watashi no koto daisuki

  • Noamoxkaltontli

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    Hello Q-cumber,

    That must be "watashi no koto daisuki." 私のこと大好き。
    If it was a stand-alone utterance, it was probably a casual question, namely:
    Do you like me?

    If it is not a stand alone utterance and there was something before, it would be better to provide that context. To translate the sentence accurately.
     

    Aoyama

    Senior Member
    français Clodoaldien
    That must be "watashi no koto daisuki." 私のこと大好き。
    Right, but even then it would not make much sense.
    The sentence, as it is, does/can not mean
    Do you like me?
    that would be "watashi no koto sukidesuka ?" (私のこと好きですか)
    Here "watashi no koto daisuki" literally means "I like myself very much" (unless there is a special context expressed before or after).
    "Anata no koto daisuki" (I like YOU very much) might be another option.
     

    lammn

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Cantonese

    Aoyama

    Senior Member
    français Clodoaldien
    I think it depends on the tone of the speaker.
    If it is said with a raising tone, then it should be a question, and the meaning would become "do you like me?"
    Right, but then it should be with a question mark :
    -"watashi no koto daisuki ?" or "watashi no koto daisuki desuka."
    But STILL, the problem (to me) lies in dai suki. "Watashi no koto [ga] suki ?" would sound more natural, with "dai" it would mean "like very much" (or "love", but for "real love" I think "watashi no koto aishiteru [no]" would be better).
     

    masatom

    Banned
    Japanese
    Right, but then it should be with a question mark :
    But STILL, the problem (to me) lies in dai suki. "Watashi no koto [ga] suki ?" would sound more natural, with "dai" it would mean "like very much" (or "love", but for "real love" I think "watashi no koto aishiteru [no]" would be better).
    Hello, Aoyama.
    I can well understand what you said. But I don't agree with that.
    "Watashi no koto daisuki?" is more natural than "Watashi no koto aishiteru?" in real young women's usage.
    The expression is never spoken by men. Apparently it is for women's, especially young women's.

    "daisuki" is more childish expression than "aishiteru". Young women prefers to use childish expression intentionally. It might be called burikko or kawaiko-burikko (sweet and innocent act). Men in Japan usually prefer childish, pretty women or prefer pretending to be childish women. You know?

    "aishiteru" is used by men more often than young women. And youn women prefer "daisuki".

    So I think "Watashino koto daisuki?" is more natural and real expression by young women.

    Of course there are many women who prefer "aishiteru" rather than "daisuki", I might add.

    Thank you.
     
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    Noamoxkaltontli

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    Aoyama,
    I agree with you on "dai" being too much, but I guess young couples being lovey-dovey do tend to go to (ungrammatical) extremes when they address their better halves.
     

    Aoyama

    Senior Member
    français Clodoaldien
    I guess young couples being lovey-dovey do tend to go to (ungrammatical) extremes when they address their better halves.
    ...could be.
    One other thing also, speaking about young people etc, is that the structure of the sentence is passably unnatural.
    "Watashi no koto" is unusual in a context like this (watashi no koto daisuki), why use "watashi" ?
    "Daisuki [nano] ?", "Hontoni daisuki ?" That's for the lovey-dovey part ...
     

    Noamoxkaltontli

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    It could be, perhaps:
    A) Be a construction that derivated or it is meant to be the opposite the 告白 formula 「あなたのこと大好きです」
    or
    B) The influence of the indoeuropean languages, where "do you love me?" does include the "me" aspect.
    or
    C) The whole "Japanese implicit subject" is only used as an element that shows a degree of formality that is not needed with one's lover.

    To be honest, I don't know for sure...
     

    masatom

    Banned
    Japanese
    Hello.
    I think watashinokotodaisuki? is quite natural Jananese and used in set terms.
    Usually Japanese omits subject and we don't say"Anatawa watasinokotodaisuki?"
    But we don't omit object. It is quite natural to say "watashinokoto" to my ear.
    And "daisuki" is one confirmed Japanese word.
    "suki"=like and "daisuki"=love.
    We often say "dai-dai-dai-dai-dai-daisuki" to express daisuki a lot. And according to my feeling it is strange to feel "dai" is too much. Maybe it is because of the difference of circumstances of Japanese.
    So, to my ear
    "suki?" OK but too short.
    "daisuki?" Much better but still too short.
    "watashiwo suki?" Strange as natural natvie Japanese conversation.
    "Watashinokoto suki?" Perfectly fit as natural native young girl's Japanese.
    "Anatawa watasiwo sukidesuka?" Strange. Definitely it is said by non-native.

    I think "Watashinokotosuki?" is easier to pronounce and easier to hear phonetically
    than " watasiwo suki?"
    And if it is asking about "love" not "like" , it should be "Watashinokotodaisuki?"

    This is just my thinking. And I don't deny your way of thinking also.
    Thank you.
     
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