we continually "turn to" leaders who "appeal to" the worst in us

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Rabau

Member
Cantonese
Hi Everyone,
I was reading a book and there was a sentence “why we continually turn to leaders who appeal to the worst in us? ”

There are 2 doubts for me to understand the correct meaning of the author,

“turn to”
It’s a verb here, would it mean ?
1) gradually transform into
2) listen and believe in

“appeal to”
This is also a verb, I’ve looked it up in the Oxford online,
1) Try to persuade someone to do something by calling on (a particular principle or quality)
2) Be attractive or interesting.


In my personal understanding,
1st guess to “turn to” may prevail and 2nd to “appeal” may be correct, right?
A) But does the sentence make sense?
B) What is the original meaning by the author?


Thank you for help in advance! :)
 
  • Rabau

    Member
    Cantonese
    @bennymix
    thank you very much for help!

    is that to say: "We believe leaders who can make us to show the worst quality(see through us)?"

    is "worst in us" a habitual saying ?
     
    @bennymix
    thank you very much for help!

    is that to say: "We believe leaders who can make us to show the worst quality(see through us)?"

    is "worst in us" a habitual saying ?
    It is not exactly that. The draw out, elicit our worst qualities and try to do so. They say, "immigrant rapists are after your daughter" and that touches on our fears and makes them stronger; makes us hate immigrants as likely rapists.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I think it's 2 and 2.

    why we continually turn to leaders who appeal to the worst in us

    why we continually decide to listen to and believe in leaders who are attractive or interesting to the worst side of us

    As in many definitions, in number 2 they are not two separate things, but two aspects of the same thing.
     

    Rabau

    Member
    Cantonese
    Many thanks for the further explanation @bennymix @kentix

    The confusion now remains to the "appeal to"
    I've also looked up in Merriam-Webster in addition to Oxford online.
    The definition in MW is slight different from what listed in Oxford in first post
    intransitive verb

    1: to arouse a sympathetic response
    2: to make an earnest request
    3 law : to take a lower court's decision to a higher court for review
    4: to call upon another for corroboration, vindication, or decision
    the context of this sentence is describing the natural tendency of human behaviour.
     
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