watery, it was.

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carolmoraiss

Banned
Portuguese
Hi, I'm reading Kevin Barry's short story "Fjord of Killary". In the story, it had been raining for a very long time.

Here's the sentence that called my attention: "I quietly leaned on the bar by the till. I looked out the small window. Watery, it was."

Does the structure "it was" after the comma imply any other different kind of message?

When he says "watery" do you guys think he could have not only meant the obvious, but he might also have meant "something too diluted" or "lacking force"?

Thank you!


Here's the link to the full story: Fjord of Killary (By Kevin Barry - The New Yorker)

Thanks!
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Since he has mentioned the rain and the sea several times before that point, and goes on immediately to discuss the high sea lapping at the top of the sea wall, I think we can safely assume he means water in the literal sense. The structure "watery, it was" is intended to reflect an Irish way of speaking. I'm not sure it really does - perhaps one of our Irish members can comment on that - but it fits the stereotype.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    When he says "watery" do you guys think he could have not only meant the obvious, but he might also have meant "something too diluted" or "lacking force"?
    No, it just means that it was coming down in buckets, or, in sheets.

    You can use the inversion for dramatic effect.

    It was watery.
    Watery, it was.

    I personally wouldn't use the word "watery" for rain, and it does sound like it's diluted, but that's not the meaning. And, I hate drinks that are "watery", by the way. :D
     
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