"Warm welcome" or "a warm welcome"

rickless

Member
Arabic
Dear all,

Could you please correct me the following sentences:

1. Warm welcome (to/for) the new joiners.

2. A warm welcome (to/for) the new joiners.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Please give us the context. Are you saying this, putting it in an email, writing it on a notice board, or using it some other way? Thank you.
    Copyright, moderator.
     

    rickless

    Member
    Arabic
    lets say if I want to use this phrase:


    During meetings and presentations.

    Welcoming new students or employees.

    Welcoming new groups to others.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    This sounds odd to us all by itself, rickless. That is why we want to know how you are using it.

    Are you going to say it at the beginning of a meeting? Or make a sign? If you tell us more about it, we can try to help you. Otherwise, we worry that we might give you bad advice, if we are thinking of one use and you are thinking of something different. :)
     

    rickless

    Member
    Arabic
    Yes, if I have a special guest in a meeting and I would like to welcome him in front of everybody before we start, thus, which one from the below sentences suits the situation:

    1. Warm welcome (to/for) the new joiners.

    2. A warm welcome (to/for) the new joiners.


    What confuses me that "welcome" is not a countable, and I haven't found any explanation why " A warm welcome" have been used in many places.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thank you for identifying it as speech -- that makes all the difference. Since it is speech, you'll want a sentence:

    I would like to offer a warm welcome to all our new joiners.

    I can't shed much light on the article ("a") except to say that we use it. I'm sure someone else can advise us:

    A warm welcome.
    A hearty greeting.
    A long good-bye.
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    What confuses me that "welcome" is not a countable, and I haven't found any explanation why " A warm welcome" have been used in many places.
    Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English classifies the noun 'welcome' as 'singular', which is not the same as 'uncountable'. A singular noun needs a determiner (such as an indefinite article), an uncountable noun does not.

    I would say that in the case where no determiner is used, it's comparable to how headlines often are written, i.e. articles are dropped. So 'warm welcome to our new members' is actually short for 'a warm welcome to our new members', which in turn is short for something along the lines of Copyright's suggestion: 'I/we/the club would like to offer/give a warm welcome to our new members.'
     

    shaoyi311

    New Member
    Mandarin Chinese
    What is the appropriate phrase if I want to make a sign to welcome someone, for example, a professor who is going to visit our company?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    On a sign we will hold or to put up in a room, we would usually write "Welcome, Professor [Name]."

    This is different from what we would say in a speech. In a speech, we use phrases like those Copyright suggested in post #9.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    You could say, "A warm welcome to Professor [name]."
    I don't think there is anything wrong with it, but it's not what I would say.

    To me, this version is more like an announcement -- we giving Professor [name] a warm welcome. However, the professor will understand that you are addressing the welcome to <him> or her.
    The version, "Welcome, Professor [name]." addresses the professor directly, and sounds warmer. You could say <it> when someone comes to your house as well as in formal occasions.

    Nonetheless, you could use either one, according to your preference.

    < Corrections.>
     
    Last edited:

    shaoyi311

    New Member
    Mandarin Chinese
    You could say, "A warm welcome to Professor [name]."
    I don't think there is anything wrong with it, but it's not what I would say.

    To me, this version is more like an announcement -- we giving Professor [name] a warm welcome. However, the professor will understand that you are addressing the welcome to hi or her.
    The version, "Welcome, Professor [name]." addresses the professor directly, and sounds warmer. You could say when someone comes to your house as well as in formal occasions.

    Nonetheless, you could use either one, according to your preference.
    Thank you for your kind explanation~
     
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