waved goodbye

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taraa

Senior Member
Persian
Can you please explain 'waved' and 'goodbye' grammatically?

Frosty the snowman had to hurry on his way, but he waved goodbye saying don't cry. I'll be back again some day.
Frosty the snowman cartoon
 
  • MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    He just waved to say goodbye. It’s a really common English expression anywhere you go.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    He just waved to say goodbye. It’s a really common English expression anywhere you go.
    "Wave" don't get an object (I saw this in the dictionary) but here 'goodbye' is its object. Why? Since you drop 'to say'?
     

    MrMuselk

    Senior Member
    English - South East England
    I can’t really explain it, but it feels like one of the English language’s many exceptions.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You could, I think, think of it as speaking with your hands. To 'wave goodbye' is to 'say goodbye' but with a gesture of the hands rather than using words.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    You could, I think, think of it as speaking with your hands. To 'wave goodbye' is to 'say goodbye' but with a gesture of the hands rather than using words.
    I understand what it means. But can you explain its grammar, please?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It's an idiom. I'm not sure that there is any grammatical explanation. We can also smile hello - and smile a welcome, which is grammatically transparent. She said "Hello", then waved "goodbye", except that we don't need to use quotation marks.

    wave Grandad goodbye
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    It's an idiom. I'm not sure that there is any grammatical explanation. We can also smile hello - and smile a welcome, which is grammatically transparent. She said "Hello", then waved "goodbye", except that we don't need to use quotation marks.

    wave Grandad goodbye
    Many thanks Velisarius.
    You said the grammar of "smile hello - and smile a welcome" is transparent, these are similar with "waved goodbye", why isn't the grammar of this transparent, please?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I smiled a welcome - the grammar seems obvious:
    I (subject) smiled (verb) a welcome (object). In that sentence the verb is transitive, whereas "smile" is normally intransitive.

    The snowman waved goodbye - I'd just call it an idiomatic phrase, but I'm not a grammarian.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I smiled a welcome - the grammar seems obvious:
    I (subject) smiled (verb) a welcome (object). In that sentence the verb is transitive, whereas "smile" is normally intransitive.

    The snowman waved goodbye - I'd just call it an idiomatic phrase, but I'm not a grammarian.
    I understand. Many thanks.
    If your dictionary tells you that the verb "to wave" is only ever intransitive, then it's not a very good dictionary.
    Have a look here: wave - WordReference.com Dictionary of English
    I looked at the WRF dictionary. It can be transitive too but they are another meanings not the meaning intended here?
     
    Last edited:

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    At the end of the WRF dictionary entry for 'wave' is this:
    to signify or express by a waving movement. to wave a last good-bye.
     

    Broccolier

    Member
    Mandarin - Taiwan
    No, I'm afraid not. You might say 'Call me Broccolier' when first meeting somebody, but it's nothing like 'wave me goodby?'
    Wave to me and say goodbye
    Thats wave me goodbye.
    You can also kiss me goodnight 😘
    Or cook me a meal or make me a pie

    Sounds pretty straight forward to me
     
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