Warfare

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jennyunica

Senior Member
italy italian
The context is: a boy just arrived in England and is attending school. There's a group of boys who are friends and play skirmishly with each other. He describes his feeling:

It was my first week at an England school and feeling isolated from the gang warfare I gladly sought out their company.

What do you mean with gang warfare? Is it a synonim of skirmish?

Thanks
Jenny
 
  • AlabamaBoy

    Senior Member
    American English
    Is it a synonim synonym of skirmish?
    To me, gang warfare is much more violent and dangerous than a skirmish. It usually implies a continuing feud and that when the battle is over, the warfare comes back on another day. Unfortunately, in many cases, the fighting continues week after week until the participants are injured beyond the ability to recover, or until they are killed.

    At least that is my take on it, and I lived in Los Angeles for ten years. <Non-English text removed by moderator.>
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The context is: a boy just arrived in England and is attending school. There's a group of boys who are friends and play skirmishly with each other. He describes his feeling:

    It was my first week at an England school and feeling isolated from the gang warfare I gladly sought out their company.

    What do you mean with gang warfare? Is it a synonim of skirmish?

    Thanks
    Jenny
    First of all, you need to understand the concept of "gangs" whether they be street gangs or organized crime. Wikipedia has a good entry for gang.

    These are generally groups of people inclined towards violence against other such groups, hence the term "gang warfare."

    I cannot tell from the contect provided whether the use here is literal or metaphorical.
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    The UK use of gang amongst youngsters used to mean a collection of youngster who played to-gether. The nasty connotations of gangs being bad things was not there some years ago.

    Whether gang warfare is to be taken as real problem is defintively only determinable in each case. "There's a group of boys who are friends and play skirmishly with each other". This sounds completely harmless....

    It could be bad or not. Incorrect interpretation of words can destroy many a good thing.

    GF..
     

    jennyunica

    Senior Member
    italy italian
    As I said in the context's description we are in a schoolground, so I guess GF is right, the author is talking about skirmish, also if in a stronger way-
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Skirmish is a noun, not an adjective!
    Thank you for your note. Of course skirmish is a noun. Skirmishly was used in the original post & I have not found it in any dictionary I have looked at. The word is out there on the internet (just a few search engine hits) and in the references I followed up it is used in the same way as in the originating post of this thread. In the context of the thread it is used well in my opinion. Appending an ly onto the end of a noun is quite common. It may not be in the dictionaries but it is quite clear what the writer meant.

    GF..

    Language communicates ideas. Who defines language? The user, of course. Discuss.
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Just one other thing about gangs. I come from the time of Edith Blyton when gang had a much milder context. Remember the Famous Five.

    GF..

    Gone are those days of youth.
     
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