wax job

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Maisha82

New Member
Italian
Hi!
I'm going to show to my students an episode of 'Desperate housewives' where the words 'wax job' are used to refer to a person.
Mr. Solis refers to a guy - with whom Gabrielle had had an affair - as a 'wax job', saying

'You faked it with me while that wax job was hiding in the closet'.

All I could find on google was 'Brazilian wax job' and similar, except from the urban dictionary that mentions something related to sex... but nowhere could I find anything like 'a wax job guy' or similar. Any idea?

Thanks!
 
  • DocPenfro

    Senior Member
    English - British
    The clue might be in the word "closet". Was he referring to a physical cupboard, or was he implying that the man was a closet homosexual? If the latter, then wax-jobs similar to the Brazilian type would be a possibility. Alternatively he might have been suggesting that the man had all the personality of a waxworks dummy.
     

    jmichaelm

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Are you sure it was not "a wack job" / "whack job"?
    That would mean "a crazy person".
    Was there a situation where the man was literally hiding in a closet? If so I think it must be "wack job". It's a very common expression in the US.
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    Was there a situation where the man was literally hiding in a closet? If so I think it must be "wack job". It's a very common expression in the US.

    See, I don't remember this episode, even though I did enjoy watching some of them.
    But as I am searching the Google, I keep finding "wax job" quote from the "DH" series, and not "wack job", so I am not so sure.
    Then again, someone might've misquoted, and then it multiplied.

    I never encountered a "wax job" used toward a human, and can hardly imagine using it, unless the literal "wax job" is meant as the main characteristic of a human.
     

    Linguo IS Dead

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I just listened to the clip. << YouTube link deleted. >>

    It definitely does sound like he says "wax job" and not "whack job". I'm not sure what this means. My guess would be that the speaker is saying either:

    1) the guy in question is the type to have his body hair waxed - he's a vain, hairless, boyish "metrosexual", in contrast to the speaker, who is a hairy, burly, "macho" man

    or

    2) the guy is like a wax dummy - a good-looking mannequin with no actual brains or personality.

    Beyond that, I've got nothing. And yes, they are referring to literal closets.
     
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    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Mr. Solis refers to a guy - with whom Gabrielle had had an affair - as a 'wax job', saying

    'You faked it with me while that wax job was hiding in the closet'.
    The most likely explanation is morzh's suggestion that you misheard "whack-job" (an idiot, a useless person).

    "Wax-jobs" are usually associated with women, and, by extension, those women who have them, yet the "wax-job" referred to is clearly a male.

    I, like morzh, would take the phrase you heard to be "whack-job"
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    Well, Linguo is Dead has just listened to it and he says it is "wax job"; him being an AE speaker, I tend to believe him.

    Also, the crowd in the "DH" series is a very specific one, the show revolving around some glamorous and semi-glamorous, or wanna-be glamorous people, so I can see how someone would be called "a wax job". I just wonder whom they were speaking about.
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    I've just listened to it.

    It is "wax job".

    And, I think I might know what it is.

    He refers to his eyebrows, that may be too perfect for a guy. May be a wax job performed on his eyebrows.
     

    Maisha82

    New Member
    Italian
    Thanks for your answers!

    I was watching the DVD and 'wax job' is what is written in the subtitles... The guy in question is actually married and his wife is pregnant, but I guess the reference to a typically female practice may be a way to make him look like a weak or coward person...
     

    modulus

    Senior Member
    ইংরেজি - আমেরিক
    I don't know if someone has proposed this or not, but it is possible that the actor misspoke, but the producer/director of the show decided to let it slide and not reshoot the scene.
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    In the context, given the conversation and the participants, I would actually have more problems with understanding "wack job" than with "wax job".
    I don't think the actor misspoke.
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    A wax job: somebody who has his or her hair removed by waxing (a painful method of hair removal which uses wax and pieces of special paper or foil and when they are almost permanently attached to your body, they are being pulled with an inhuman force by the beautIcian, a kind of 21st century masochistic routine). It used to be something mostly women would to do their legs, and other parts, but recently it has been popular among some men, the kind that goes for manicures, and likes things like that. I think this is what is meant: a man who pays attention to his appearance and has wax done.
     

    morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    New age metrosexual, you mean. "A man in touch with himself"?

    If this is the case, yes, one could probably use "waxjob" as a disparaging term.

    I theorized he was talking about his eyebrows. They indeed looked a bit too perfect.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    In practice, it doesn't matter whether the scriptwriter/actor had the body-waxing or the wax dummy in mind - the result is the same: someone to smooth and perfect to be true.

    As Juliet's nurse said to her of the Count Paris: "Why he's a man of wax!... A flower, in faith a very flower!"
     

    pwmeek

    Senior Member
    English - American
    In spite of several opinions that it sounds like "wax job", whack-job or wack-job is such a common phrase, that I find it difficult to believe that a script writer would use such a similar-sounding phrase, especially if it were a new coinage.

    So far, everything seems like trying to force "wax-job" to have a meaning that refers to a person. No one (so far) has said, "Yes, I heard this just the other day, referring to a person," (as opposed to a beauty treatment). If wax-job really exists as a phrase referring to a person, I would expect at least one person here to have heard of it.

    Just my opinion.

    Have we considered the possibility that the actor misread (or misheard; can actors read? :D ) his dialog and actually did say "wax-job" instead of "wack-job"? This would obviate any need to define it.
     

    jmichaelm

    Senior Member
    English - US
    << YouTube link deleted. >>

    Agreed, he says "wax job." From the context I take it to mean he is calling the other man "unmanly." It's possible this is a common expression in Hollywood which the screenwriter assumed is well known.
     
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