we’ve got a surfing lesson booked

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
Ashlie and Stephen walked into a sports shop:
- We’ve got a surfing lesson booked. We don’t have any equipment so we’ll have to hire everything, if that’s alright.
British Council video

1. It's the present perfect of "get something booked"
2. It's teh simple present: "to have something booked"
Which one is correct?
Thank you.
 
  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    It's the simple present. It's similar to "I've got a bar of chocolate", except the "possession" in question is a booking for a surfing lesson.
     

    lapdwicks

    Senior Member
    Sinhala
    It's the simple present. It's similar to "I've got a bar of chocolate", except the "possession" in question is a booking for a surfing lesson.
    Doesn't it mean that I have made somebody book that lesson for me?

    Is "I have got my hair cut" similar to "I have got my hair" or "I have my hair" (without considering "cut")?
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    Doesn't it mean that I have made somebody book that lesson for me?

    Is "I have got my hair cut" similar to "I have got my hair" or "I have my hair" (without considering "cut")?
    No, it doesn't mean that. if you meant that you would say "I got..."

    I don't think I would say "I have got my hair cut" : again, I think you would say "I got my hair cut".
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Doesn't it mean that I have made somebody book that lesson for me?

    Is "I have got my hair cut" similar to "I have got my hair" or "I have my hair" (without considering "cut")?
    No. "I have had my hair cut." (causative - I have had someone cut my hair.) is not similar to "I have my hair." (possession - I am not bald.)
     

    lapdwicks

    Senior Member
    Sinhala
    No. "I have had my hair cut." (causative - I have had someone cut my hair.) is not similar to "I have my hair." (possession - I am not bald.)
    Yes I mean the same.

    By the way, can't we say I have got something done instead of saying I have had something done?
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Thank you for the answers.

    I.e., do I correctly understand that if I want to use the pattern "to have something done", I can say:
    I have had it done
    I have it done
    I have got it done


    And if I want to use "to get something done", I'd say
    I got something done
    but not
    I've got something done
    :confused:
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    Thank you for the answers.

    I.e., do I correctly understand that if I want to use the pattern "to have something done", I can say:
    I have had it done
    I have it done
    I have got it done


    And if I want to use "to get something done", I'd say
    I got something done
    but not
    I've got something done
    :confused:
    No.

    I have something done : I habitually engage someone to do this for me
    I have had something done : I engaged someone to do this for me

    I got something done : This was achieved due to my initiative, by me or by others
    I have got something done : I can't think of a context where I would use this.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi Vik

    "I've got" is ambiguous in BrE. "I've got a letter from John" can mean "I have a letter written by John" or "I have received a letter sent by John".

    "We've got a surfing lesson booked" probably means "We have a surfing lesson booked". But in some situations it could mean somthing akin to "We've managed to book a surfing lesson".
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Hi Vik

    "I've got" is ambiguous in BrE. "I've got a letter from John" can mean "I have a letter written by John" or "I have received a letter sent by John".

    "We've got a surfing lesson booked" probably means "We have a surfing lesson booked". But in some situations it could mean somthing akin to "We've managed to book a surfing lesson".
    Hi Loob. But can we replace the purple part with "have got"?...
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Purple part, purple part - gosh, my eyesight is going:eek:

    Which bit is the purple part?
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Purple part, purple part - gosh, my eyesight is going:eek:

    Which bit is the purple part?
    You said:
    "We've got a surfing lesson booked" probably means "We have a surfing lesson booked".
    Is it the same as:
    "We have got a surfing lesson booked" probably means "We have a surfing lesson booked" ?
    :)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Yes.

    But in most situations, "We have got" woudld be attenuated, so it would sound exactly like "We've got".

    You would only say "We have got..." with full stress on the "have" if someone had suggested that you hadn't got the lesson booked....
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    Because "done" is a past participle, whereas in the original "booked" is an adjective.

    We we have got something (which is) booked.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Because "done" is a past participle, whereas in the original "booked" is an adjective.

    We we have got something (which is) booked.
    But have got , 've got, have are the same verbs, aren't they? And I can't see much difference between 'booked' and 'done'. The adjective 'booked' refers to the verb 'book': They've booked the lesson and now it's booked. Compare: they've done something and now it's done. Am I wrong?
     
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