    And JamesM, Matching Mole, Wayland, sdgraham. Thanks, I get it. :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top