Watch the bread mold

Ken P.

Member
Russian
Hi there.

I’ve heard something on the radio and I’m not sure I heard it correctly.
But here is the sentence:

You’d think that in a town as small as ... there’d be nothing to do but ... and watch the bread mold.

Is that common to say so: “and watch the bread mold”, when you mean there’s nothing to do?

Thanks
 
  • CaptainZero

    Senior Member
    English
    I just did an internet search, and found that "mold" can be used as a verb, so your sentence is correct, it seems, though I've never heard "mold" used that way before. I've always heard the adjectival form - bread goes moldy.

    I don't know if it's a common way of saying there's nothing to do. I haven't heard it before, but I've heard similar constructions. "It's like watching paint dry", or "It's like watching grass grow" are two common ways of saying that something is taking a long time to happen, and it would be very boring to sit and watch it.
     

    Ken P.

    Member
    Russian
    T
    I just did an internet search, and found that "mold" can be used as a verb, so your sentence is correct, it seems, though I've never heard "mold" used that way before. I've always heard the adjectival form - bread goes moldy.

    I don't know if it's a common way of saying there's nothing to do. I haven't heard it before, but I've heard similar constructions. "It's like watching paint dry", or "It's like watching grass grow" are two common ways of saying that something is taking a long time to happen, and it would be very boring to sit and watch it.
    Thank you so much
     
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