Was würden Sie machen, wenn das Licht ausgehen würde, wenn Sie gerade mit einer heissen Suppenschüssel auf der Treppe sind?

Canis Snupus Snupus

Senior Member
English - Australian
Hi everyone

Could someone please explain why sind is used here instead of wären? The context is that this is a question from a pop psychology test.

Was würden Sie machen, wenn das Licht ausgehen würde, wenn Sie gerade mit einer heissen Suppenschüssel auf der Treppe sind?

I would have said "auf der Treppe wären" since it's a hypothetical situation.


Thanks
 
  • Frieder

    Senior Member
    The hypothetical incident is: the lights go out. You being on the staircase with a bowl of hot soup is a given (hypothetical, of course, but not subject to change). So it's K2 for the act and present tense for the given circumstances.
     

    Frieder

    Senior Member
    The meaning wouldn't change at all. I even think that it would be grammatically correct. It just doesn't "feel right" (for lack of a more precise definition).
     

    1Nosferatu2

    Senior Member
    German - standard German/Hochdeutsch
    This is a very interesting one but unfortunately, I can't come up with a precise explanation off the cuff.
    My 2 cents.
    I would most likely use this one.
    Was würden Sie machen, wenn das Licht ausgehen würde, wenn Sie gerade mit einer heissen Suppenschüssel auf der Treppe sind?

    However, the alternative with conjunctive II would be ok as well, it doesn't sound incorrect to me, probably a little less natural.
    Was würden Sie machen, wenn das Licht ausgehen würde, wenn Sie gerade mit einer heissen Suppenschüssel auf der Treppe wären?

    I have to check if there are grammatical rules for this construction.
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Was würden Sie machen, wenn das Licht ausgehen würde, wenn Sie gerade mit einer heissen Suppenschüssel auf der Treppe sind?

    Perhaps one could formulate the second sub-clause in an another way, so as not to confuse its meaning with the hypothetical meaning of the first sub-clause.
    What about ... in dem Moment, wo/in dem Sie gerade mit einer heissen Suppenschüssel auf der Treppe sind?
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    So ↓ formuliert wäre das Ganze einfacher (gewesen):

    Sie sind gerade mit einer heißen Suppenschüssel auf der Treppe. Was würden Sie machen, wenn plötzlich das Licht ausgehen würde?
    ;)
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    So ↓ formuliert wäre das Ganze einfacher (gewesen):

    Sie sind gerade mit einer heißen Suppenschüssel auf der Treppe. Was würden Sie machen, wenn plötzlich das Licht ausgehen würde?
    ;)
    :thumbsup: I think, from a language logic point of view it is natural to set the premise in present tense even if it is hypothetical. English tends to do the same:
    Imagine you're climbing the stairs with a steaming hot pot of soup. What would you do if the lights went out just then? ('Imagine you were climbing' sounds ok but not necessary.)

    Additionally there's the if/when (de: wenn/wenn) issue. In a subclause started with 'when', you're less likely to use subjunctive just for tense congruence reasons:
    What would you do if your TV died when you are in the middle of watching your favorite movie? ('When you were' would sound decidedly wrong to my non-native ears)

    In German we don't have that tense congruence predicament; each sub-clause can use its own tense/mood as long as it makes sense within the sentence and within the idea that is being expressed.
     

    Frieder

    Senior Member
    Was würden Sie machen, wenn das Licht ausgehen würde, wenn Sie gerade mit einer heissen Suppenschüssel auf der Treppe sind?
    I would prefer: "Was würden Sie machen, wenn das Licht ausginge, während Sie gerade mit einer heißen Suppenschüssel auf der Treppe sind?"

    But I like JClaudeK's approach much better:
    Sie sind gerade mit einer heißen Suppenschüssel auf der Treppe. Was würden Sie machen, wenn plötzlich das Licht ausgehen würde?
    :thumbsup:.

    BTW: In order to avoid würde twice you could also say:
    "Sie sind gerade mit einer heißen Suppenschüssel auf der Treppe. Was würden Sie machen, wenn plötzlich das Licht ausginge?"
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi, this is because "wenn" has two meanings: 1. if, 2. when = wenn/während.

    "Während" clarifies that it is a time condition.

    In the original sentence, both are conditions.
    1. wenn das Licht ausgehen würde, 2. wenn Sie gerade mit einer heissen Suppenschüssel auf der Treppe sind?

    But 1. is the change of status, while 2. is the condition defining the place in time. 1. is mainly "if", 2. is "when".
     

    anahiseri

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) and German (Germany)
    I think the German rules for conditional sentences are not as strict and logical as they are in English, (in part?) due to the fact that the Konjunktiv 1 can hardly be distinguished from the Indikativ, and that the Konjunktiv 2 is often replaced by the "würden", an equivalent of "would", because the irregular forma sounds strange.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top