Wax poetic‏

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  • Eigenfunction

    Senior Member
    England - English
    Personally I'm more familiar with the phrase wax lyrical, but it sounds like the meaning is very similar. If one were to wane lyrical/poetic, do you think one would enter into some sort of linguistic retreat while remaining poetic, or would one become less and less poetic?
     

    Schrodinger's_Cat

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hi Eigenfunction,

    Are you a math major student?
    Well, I'm not a language expert. I'm a physics major student ... my speech is influenced by math/physics... In the physical world, objects increase/grow or decrease/vanish or die ... the moon waxes and wanes, etc.

    Since the expression "wax poetic" exists, I wonder whether it makes sense to ask, "could one wane poetic?"
     

    Eigenfunction

    Senior Member
    England - English
    I'm a physics student in fact. Your question seems reasonable to me, I'm just trying to work out exactly how wax is used in the original phrase, so that I can decide what I think the opposite, wane poetic should mean.

    When one waxes poetic, does one wax and wane while remaining poetic, or does one remain constant while the poetry waxes and wanes within us?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I think "he waned poetic/lyrical/eloquent" sounds like a great put-down...

    Now you've invented it, BenVitale, I shall try to use it:D
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    This has been featured recently in the Phrase Finder website: see here, where the author Gary Martin signs off:

    Time for me to wane lyrical and stop.
    A playful use, no?
     

    Schrodinger's_Cat

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yeah, I saw that when I posted the link.

    Since wax and wane are opposites; (+x) and (-x). I was just wondering how I could create such a concept in writing, speech, etc.

    I was surprised to find that this word is an offshoot of the Indo-European Language family's root fragment "aug", from whence we get words like augment, inaugurate, auxilliary, august, and auction.

    http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/15964
     
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