we’ve <made a profound hash of the circuses part of the programme>

Discussion in 'English Only' started by longxianchen, May 24, 2016.

  1. longxianchen Senior Member

    chinese
    Hi,
    Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover( page 267, chapter 13) by Lawrence (planetebook,here):

    It is one of the most momentous facts of social science. Panem et circenses! Only today education is one of the bad substitutes for a circus. What is wrong today is that we’ve made a profound hash of the circuses part of the programme, and poisoned our masses with a little education.

    The part in blue is a little confusing for me. I'm not sure whether circuses modifies part(Normally, we use singular noun to modify another one, for example, apple tree) or that the sentence structure is we've made a profound hash of the circuses (become) part of the programme.
    If neither, what's the meaning of it please?
    Thank you in advance
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2016
  2. Franco-filly Senior Member

    Southern England
    English - Southern England
    The part of the programme that relates to / deals with / concerns "circuses"
     
  3. Hermione Golightly

    Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    London
    British English
    'Circuses' functions like an adjective here, and because the original is plural the adjectival use is plural, 'the circuses part' of it. If he'd been talking about bread he would have said 'the bread part' of it.

    It isn't a set phrase or compound noun like 'apple tree'. There's no reason why a plural noun shouldn't be used to qualify a singular noun, as we want and need.

    If I was organising a party I would think about food and games. If I had all the food organised, but not enough games I might say 'The food part (of my party) is fine, but the games part still needs a lot of organising.'
     
  4. johngiovanni

    johngiovanni Senior Member

    Lawrence wrote that universal education was "psychologically barbaric, so uncouth". Children did not have a lot of fun, and they were not stimulated to develop creative and imaginative approaches to the world around them.
    (It is ironic, perhaps, that we can read Lawrence's novels and his other writings thanks in no small part to the universal education we have benefited from).
     
  5. longxianchen Senior Member

    chinese
    Thank you three.
    And Hermione is always giving me surprises
     
  6. Hermione Golightly

    Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    London
    British English
    It's even more ironic considering that without universal education, his mother and he himself would have been illiterate. I seem to recall his miner father was barely literate. You can take the man out of the mine, and take the mine out of the man too, in his case anyway.
     
  7. longxianchen Senior Member

    chinese
    Sorry, there's still a last question left. What does profound hash mean please?
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2016
  8. Hermione Golightly

    Hermione Golightly Senior Member

    London
    British English
    t means a very deep mess of something.
     
  9. longxianchen Senior Member

    chinese
    Serious mess? I thought it to be absolute/complete pile of things
     

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